Transactions of the Virtual Reality Society of Japan
Online ISSN : 2423-9593
Print ISSN : 1344-011X
ISSN-L : 1344-011X
Volume 24 , Issue 2
Showing 1-6 articles out of 6 articles from the selected issue
  • Hirofumi Kaneko, Vibol Yem, Yasushi Ikei
    2019 Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 143-152
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 30, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    We aimed to generate a walking sensation for a person who just sits on a chair. We considered that, such a virtual walking method allows a local person to experience the performances of other person or a robot who being at the remote area. In this study, we proposed a method of using tendon electrical stimulation combined with kinesthetic sensation on the lower limbs for providing high realistic sensation of walking. We developed a system that can present multisensory stimuli of visual image, kinesthetic and electrical pulses. Electrodes were placed on both the Achilles tendons and the tibialis anterior tendons of the lower limbs. We preliminarily investigated the placement of the electrodes at the lower limbs in terms of sensation of tension to select the appropriate location. We also investigated the sensation of translational motion and the sensation of walking when visual stimulation and electrical/kinesthetic stimulation were presented to the lower limbs. The result of the subjective rating indicated that kinesthetic stimulation could generate the sensations of translational motion and walking. Furthermore, tendon electrical stimulation could enhance these sensations to create more realistic experience.

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  • Yasushi Ikei, Koichi Hirota, Koji Abe, Tomohiro Amemiya, Makoto Sato, ...
    2019 Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 153-164
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 30, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In the present paper, we propose a new concept of physical reliving experience and its contents that implemented partial function of the concept. Passive motion stimuli to the body impart more realistic experience than active free body motion in creating the sensation of past experience that involved body motion. We built a first-person reliving system that presented multisensory stimuli including passive motion stimulus. The vestibular, proprioceptive and tactile sensations are the specifically focused presentation used in conjunction with an ordinary visual and auditory replay. Three kinds of virtual travel experiences and a world-record sprint race where demonstrated to the public. The evaluation result showed that the sensations of walking and presence at the remote environment were markedly increased by the bodily stimulus. Airflow and scent presentation in the multisensory system impressed attendees highly in the walking experience of a real scene.

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  • Zhengqing Li, Shio Miyafuji, Toshiki Sato, Hideki Koike, Naomi Yamashi ...
    Type: Paper
    2019 Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 165-176
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 30, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Field-of-view limitation has been a long-standing issue in video communication systems. With the development of omnidirectional panoramic technology, the omnidirectional camera, which can provide a 360° field-of-view, has been getting more and more popular within the last few years. Previous research indicated that one-way video communication systems with a wider field-of-view improve task efficiency with fewer collisions. Therefore, we propose to utilize omnidirectional cameras in a symmetric video communication system and study how the shape of the display affects the performance of the panoramic video communication in remote collaboration. By conducting experiments with two conditions (omnidirectional camera + spherical display vs. omnidirectional camera + horizontally placed 2D flat display), we analyzed what is the impact of display types on 360° video communication. Our results show that the spherical display is slightly better and both types of displays have their advantages and disadvantages. The findings contribute to our understanding of how to design an environment for remote collaboration with a 360° shared view of spaces.

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  • Kei Kobayashi, Junichi Hoshino
    2019 Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 177-185
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 30, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This paper elucidates the method used for creating a media system that expresses the worship culture of shrines in terms of aspects such as divine messengers, enshrined deities, and manners with an emphasis on approachability for users from multiple generations and their affinity with the actual shrine grounds. To achieve this goal, we created an experience-based media system using video projection that incorporates a fusion of Japanese elements such as traditional Japanese paper and picture scrolls with the physical movements and object recognition. After setting it up within the actual shrine grounds, we have visitors and shrine staff members experience it for themselves and then consider the system’s acceptability and effectiveness.

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  • Takeshi Oozu, Aki Yamada, Hiroo Iwata
    2019 Volume 24 Issue 2 Pages 187-194
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 30, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In this article, we discuss the artwork about the device which has a furniture appearance and physical input and output functions. Since the chairs has most direct and frequent interaction “sitting” with the users in their daily life, we decided to shape a new interaction between them by making the furniture-shaped device “Escaping Chair”, which has a box stool appearance and interacts with the bystanders by trying to move away from nearby people. By doing this, the device tries to make a person unable to sit on it, stimulating their perception toward their sitting action, while also making the person consider the Chair’s “personality.” We exhibited the chair and collected feedback via conversation and observation. During exhibition, it succeeded in making subjects perceive their own movements and to feel a semblance of will in the chair during their interactions, as we planned, and even making them think alive. Also, they found its playfulness, which indicates a new capability of the device. Exhibition also raised further challenges to explore user interaction.

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