Japanese Journal of Communication Studies
Online ISSN : 2020-2063
Print ISSN : 2188-7721
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Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from the selected issue
Articles
  • Junko Miyamoto, Yasushi Masuda
    2019 Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 5-27
    Published: November 30, 2019
    Released: December 03, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This paper presents characteristics of “interactive” communication to promote innovation. In recent years, many researchers have shown interest in “interactive” communication in science and technology communities as a means of promoting innovation. However, collaboration and “interactive” communication do not guarantee success, which is dependent on the quality of the communication and the methods employed. This paper investigates the development of successful collaboration in the field of innovative technology. We examined the specific case of removing old paint using laser beams to elucidate an “interactive” communication method that promotes innovation. We conducted three in-depth interviews with key members of the development team and a group interview involving all participants and analyzed and interpreted the data using the framework of “Katari=Antenarrative” theory. As a result, the following factors were identified as characteristics of “interactive” communication promoting innovation: “chains of awareness and meaning transformation in a ternary relationship,” “Katari to create empathy,” “mutual responsiveness,” and “listener’s flexibility.” Furthermore, we brought up “Katari-tsutae” as a new concept of “Katari=Antenarrative” theory. In conclusion, we suggest that innovation will be promoted by recognizing and practicing these four characteristics of “interactive” communication when working on technology development.

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  • Koichi Kinoshita
    2019 Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 29-48
    Published: November 30, 2019
    Released: December 03, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Audio Visual Translation (AVT) is essential for importing and exporting moving pictures overseas. Dubbing and subtitling are the two processes involved in AVT. While dubbing is mainstream in Japanese terrestrial TV broadcasting, this was not the case at its inception. Dubbing emerged as a way to facilitate interaction between senders and audiences. This research investigated the dubbing process in NET (Nippon-Educational-Television, current TV Asahi). NET was the forerunner of AVT in Japanese TV from the 1950s to the 1970s. The translation norms of the sender were clarified by analyzing chronological changes in the form of the AVT used and the interaction between senders and audiences in Japanese TV. The study draws the following conclusions: 1) A significant degree of overlap exists between accountability and expectancy norms. The strength of expectancy norms was emphasized by Chesterman (1997) and was verified by this study. 2) Comprehension and naturalness used to be viewed as the standard in expectancy norms. However, the growing emphasis on richness and identity of expression overtook these previously held standards. 3) The norms were found to be stronger for adult programs and theater-movies than for children’s programs and television movies.

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  • Machiko Yamamoto
    2019 Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 49-65
    Published: November 30, 2019
    Released: December 03, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The purpose of this essay is to rethink how not only the participants of social movement, but also journalists and scholars have directed their eye gaze towards “others.” This essay analyzes the experience of the “elderly” who have engaged with the Okinawa Issue in both Okinawa and Tokyo. It attempts to consider the process of seeking a way to govern their own bodies, languages, and feelings in order to avoid being absorbed into the politics of the nation-state. By examining these experiences in retrospect, one can observe the ramifications resulting from the birth of new ways in the governing of the body, especially for the “young” and the majority of the local populace—who have been observed to be content with their “safe” position despite the exclusion of others from their society.

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