Japanese Journal of Social Psychology
Online ISSN : 2189-1338
Print ISSN : 0916-1503
ISSN-L : 0916-1503
Articles
Exploring the potential of the practice of Inochi-tendenko in current disaster prevention education: The interaction effect of teachers’ attitudes toward disaster prevention education and the organizational climate in schools
Kaede MaedaHirofumi Hashimoto
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2020 Volume 35 Issue 3 Pages 91-98

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Abstract

Considering the immense damage caused by natural disasters in recent years, a reevaluation of current disaster prevention education should be regarded as a matter of urgency to ensure it is of a satisfactory standard. Assuming it to be an effective response in the event of a disaster, the current study focused on the Japanese practice of Inochi-tendenko, which means to run away independently to safety when disaster strikes while thinking solely about one’s safety, and investigated, through a web survey, teachers’ attitudes toward promoting this practice as a new approach to disaster prevention education. The results from 219 public elementary and junior high schoolteachers demonstrated that, while most teachers perceived current disaster prevention education as adequate, they were also aware that such education needed to be reformed. Also, it was observed that 52.1% of teachers knew the practice of Inochi-tendenko and generally accepted the idea of its incorporation into public disaster prevention education. Furthermore, we found that 1) an awareness of the need for reform, as an individual factor, was associated with a positive attitude towards promoting the practice of Inochi-tendenko, 2) there was a nonnegligible organizational climate effect towards positivity in promoting the practice of Inochi-tendenko, and 3) the interaction effect of these suggested that a collegial organizational climate was necessary for promoting the practice of Inochi-tendenko as a new and more adequate approach to disaster prevention education.

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© 2020 The Japanese Society of Social Psychology
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