Ann Gunma Health Sci
Online ISSN : 1343-4179
ISSN-L : 1343-4179
Current issue
Displaying 1-4 of 4 articles from this issue
  • 2023 Volume 43 Pages 0-
    Published: 2023
    Released on J-STAGE: March 30, 2023
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
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  • Mitsuko Ushikubo
    2023 Volume 43 Pages 1-8
    Published: 2023
    Released on J-STAGE: March 30, 2023
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to clarify nursing students' opinions on the use of online system in home care nursing practice. Forty-eight third-year nursing students from University A in 2021 were surveyed using a questionnaire. The question items were on the orientation and final conference held by the visiting nursing station and learning the actual practice of home care nursing. As a result, the students emphasized the importance of being able to ask and answer questions and exchange opinions among instructors and students. Regarding the orientation and final conference, most of them agreed that this could be done online as well. On the other hand, opinions were divided among the students regarding the actual practice of home nursing. If done online, technical trainings need to be organized. The home care nursing practice could increase the breadth and depth of student learning by utilizing online as well as on-site.
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  • Rika Takiguchi, Shiomi Kanaizumi
    2023 Volume 43 Pages 9-17
    Published: 2023
    Released on J-STAGE: March 30, 2023
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    The aims of this study were to explore trends in research regarding support for breastfeeding in NICUs, and to discuss future challenges related to this topic. A literature review was conducted by searching the Japana Centra Revuo Medicina Web using ‘neonatal ICU’, ‘breastfeeding’ and ‘nurse’ as key words. Twelve articles were identified and analyzed. In terms of study design, quantitative descriptive and hypothesis testing designs were most frequent, counting four for each. The study subjects were predominantly NICU staff, while a few studies analyzed obstetrics ward staff or the neonates’ mothers. Qualitative inductive analysis revealed the following five categories of research content: actual situation of breastfeeding support in NICUs, factors affecting the continuation of breastfeeding by mothers who are separated from their babies, effect of staff education with regard to breastfeeding, collaboration between the NICU and obstetrics ward for providing breastfeeding support, and feelings of the mother as the receiver of breastfeeding support. The studies clarified that NICU staff tend to lack confidence in providing breastfeeding support, making it difficult for them to provide support, and that although staff education enhances staff confidence in providing support, utilization of midwives who are equipped with the professional knowledge and skill is also required for improving their support technique. Perceptions and perceived difficulties among staff constitute a topic to be explored in future research, to extend the implementation of breastfeeding support.
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  • Rika Ishizeki, Etsuko Saito, Maiko Senuma, Ayumi Kyota, Noriko Tsukago ...
    2023 Volume 43 Pages 18-26
    Published: 2023
    Released on J-STAGE: March 30, 2023
    JOURNAL OPEN ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to obtain suggestions for nursing by reviewing the literature on nurses' decision-making support regarding treatment and recuperation for adolescent cancer patients. Using the Central Journal of Medicine, we searched for “adolescent”, “pediatric”, and “cancer” by combining “decision making” or “informed consent”, “informed assent”, and “nursing”, and included six studies that matched the research objectives. The six target literature were organized and classified into review sheets. As a result, as a decision-making support for adolescent cancer patients, nurses provided explanations according to the child's level of understanding and psychological state, respected the child's wishes and intentions, and created an environment where the child did not feel lonely and could consult at any time. The nurse explained the disease, treatment, and what could happen to their body in the future in a way that was tailored to each child, according to the child's level of understanding and psychological state. In addition, although adolescent children are still under parental advocacy, their parents' opinions are more likely to be reflected, but nurses tried to understand their children's wishes, intentions, and how to express their intentions. In addition, they created opportunities for them to think together when choosing from the information provided and to share their feelings with the adults around them, and created an environment that supports children not only by nurses but also by various professions such as clinical psychologists.
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