Journal of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology
Online ISSN : 1883-3659
Print ISSN : 0044-0183
Volume 2 , Issue 14
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
  • Tomoo Royama
    1960 Volume 2 Issue 14 Pages 1-17
    Published: June 20, 1960
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    1) The present paper dealt with the problems of line transects in animal ecology. Several methods of the use of line transects were compared with one another and criticised both from the theoretical and practical point of view.
    2) The densities of certain woodland bird populations were estimated by census and sample counts at the same time and in the same place. When the results were compared a serious discrepancy was observed between the density determined by complete census and the density determined by sample counts and mathematical calculation.
    3) It was concluded that the discrepancy was probably due to the variability of conspicuousness of the birds. The influence of conspicuousness of the animals on the results obtained by sample counts was discussed under the assumption that conspicuousness may vary not only with the species, with the observer, with the habitat, and with the distance, but also with the speed of the animals.
    4) The methods of line transects were classified from a practical stand point according to what kinds of animals are to be sampled. The precautions to be taken in the application of each method was also suggested.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1960 Volume 2 Issue 14 Pages 18-29
    Published: June 20, 1960
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    Observations on the roosting behaviour and the change of roost during and after breeding are reported. In conclusion, the factors for selecting roost are as follows: 1) Safety and the environment, 2) Presence of both roosting and gathering places, 3) Kind of plants, 4) Size of roost, 5) Correlation with flock size. Although there existed many bamboo thickets, those selected for roosts were always adjacent to the rice paddies which made them less easily approached by man. The kind of roost was, beside bamboo thicket, reed beds of river side, desiduous trees as well as pine trees. These roosts were not necessarily selected seasonally, though in winter bamboo thickets were always used. It also seems that they determine the roost size by their flock size, thus in August, a flock of about 400 birds used the extensive bamboo thicket (as in winter) in 1955, but less than 100 birds roosted in the pine trees nearby, in July, 1956 and August, 1954.
    The factors for change of roost may be as follows: 1) Environmental factors (a. Change of feeding grounds, b. Movement of the flock due to a), 2) Natural or human factors, 3) "Special attraction, " 4) Overpopulation ("flooding effect"), 5) Following effect and mono-flock preference (psychological). It was observed that until the rice plant around the winter roost is cut rather extensively, this roost had no value other than a part of the feeding ground, because a flock feeding at a fruit tree within that roost flew off in the evening to other roost used in this season (summer). When the rice plant at the feeding ground of the breeding area become fully grown, the flock moved north to the vegetable fields and changed the roost. This change of feeding ground and roosting place seems to be directly correlated, rather than secondarily determined by the distance of old and new roosts from the new feeding ground. A suggestive case was encountered in which a typhoon might have caused the change of roost, and human persevierance should also become a cause. The attachment of next-boxes near the spring roost has apparently given a "special attraction" to the starlings, because this roost was maintained in the second year until summer, the season in which they used to abandon that roost in the previous years. This resulted the overpopulation at this roost and by "flooding effect" the flock was splitted into two, each thereafter roosting at two new roosts about 4km. apart. In this case, the original roost was perfectly abandoned showing their mono-flock preference. In splitting up the flock they gradually established new roosts by following the others and some confusion was observed, especially in young birds, in their behaviour of undecision (an usual behaviour in changing the roost). They start to a roost but soon circle back, or swing to the direction of the other roost or sometimes take a zigzag course between the two destinations, while the "back flight" from the roost where they have just arrived was often observed.
    An additional note on the feeding behaviour is given. In autumn, sparrows and starlings gather together at rice paddies, but eat different foods. Especially, the starlings search for rice worms from cut stems both remaining on the ground and hung from the poles.
