Japanese Journal of Social Pharmacy
Online ISSN : 2188-2754
Print ISSN : 0911-0585
ISSN-L : 0911-0585
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Displaying 1-8 of 8 articles from this issue
Preface
Original Aricles
  • Akira Mitoya, Ryota Kumaki, Ryoo Taniguchi, Mitsuhiro Someya, Ryuichi ...
    2024 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 2-11
    Published: June 10, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: June 18, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    To promote the stockpiling of regular medicines for disasters (SMD), we investigated SMD rates and clarified the relationship between SMD status (Yes or No) and the characteristics of patients with chronic diseases. A survey was provided to patients visiting the pharmacies in Hokkaido. SMD was defined as a patient having a supply of regular medicine for 7 days or more and replacing with new medicine within one year. Of a total of 537 participants (51.0% male; mean age 65.8 years), 61.1% had experienced a major disaster. The SMD rate was extremely low at 15.3%. The median score for a patient’s understanding of the regular medicine names (5-point scale: 1=hardly understood, 5=almost understood) was 2. The median number of monthly pharmacy visits was 0.8. 5.4% were recommended SMD by physicians or pharmacists. Results from multiple logistic regression analysis indicated that positive patient characteristics included age (OR=1.154, 95%CI [1.026-1.298], P=0.017), understanding of the regular medicine names (1.724, [1.039-2.859], P=0.035), and recommendation of SMD by physicians or pharmacists (5.991, [2.616-13.722], P<0.001). A negative patient characteristic was the number of pharmacy visits (0.587, [0.383-0.899], P=0.014). The most influential positive factor was the recommendation of SMD by physicians or pharmacists; however, only 5.4% of the participants had experienced this. The findings of this study indicated important that health care providers and the government to work together to devise easy-to-understand measures to inform local residents about the importance of SMD and how to them, conduct educational activities.

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  • Masahiro Yamada, Koji Tokumo, Yasuhiro Hirata, Daiju Tsuchiya, Masahir ...
    2024 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 12-21
    Published: June 10, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: June 18, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Health support activities for residents were held three times during a period from June, 2016 to November, 2017. The residents registered in order to participate through 11 community pharmacies. Participant’s blood pressure values were measured at the venue of health support activities by pharmacists. The blood pressure values in 66 of the 106 participants were analyzed, excluding 40 participants receiving medical treatment. The rate of participants with hypertension, systolic blood pressure (SBP)≧140 mmHg or diastolic blood pressure (DBP)≧90 mmHg, was 32% (21/66). Of those with hypertension, 43% (9/21) had hypertension of a high risk level, SBP≧160 mmHg or DBP≧100 mmHg. Pharmacists provided lifestyle counseling and encouraged them to make changes in order to achieve tighter blood pressure control. The data of their blood pressure values were provided to community pharmacies for continuing support of their blood pressure control. With the pharmacist’s support, the median value of blood pressure of participants who had hypertension decreased in the second event. In addition, 50% (3/6) of participants who attended the second event with hypertension of high risk level, visited the hospital for a consultation with a doctor after getting pharmacist’s advice. These results indicate that greater access to community pharmacists improved blood pressure control of residents with hypertension. However, there were many residents who consider it difficult to use pharmacies without a prescription. Hence, friendly relationship to residents on their utilizing pharmacies is needed for providing them lifestyle counseling such as preventing hypertension by pharmacists.

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Research Note
  • Chika Kiyozuka, Ryota Kumaki, Kimihiko Sato, Naoko Sueishi, Minami Wat ...
    2024 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 22-30
    Published: June 10, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: June 18, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    In order for pharmacists to be collaboratively involved with patients in pharmacotherapy, there is a need to improve patients’ understanding of pharmacists’ involvement in extended pharmacotherapy, i.e., their interpersonal work. This study explores the factors that affect patients’ perceptions of pharmacists’ interpersonal work. A survey on patients’ perceptions of pharmacists’ interpersonal work was conducted among 450 patients aged 20 years or older who visited a pharmacy. Logistic regression analysis was performed with low and high patient perceptions of pharmacists’ interpersonal work as the objective variables. Valid responses were obtained from 350 participants. More than half of the respondents did not understand the nature of the interpersonal work of pharmacists. Patients who were unaware of pharmacists checking for side effects were more prevalent than those who were unaware of other interpersonal work. Explanations from the family pharmacist (OR=2.25, P=0.033) and trust in the pharmacist (OR=1.11, P=0.001) had a positive influence on patients’ perceptions of the pharmacist’s interpersonal tasks. As pharmacy pharmacists are increasingly becoming more involved with patients’ drug treatment and to ensure safe drug treatment practices for patients, it is considered important for pharmacists to actively explain their involvement in drug treatment to patients. This will be conducive to building trusting relationships, and for pharmacists to fulfil their function as family pharmacists.

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Reports
  • Shoji Sera, Ayumu Furuya, Yoshiki Kameda, Akira Okada, Naomi Nagai
    2024 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 31-39
    Published: June 10, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: June 18, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    The package inserts revision regarding prescription drugs is an ongoing process. In this study, we examined the status of this revision and how the content of the information provided has been updated with the new instructions, including the rationale for contraindications for pregnant and breast-feeding women. A total of 407 prescription drugs for pregnant and breast-feeding women were contraindicated, accounting for approximately 15% of the 2,627 nonproprietary names. The number of contraindicated drugs for pregnant, breast-feeding, and both pregnant and breast-feeding women were 406, 44, and 43, respectively. The majority of the contraindications were based on nonclinical data, such as teratogenicity and fetotoxicity data in reproductive toxicity studies involving pregnant animals and pharmacokinetic information in breast-feeding animals. The overall revision rate for the new instructions was 16.2% after three years of revision work for each drug. The alert wording has been revised to provide more clarity and consistency, with three categories of statements: “should not be administered/avoid breastfeeding,” “advisable not to administer/breastfeed,” and “should be administered/breastfeed in consideration of the therapeutic benefit (benefit-risk consideration).” The statement indicating that the drug should not be administered to pregnant women remained in the revised instructions. Conversely, the revision of the description for breast-feeding women from “should be discontinued/avoided” to “benefit-risk consideration” may have improved the usefulness of the product, allowing healthcare professionals to make more informed decisions after considering the transfer of the drug into milk, its pharmacological effects, and other factors.

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  • Yukiko Fukuda, Kouichi Hosomi, Shouhei Okano, Takahiro Yamaguchi, Hiro ...
    2024 Volume 43 Issue 1 Pages 40-47
    Published: June 10, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: June 18, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    To assess the safety of molnupiravir capsules (MOV) and the adherence of patients taking these capsules, we conducted a survey of patients who were dispensed MOV at the Maruzen Pharmacy from January 1st to September 30th, 2022. In the survey, a sample of 134 patients were requested to complete a questionnaire, from whom we received 56 responses (response rate: 41.8%). Among the respondents, 11 (19.6%) failed to complete their medication, and those aged 60 years or older tended to have poor adherence (P<0.001). Apart from age, we detected no statistical differences with respect to other assessed factors (gender, capsule size, occurrence of side effects, and evaluation of pharmacist’s explanations). Side effects were reported by 11 individuals (19.6%) taking the drug, although these were mainly consistent with those that have been reported in clinical trials. In addition, 20 individuals (35.7%) experienced COVID-19 after-effects after taking MOV. When requested to evaluate pharmacies and pharmacists, five individuals (8.9%) reported feeling dissatisfied. Although the results obtained in this survey are based on a limited number of patients, they do reveal a concerning lack of adherence among patients over 60 years of age; and there are needs for future improvements in the size of MOV capsules.

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