東洋音楽研究
Online ISSN : 1884-0272
Print ISSN : 0039-3851
ISSN-L : 0039-3851
1981 巻 , 46 号
選択された号の論文の11件中1~11を表示しています
  • 竹内 道敬
    1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 1-95
    発行日: 1981/08/25
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
    The mainstream of Japanese Edo period music is taken to be the shamisen music. However, even within the same Edo period, between Edo and what was known as ‘Kamigata’-the Kinki area centering arotrid Kyoto and Osaka-there was, as far as transportation is concerned, a marked separation. Even within the musical expression of these two regions there is a great difference which has to be taken into consideration.
    In the early Edo period the difference between Edo and Kamiga.ta. labeled Edo as ‘martial’ and Kamigata as ‘literary, ’ or Kamigata as ‘regulated’ and Edo as ‘chaotic.’ Colloquially it was said that “music comes from Kyoto, warfare comes from Edo, ” and the events of that period reflect this well. Regarding the music from the middle Edo period, it is recognized that Gidayubushi developed in the Kamigata region and Bungo style Joruri (Tokiwazu, Tomimoto, Kiyomoto, etc.) in the Edo region, but it is easy to overlook their regionality. Of course, even within the Kamigata region, there was a difference between Kyoto and Osaka.
    The differences described above are well known, but Nagoya, which is positioned between the two aforementioned Kamigata and Edo regions, is again different and has formed its own culture with special characteristics. Even now, when the distances between these areas have shortened and all of Japan has been trifled into one cultural region, the special characteristics of these regions, which up trail a short time ago had a definate originality, are recognized. It's difficult to characterize the special characteristics of the Nagoya culture in a few words. It had its beginnings when Tokugawa Muneharu became the governor of the Owari (Nagoya) region in November of the 15th year of Kyoho 1730). He increased the number of theaters, opened up an entertain m(ent district, splendorized the festivals, and promoted the arts. Going against the will of the Edo government, he created a government policy of freedom and endeavored to make Nagoya into a great city. He believed that such a policy was necessary in order to make Nagoya into an attractive economic center. However, his policy was outlawed by the Edo government and collapsed after only eight years. For the people of Nagoya, his government was like a short “dream.” His policy of freeeom brought prosperity, however, after the “dream” passed, it became a fleeting after-fact. The people of Nagoya, in remembrance of this, left a chronicle, “After the Dream.” Yasuda Bunkichi did an excellent study on this chronicle in 1978.
    This tradition, however, didn't die out with the Edo government's prohibition. It is hinted at even today in the saying, “Nagoya.a place for the arts, ” that this tradition lives on.
    The special characteristics of the arts of Nagoya have hardly been researched up until now. Only very recently, has Mr. Yasuda presented several excellent theses on Tokiwazu, but his work is, presently, limited to Tokiwazu. I have attempted to broaden this research and begin study on the whole of shamisen music as well. As the basic fcxridation for this research, I have made an investigation of all the Nagoya publications of Keico-bon (Lesson Instruction Book), which necessitated collecting, over a long period of time, the Nagoya shamisen music Keilco-bon. However, there is a limit to what an individual can accumulate, and fortunately, Mr. Yasuda has also made a collection, and there is a collection as well in Research Archieves for Japanese Music, Ueno Gakuen College. Therefore, given this chance, I organized all the published Keiko-bon and decided to report on this first step of the basic research. In the report, I have arranged the books according to number by their owner, and provided photographs of all their covers, even in cases where they were duplications.
  • 文亀元年四月四日山科中納言言国宛後 柏原天皇女房奉書
    福島 和夫
    1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 97-121
    発行日: 1981/08/25
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
    There exists a letter written by the EmperorG okashiwabarda, a ted the 4th Day of the 4th Month of the First Year of the Bunki Era (A. D. 1501), addressedt o Yamashinnao ChunagonT okilcunMi, inistero f Music.
    The Emperor admonishes in it that, in place of the recently deceased Toyohara-noS higeakiU, ta no Kami (Director of the Bureauof Music). who was a teacher of Sho both to the Emperora nd to Tokilcuni Muneaksi hould assume the responsibilityo f givings trict training to young musiciansp, articularly to Masuaki and Moroaki.
