Spine Surgery and Related Research
Online ISSN : 2432-261X
ISSN-L : 2432-261X
ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Life expectancy after cervical laminoplasty-Causes of the fatal prognosis at the early stage (within 5 years) -
Yoshiharu KawaguchiMasato NakanoTaketoshi YasudaShoji SekiKayo SuzukiYasuhito YaharaHiroto MakinoMasahiko KanamoriTomoatsu Kimura
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JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

2017 Volume 1 Issue 4 Pages 174-178

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Abstract

Introduction: In more than 20 years' follow-up after cervical laminoplasty, some patients died at an early stage, within 5 years postoperatively. The details remain unclear. This study was conducted to elucidate the clinical features in patients who died at an early stage after cervical laminoplasty to determine possible preventive measures against early death after surgery.

Methods: A total of 74 patients who died with the follow-up period were included. The patients were divided into two groups: patients with a short survival period (S group, died ≤5 years after surgery) and patients with a long survival period (L group, died >5 years after surgery). Diseases, gender, age, causes of the death, general complications before surgery, and the pre- and postoperative JOA scores were compared between the two groups.

Results: Eleven patients (15%) died within 5 years after laminoplasty. The average age at death in the S group was 68.7 years which was considerably younger than that in the L group (80.2 years). The ratio of pneumonia was higher in the S group, compared to that in the L group. Postoperative JOA score in the S group was lower than that in the L group.

Conclusions: 11 patients out of 74 patients (15%) died within 5 years after laminoplasty. The average age at the death in the S group was much younger than that in the L group. The postoperative JOA score in the S group was lower than that in the L group. As pneumonia was more prevalent in the S group, it might be reasonable to give the information for the protection of pneumonia after cervical laminoplasty.

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© 2017 The Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research.

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