Transactions of the Virtual Reality Society of Japan
Online ISSN : 2423-9593
Print ISSN : 1344-011X
ISSN-L : 1344-011X
Volume 16 , Issue 1
Showing 1-20 articles out of 20 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages Cover1-
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages Toc1-
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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  • Type: Index
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages Toc2-
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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  • Takeshi Kurata, Hirotake Ishii, Takenori Hara
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 1-
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 2-
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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  • Kazuhiro Matsushita, Daisuke Iwai, Kosuke Sato
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 3-12
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    This paper aims to extend the concept of interactive surface to everyday objects. In particular, we propose an interactive bookshelf surface to support in situ book searching and storing. In the book searching support, when a user touches the edge of the bookshelf, the cover image of a stored book located above the touched position is projected directly onto the book spine. As a result, the user can search for a desired book by sliding his/her finger across the shelf edge. In the book storing support, when a user brings a book close to the bookshelf, the place where the book should be stored is visually highlighted by projection light. We confirmed the feasibility of the system and the effectiveness of the proposed interaction techniques through user studies.
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  • Tetsuya Ueda, Kunihiko Kasahara, Masafumi Oda, Takenori Hara, Goro Mot ...
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 13-22
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    Facilities information for users is usually provided by signboards, posters, bulletin boards and brochures. However, it is difficult to provide enough information to users because of space limitations. Today, interactive information systems using intuitive input interfaces like touch-panels have been proposed. Users can get information by passing through dialogical processes. However, this kind of systems may be inconvenient for some first time users. In this paper, we present an interactive navigation system using brochures to solve the problems. Our system detects the brochure held by a user, tracks the user's finger points and then shows the information dynamically on the floor. We developed a prototype with an intelligible and interactive design for general users. In addition, we also give results of demonstration experiments to prove the efficacy of our system.
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  • Tomoya Ishikawa, Masakatsu Kourogi, Takeshi Kurata
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 23-33
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    We describe evaluations of a service-worker tracking system using measured data from real shop floors and mixed reality (MR)-based applications for supporting behavior analysis of service workers. We installed the tracking system in two labor-intensive service fields and measured the behavioral data of workers for several hours. We also conducted evaluations of the tracking system and surveyed the load on the workers by the measurements using questionnaires. Results confirmed that our system did not give significant loads to workers in spite of the long-term measurements. We also confirmed that the sensor/data fusion using our wearable sensor module, sparsely placed radio frequency identification (RFID) tags, and 3-D indoor models makes not only inexpensive and accurate tracking possible, but also the tracking of position, orientation, and action compared with the localization only by RFID tags and a tag reader. Furthermore, MR-based applications for supporting behavior analysis using virtualized real environments and tracking data have been commented that it is effective for supporting intuitive and cognitive behavior analysis from both managers in service fields and behavior analysis specialists.
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  • Atsushi Hiyama, Tomoaki Imai, Tomohiro Tanikawa, Michitaka Hirose
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 35-44
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    In this paper we propose an augmented reality vehicle systems that provides mobility support and enables a museum curator to present guide tour to museum visitors from outside exhibition hall. In museums, exhibition guide tour is widely conducted as a strong support for exhibition appreciation activity. Effectiveness in exhibition guide tour is based on its interactivity caused by face to face discussion between visitors and a curator. However, it has strong restriction in space and time for a curator, museums are not able to perform exhibition guide tour frequently. Therefore, we propose the systems that experts in exhibition theme can perform such a guide tour through personal mobility and network to provide more opportunities that museum visitors can learn about exhibition theme deeply.
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  • Jungwoo Hyun, Anjin Park, Tomoya Ishikawa, Masakatsu Kourogi, Yoshiko ...
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 45-56
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    In this paper, we introduce a Service-Field Simulator (SFS) to virtually provide service fields in which users are repeatedly able to walk and perform relatively simple tasks that are frequently seen in actual service fields. In addition, the simulator can also be used for realizing the pre-evaluation to design the service fields based on an understanding of the conscious and unconscious behavior of the users. In particular, we realize information sharing through communication between a service provider and a service receiver, or through written materials and handheld devices in virtual/augmented reality environments, which are also important tasks in the service field. We also carried out a feasibility study on the SFS using simple experiments by comparing behaviors in a real environment (RE) and its augmented virtuality (AV) environment. Based on this study, we were able to confirm that our simulator can offer an immersive sense, as well as a sense of presence and involvement, despite a low degree of realism and a high task load in AV environments. Moreover, we observed that subjects maintain their sense of absolute orientation and can share information by written materials and through the use of a photo-realistic avatar. We also determined the capability of the SFS for the pre-evaluation of service fields reproduced in AV environments.