    This newly found historical material is reproduced here. At the same time, studies are made, o n the basis of diaries of court-noblesi ncluding Tokikunikyo ki and Sanetaka-ko ki, as well as Socho shuki; m emoirso f the poet Socho, of peoplec oncernedth erewith, e speciallyth e men of the ToyoharaF amily, w ho, from the Heian Period on, served the Imperial Court with Sho as their principal instrument.
    It was in the summero f the NinthY ear of the Eisho ra (A. D. 1512) that Toyohara-noM uneakia, representative musiciano f the MuromachiP eriod, completedh is great work, Taigensho in 20 Books.
  • 翻刻と検討
    安田 文吉
    1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 123-149
    発行日: 1981/08/25
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
    宇治加賀操は浄瑠璃史的には古浄瑠璃から新浄瑠璃への過渡期に位置した人で、古浄瑠璃の太夫中最も新しい芸道論を展開している。加賀豫の芸道論については、これまで延宝六年 (一六七八) 刊の「竹子集」や延宝九年 (一六八の一) 刊の「大竹集」、貞享二年 (一六八五) 刊の「小竹集」、同三年刊の「新小竹集」、元禄一〇年 (一六九七) 刊の「門弟教訓」の序文等のほか、門人栄竹の手になる正徳二年 (一七一二) 刊の「九曲巻」の序文が知られているが、此度、これらの資料とは別の全く新しい加賀橡関係の資料を閲覧・調査する機会を得た。この資料は上野学園日本音楽資料室の所蔵になるもので、同室室長福島和夫先生の御厚意により、本資料の全文翻刻の許可をいただいたので、本稿では全文を翻劾し、併せて本資料の検討・考察を行うことにする。
  • 群馬県大間々町祇園祭の調査報告
    長沢 利明
    1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 151-172
    発行日: 1981/08/25
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
  • 群馬県大間々町祇園祭の調査報告
    長沢 利明
    1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 172-151
    発行日: 1981/08/25
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
    This report presents the results of a study conducted in the lJmama town, in the Yamada-gun, in Gunma Prefecture. The study, which centered on the Gion Festival held in )mama, placed particular emphasis on the special characteristics of the folk music found there, as manifested in the percussion ensembles. Omama has long been prosperous as an important trade center, and the Gion Festival held there is in honor of the local market dieties, who are enshrined in the Yasaka Shrine. The festival is held each year during the first three days of August, with manyv isitors from neighboringa reas comingt o watch and enjoy the lively atmosphere. As part of the celebration, six stage wagons ( dashi), one from each district of the town, are wheeled through the s treets, each bearing an ensemble of festival musicians. This report deals with the performance practices of the percussionists in these ensembles. The main points are outlined below.
    1 Concerning music for the taiko drums, several patterned sequences were identifiedi, n cluding Santeko, Kiri, Tama, Hirabayashi, N imba and Amadare.T hese patterns are executed by four children playing small taiko drums and one adult playing a large taiko drum. Each of these patterns may also be played in combination with a flute (fue) and small hand gong (kane).
    2 Variations in performance practice can be seen from district to district for most of the patterns, although the Santeko pattern is an exception, and is performed in exactly the same way in all six districts.
    3 Comparison of these variations reveals that the patterns in the fifth district are relatively complex, and seem to have a closer link to older traditional styles, while patterns in the fourth district are somewhat simplified and abbreviated.
    4 When considering the reasons why such variations evolved, importance must be attributed to the social structure of the Gin Festival itself, with each district virtually autonomous and each performance ensemble carrying on its tradition from generation to generation in an independent manner. The handing down of the performance tradition, and the training and cultivation of new musicians, are the responsibility of each individual district, and it is therefore not surprising that variations in performance practice arise.
  • 1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 175b
    発行日: 1981年
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
  • 1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 175c
    発行日: 1981年
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
  • 1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 175a
    発行日: 1981年
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
  • 1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 175d
    発行日: 1981年
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
  • 1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 202-211
    発行日: 1981/08/25
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
  • 1981 年 1981 巻 46 号 p. 211-202
    発行日: 1981/08/25
    公開日: 2010/11/30
    ジャーナル フリー
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