Internal Medicine
Online ISSN : 1349-7235
Print ISSN : 0918-2918
ISSN-L : 0918-2918
ORIGINAL ARTICLES
Risk Factors for Hospital-acquired Bacteremia
Takuhiro YOSHIDAKenji TSUSHIMAAyako TSUCHIYANoriko NISHIKAWAKumiko SHIRAHATAKazuma KANEKOKen-ichi ITOHirotaka KAWAKAMIShin-ichi NAKAGAWAToshiro SUZUKIKeishi KUBOShu-ichi IKEDA
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JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

2005 Volume 44 Issue 11 Pages 1157-1162

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Abstract

Objective Bacteremia is one of the most serious health problems associated with high morbidity and mortality. The aim of this study was to identify risk factors for bacteremia in daily medical care to facilitate rapid and accurate clinical decisions about treatment.
Patients and Methods We studied 306 inpatients retrospectively. Age, peripheral neutrophil count, C-reactive protein (CRP), platelets, serum total cholesterol, total protein, albumin and cholinesterase were compared in patients with positive- and negative-blood cultures. The associations between blood culture positivity and glucose tolerance, bedridden state, presence of a central venous catheter (CVC) or urinary catheter were examined. On October 14, 2002, strategies for prevention of catheter-related infection were altered in our hospital. We studied the impact of these changes on the risk of bacteremia.
Results Sixty-seven patients had positive and 239 had negative blood cultures. Age, neutrophil, platelets, total protein, albumin, and cholinesterase were significantly different between the culture-positive patients and the culture-negative patients. Multivariate analysis showed albumin and platelets as independent predictors. The bedridden state and catheter-inserted states (central venous or urinary) conferred significantly higher positive blood culture rates. Multivariate analysis showed using urinary catheters and indwelling femoral CVCs as independent risk factors. There was no significant difference in the blood culture-positive rate before and after the change in prevention strategies; before the change, 6 of 9 catheter-inserted blood culture-positive cases yielded MRSA, while 4 of 12 cultures yielded Staphylococcus epidermidis after the change.
Conclusion Our study highlights the risk factors of bacteremia in vulnerable patients.

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© 2005 by The Japanese Society of Internal Medicine
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