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  • Kan Arai, Katsunori Okajima
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 57-64
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    We formed two hypotheses on the requirements necessary for contrast effect to occur, and conducted two experiments to investigate effects of audio-visual information on acting force perception by using a virtual reality system that we developed. Moving object tasks on paper stimulus with several kinds of visual stimuli were done in experiments according to the hypotheses. The results showed that the magnitude of force perception can be modified by audio-visual information and can be explained as an average of tactile force and audio-visual information, suggesting that the contrast effect with a tactile gain control by audio-visual information may occur only in passive haptic events not in active ones.
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  • Takeyuki Arai, Kinya Fujita, Masaru Takeichi
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 65-72
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    The purpose of this study is to discuss the cause of distance underestimation in distance anticipation task of occluded moving object. We displayed moving stripes at random velocities after the occlusion, and let 10 subjects compare those with the representational velocity of the occluded object. The results supported the accurately preserved representational velocity after the object occlusion. The cause of the distance underestimation appears not the representational velocity slowdown of the occluded moving object. The eye movement during the task was also measured. The answer request substantially slowed the eye moving velocity after the occlusion, compared to the non-answer-request condition. The cause of the distance underestimation is likely the answer request of the anticipated movement distance. The distance anticipation task requires the subjects to answer the anticipated object movement distance using a scale on the stationary board when a visual stimulus is applied. It requires the subjects pay attention to the stationary scale and the virtually moving object simultaneously. This divided attention is the probable cause of the distance underestimation in distance anticipation task of occluded moving object.
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  • Takeharu Seno, Takao Sato
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 73-78
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    The static images of moving objects implied some kind of motion. This type of motion is named the implied motion. We examined whether the implied motion induces the shift of the gravity center of the subjects. The results indicate that the implied motion definitely had some effect to the posture control.
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  • Takeharu Seno, Hiroyuki Ito, Shoji Sunaga
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 79-81
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    We examined whether vection modulates the valence of recollected memories. We set strong and weak vection conditions and forward and backward vection conditions. The results indicate that stronger vection induces more negative memories. Thus we conclude that vection can alter the valence of the recollected memories.
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  • Rahman Md. Mostafizur, Kazutaka Mitobe, Masafumi Suzuki, Noboru Yoshim ...
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 83-92
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    It is important to measure the dexterous finger movements for piano education. But there are some problems to measure accurately of finger movements with angular position due to the complex finger bones construction. In this research, the complex and soft hand movements of a professional pianist were observed using different melodious music as an example, though it can measure any types of finger movements using magnetic motion capture (MoCap) system. The system can measure the complex finger movements with six degrees of freedom (6DOF). From the measured data, we calculated the finger height in space while playing the piano. We have investigated the hand/fingers status during playing the piano. The knowledge of finger movements of an expert pianist is useful for the skill learning. The data and knowledge of finger movements can be applicable in various fields where dexterous movements are essentials such as piano education.
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  • Maori Kobayashi, Shinji Fujii, Yukio Iwaya, Shuichi Sakamoto, Yoiti Su ...
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 93-97
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    The perception of the spatial location of an auditory stimulus can be captured by a spatially disparate visual stimulus, a phenomenon known as the ventriloquism effect. Many studies have shown temporal and spatial dependency of this phenomenon but its temporal dynamics are not fully understood. In this study, we presented participants with a three-minute of audio-visual stimuli, consisting of a pair of light and sound noise with a spatial disparity of either 0, 5 or 10 degrees. Ten participants were instructed to observe the audio-visual stimuli, and to report their position consistency of stimuli by pushing one of two bottoms, which indicated "same" or "different" respectively. The time series reported were analyzed as perceptual transitions. The results showed that (1) the mean total duration of the "same location" response increased as the disparities between noise and light decreased, (2) the percept switched during the stimulus presentation in all disparity condition after initial build-up of perception of "same location", and (3) the mean transition times varied depending on the disparity condition. These results show that the ventriloquism effect varies with observation time, suggesting that audiovisual spatial integration have time-varying nature.
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  • Yutaka Nakajima, Takao Sato
    Type: Article
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 99-102
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    The existence of top-down modulation from global- to local-motion mechanisms is examined by using motion-aftereffect (MAE) with four-patch pseudo-gabor stimuli containing either global (translation and rotation) or local (single patch) motion. MAE durations were measured with a stationary gabor test patch whose position coincided with one of the adaptation patches. The duration was almost equal between the three conditions. These results indicate that there is little top-down interaction from global- to local-motion mechanisms, and suggest that the flow of motion information is mainly bottom-up as long as MAE strength is concerned.
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages 103-105
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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  • Type: Appendix
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages App1-
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (45K)
  • Type: Cover
    2011 Volume 16 Issue 1 Pages Cover2-
    Published: March 31, 2011
    Released: February 01, 2017
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    Download PDF (153K)
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