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JAPANESE CIRCULATION JOURNAL
Vol. 65 (2001) No. 5 P 395-398

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http://doi.org/10.1253/jcj.65.395

Clinical Investigation

Sixteen patients with mild to moderate heart failure were examined to investigate whether sympathetic deactivation plays a role in the improvement in the failing heart by chronic angiotensin converting enzyme (ACE) inhibition. Measurements, including echocardiography, blood examinations, neurohumoral samplings (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), norepinephrine), and spectral heart rate variability analysis by Holter electrocardiography, were carried out before and 6 months after the administration of lisinopril (5-10 mg/day). Quality of life assessment was accomplished by the Specific Activity Scale (SAS) questionnaire. Treatment with lisinopril for 6 months resulted in a significant reduction in systolic blood pressure. The left ventricular diastolic dimension significantly decreased and fractional shortening significantly increased on echocardiography. Of the 16 patients, 8 had improvement in their symptoms as measured by the SAS. Lisinopril did not significantly reduce the plasma norepinephrine concentration, but there was a significant reduction in the plasma ANP and BNP concentrations. In the heart rate power spectral analysis, total spectral power, high-frequency components and low/high frequency ratios did not change significantly with lisinopril. The mechanism by which ACE inhibitors improve mild to moderate heart failure is not by suppressing sympathetic activity. (Jpn Circ J 2001; 65: 395 - 398)

Copyright © 2001 THE JAPANESE CIRCULATION SOCIETY

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