Japanese Journal of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Online ISSN : 2424-1652
Print ISSN : 0289-0968
ISSN-L : 0289-0968
Volume 58 , Issue 5
Showing 1-28 articles out of 28 articles from the selected issue
The 57th Congress of The Society for Child and Adolescent Psychiatry at Okayama Convention Center
Perspective of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry
Symposium 1: Diagnosis and Treatment for the Comorbidity of ADHD
Symposium 2: Life Cycle Consideration of Child and Adolescent Psychiatry -Liaisons with Other Specialities-
Symposium 3: Current Opinion on Rehabilitation of Autism Spectrum Disorder
Symposium 4: Pros and Cons of Pharmaceutical Treatment on Children
Symposium 5: Supporting Children Victims of Sexual Abuse -What Welfare and Medical Care Should Do-
Symposium 6: Essential Perspective for Psychiatric Care for Children After Disasters -From Medium- To Long-Term Stratified Viewpoints-
Original Article
  • Yasuko FUNABIKI, Toshiya MURAI
    2017 Volume 58 Issue 5 Pages 713-729
    Published: November 01, 2017
    Released: August 21, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Objective: This study was designed to standardize a Japanese version of the Child Behavior Checklist for Ages 1½-5 (CBCL/1½-5) and the Caregiver-Teacher Report Form (C-TRF) based on standardization protocol used for the original Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA) (2000).

    Method: T scores were calculated from the raw scores of 1,422 participants (boys; 699, girls; 723) for all syndrome scales (emotionally reactive, anxious/depressed, somatic complaints, withdrawn, sleep problems, attention problems, and aggressive behavior) of the CBCL/1½-5, and from scores of 337 participants (boys; 150, girls; 187) for the C-TRF. T scores were also computed for the upper scales of Internalizing, Externalizing, and Total problems. Reliability and validity of all scales of both the CBCL/1½-5 and C-TRF were assessed with Cronbach's alpha coefficient and inter-correlations. Additionally, confirmatory factor analysis (CFA) was used to investigate the goodness-of-fit for each factor. We also conducted multiple regression analyses of the CBCL/1½-5 syndrome scales to check for effects of gender and age group.

    Results and Conclusion: Total average Cronbach's alpha was .73 for the CBCL/1½-5 and .72 for the C-TRF, with good internal consistency and significant positive inter-correlation within scales in both the CBCL/1½-5 and C-TRF. Fit indices of CFA were reasonably adequate other than that for the Externalizing scales of the C-TRF. Multiple regression analysis of the CBCL/1½-5 revealed significant effect of boys on the “emotionally reactive,” “withdrawn,” “attention problems,” and “aggressive behavior” scales. In terms of age group, the younger age group had significant effect on the “sleep problems,” “attention problems,” and “aggressive behavior” scales; the older age group had significant effect on the “anxious/depressed” and “withdrawn” scales.

    Summary: Standardization of a Japanese version of these ASEBA questionnaires will contribute to a more comprehensive determination of behavioral problems among preschoolers in Japan, while also enabling comparison with findings from other nations with different historical and cultural backgrounds.

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  • Yasuko FUNABIKI, Toshiya MURAI
    2017 Volume 58 Issue 5 Pages 730-741
    Published: November 01, 2017
    Released: August 21, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Objective: This study was designed to standardize a Japanese version of the Youth Self-Report (School Ages 11-18 years) based on standardization protocol used for the original Achenbach System of Empirically Based Assessment (ASEBA).

    Method: We divided 889 participants into two groups based on gender: 440 boys and 449 girls. T scores were calculated from the raw scores of all scales: anxious/depressed, withdrawn/depressed, somatic complaints, social problems, thought problems, attention problems, rule-breaking behaviors, aggressive behaviors, Internalizing, Externalizing, and Total problems. Scale reliability and validity were assessed with Cronbach's alpha coefficient, inter-correlations, and by comparison with the high-functioning Autism Spectrum Screening Questionnaire (ASSQ). Effects of gender were tested by regression analysis of the syndrome scales.

    Results and Conclusion: Results showed that the total average Cronbach's alpha was .81, indicating good internal consistency. Additionally, validities were confirmed by significant positive correlation between all scales as well as with the ASSQ. Results of regression analysis showed significant effect of “boys” on “attention problems,” “rule-breaking behavior,” and “aggressive behavior.”

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Research Data
  • Akira TAKEI, Taro SUZUKI, Tomoyo DOI, Hitoshi DOI, Takeshi TOMIOKA, Ak ...
    2017 Volume 58 Issue 5 Pages 742-756
    Published: November 01, 2017
    Released: August 21, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Data on the employment status of adults diagnosed with autistic spectrum disorder (ASD) in childhood or adolescence are scarce. Therefore, this study was designed to clarify the employment status of ASD patients receiving continuous psychiatric care into adulthood. Among the patients with ASD who presented at our department for the first time at age 18 or younger, 56 patients (21 men and 35 women) continuing to visit our clinic as adults were selected for this investigation on employment status. The mean age of patients at the time of study was 24.1 years, and the mean duration of follow-up was 9.3 years. Diagnoses according to the DSM-IV-TR were autistic disorder in 8 patients (14.3%), Asperger's disorder in 19 (33.9%), and pervasive development disorder not otherwise specified in 29 (51.8%). Regarding educational background, 39 patients (69.6%) were high school graduates or above. Comorbidities were observed at initial visit in all 56 patients, school non-attendance being the most common disorder (n=48, 85.7%). On the other hand, comorbidities were observed in 32 patients (57.1%) as adults, with social withdrawal being the most common (n=15, 26.8%). As for employment status, 15 patients were employed (26.8%) (three full-time, 5.4%), 17 patients were visiting employment support centers on a regular basis (30.4%), and 24 patients were unemployed (42.9%). There were significantly fewer comorbidities in patients who were employed. The findings demonstrated that few patients with ASD receiving continued psychiatric care as adults had attained regular employment and independent living, despite being high-functioning individuals. The results also suggested the presence of comorbidity as a possible factor influencing long-term outcome for patients with ASD, highlighting the need to provide seamless support to patients with high-functioning ASD requiring continuous psychiatric care past adolescence, on to adulthood.

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