BioScience Trends
Online ISSN : 1881-7823
Print ISSN : 1881-7815
Advance online publication
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from Advance online publication
  • Umme Qulsum, Toshifumi Tsukahara
    Article ID: 2018.01178
    Published: 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: December 17, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Alternative splicing is a post- and co-transcriptional regulatory mechanism of gene expression. Pentatricopeptide repeat (PPR) family proteins were recently found to be involved in RNA editing in plants. The aim of this study was to investigate the tissue-specific expression and alternative splicing of PPR family genes and their effects on protein structure and functionality. Of the 27 PPR genes in Arabidopsis thaliana, we selected six PPR genes of the P subfamily that are likely alternatively spliced, which were confirmed by sequencing. Four of these genes show intron retention, and the two remaining genes have 3' alternative-splicing sites. Alternative-splicing events occurred in the coding regions of three genes and in the 3' UTRs of the three remaining genes. We also identified five previously unannotated alternatively spliced isoforms of these PPR genes, which were confirmed by PCR and sequencing. Among these, three contain 3' alternative-splicing sites, one contains a 5' alternative-splicing site, and the remaining gene contains a 3'-5' alternative-splicing site. The new isoforms of two genes affect protein structure, and three other alternative-splicing sites are located in 3' UTRs. These findings suggest that tissue-specific expression of different alternatively spliced transcripts occurs in Arabidopsis, even at different developmental stages.

    Download PDF (2632K)
  • Yanmei Peng, Qiang Li, Jingyi Zhang, Wen Shen, Xu Zhang, Chenyao Sun, ...
    Article ID: 2018.01246
    Published: 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: December 17, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    The past decades have witnessed a rapid increase in the use of molecularly targeted therapies. One class of agents includes the epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitors (EGFRIs), which afford patients longer progression-free survival (PFS) times, especially among non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and metastatic colorectal carcinoma (mCRC). Certain adverse effects, particularly skin toxicity, are mainly manifested as rash, xerosis, pruritus, nails changes, hair changes and mucositis. Previous studies reported the adverse events occurred based on the cutaneous inflammation reaction. Treatment recommended glucocorticoids and antibiotics. It is suggested that skin toxicity is an important issue because it usually affects patients' quality of life (QoL) and still causes dose reduction or discontinuation of targeted therapies. For these reasons, more and more oncologists and dermatologists recognize the importance of recognition and management of skin toxicities with the expansion in availability of EGFRIs. In this review, we conducted a systematic review of recent data to examine the types and frequencies of dermatologic toxicities associated with anti-epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) therapies in NSCLC and mCRC. In addition, we would like to explore the management and treatment options currently used by clinicians based on the possible mechanism.

    Download PDF (987K)
  • Kenji Karako, Yu Chen, Wei Tang
    Article ID: 2018.01264
    Published: 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: December 17, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Neural networks have garnered attention over the past few years. A neural network is a typical model of machine learning that is used to identify visual patterns. Neural networks are used to solve a wide variety of problems, including image recognition problems and time series prediction problems. In addition, neural networks have been applied to medicine over the past few years. This paper classifies the ways in which neural networks have been applied to medicine based on the type of data used to train those networks. Applications of neural networks to medicine can be categorized two types: automated diagnosis and physician aids. Considering the number of patients per physician, neural networks could be used to diagnose diseases related to the vascular system, heart, brain, spinal column, head, neck, and tumors/cancer in three fields: vascular and interventional radiology, interventional cardiology, and neuroradiology. Lastly, this paper also considers areas of medicine where neural networks can be effectively applied in the future.

    Download PDF (545K)
  • Harshal S Mandavdhare, Vishal Sharma, Harjeet Singh, Usha Dutta
    Article ID: 2018.01028
    Published: 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: July 15, 2018
    JOURNALS RESTRICTED ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION
    This withdrawal is for above article due to the misoperation of advance online publication.
    Download PDF (688K)
  • Olivier Audet, Hung Tien Bui, Maxime Allisse, Alain-Steve Comtois, Mar ...
    Article ID: 2018.01060
    Published: 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: July 15, 2018
    JOURNALS RESTRICTED ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION
    This withdrawal is for above article due to the misoperation of advance online publication.
    Download PDF (543K)
feedback
Top