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  • Ikuo Kanai
    1960 Volume 2 Issue 14 Pages 30-40
    Published: June 20, 1960
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    The House Swallow, Hirundo rustica, first arrives S. Japan in mid. March and the main flock occurs in Honshiu in early April. 2. In Hachioji, Tokyo, the peak of nesting is mid. April, the earliest 31 March. The percent nesting was 8% and the nesting period 8 days. Sixty percent of pairs used the old nests; worked for nesting chiefly during the forenoon and harder they worked for new nest. 3. The peak of laying occured in late April, the earliest the 8th. The clutch size 3-7, with the mean 5, and larger in the first broods. 4. The egg is laid daily between 5-7 a. m. 5. The egg size measured 21×15cm, 1.4g. 6. The peak season of hatching was late May. The incubation period was 14 days for the 1st and 12 days for the 2nd broods; the average brood size at hatching 4.7. 7. The feeding frequency per hour was average 32 times during the for-and 27 times afternoon. 8. The chick's weight was: 3rd day 5g., 6th day 12.5g, 9th day 16.7g. and 15th day 19.4g. The adult weigh 18g. 9. The chicks flew most in mid. June, early example on 20 May. They flew from nest led by a parent on fine day between 10-12 a. m. Average flying brood size 4.5 chicks; the fledging period was 21 days for both 1st and 2nd broods but when counted from the date of the laying of 1st egg, it was 39 days for the 1st and 36 days for the 2nd broods. 10. The percent damage from total of eggs laid was 27%. 11. The banding resulted 9.1% recovery of adults and 1.4% of young birds.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1960 Volume 2 Issue 14 Pages 41-49
    Published: June 20, 1960
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The author took note on this intestinal lymphatic divertikel of birds, which is known as the remain of the duct of yolk sac of chick stage. The presence or absence of the divertikel in adults, the length, distance from gizzard and the position (ratio of this distance for total length of intestine) are given, and the histological observation on two samples, which shows the lymphatic nodules, is reported. As has been discussed by other authors, it remains as a general rule in the nidifugous and water or terrestrial birds and in those which has developed caeca, but with exceptions in each case. These rather many exceptions indicate that this divertikel, though in some cases it shows secondary development, is not considered very significant functionally and adaptively.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1960 Volume 2 Issue 14 Pages 50-59
    Published: June 20, 1960
    Released: November 10, 2008
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    M. pectoralis major of birds in general consists of M. pect. m. proprius and lateralis (Kuroda, '60) and in soaring birds such as some hawks and the Tubinares a distinct deep-seated layer, M. pect. m. profundus (white muscle in the Tubinares) (Kuroda, 1. c.), is differentiated. The M. p. m. lateralis, generally ignored, is an important part in flight in pulling backward the wing (humerus) struck down by M. p. m. proprius, thus giving the propelling effect to the wing. Comparison of this part of the pectoral muscles in various groups of birds is shown in Plate 1. The comparative weight of M. p. m. profundus (Fig. 3, H, I, L, N) in some species of the Tubinares is listed; it is best developed in the albatross in which the M. p. minor (M. supracoracoideus) is the smallest. The relative weight of entire pectoral muscles to the body weight and that of small pectoral muscle to large pectoral are listed by Orders of birds. As a rule smaller species of a group of birds generally have more developed small pectoral relative to large pectoral. The former muscle is least developed in some hawks and the Tubinares which are soarers and best developed in the wing-diving sea-birds, the Alcidae. Their relative development is heighly adaptive to the way of flight. In the herons, an anterior superficial layer of the M. p. m. proprius can be distinguished, and this was named, the M. pect. major antero-superficialis.
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  • Masanori Uramoto, Shinji Takano
    1960 Volume 2 Issue 14 Pages 60-62
    Published: June 20, 1960
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The breeding success of Great Tit, Parus major, was investigated at Musashi Imperial Tomb Area in 1959. 80 nest-boxes were provided per 50 m-grid. The number of nests initiated were 26 and the nests at which the clutch completed were 10. The clutch sizes were somewhat larger in early than in late clutches, though not statistically significant. The nest from which the nestlings fledged was only one. This very low breeding success is remarkable.
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  • Nagahisa Kuroda
    1960 Volume 2 Issue 14 Pages 63-66
    Published: June 20, 1960
    Released: November 10, 2008
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The tibial muscles of an adult male ostrich which died at Ueno Zoo, Tokyo, 1959, was examined. Unfortunately, only the muscles of the right leg was available and they were already cut at the heel joint, and the time was not enough for detail examination. Of the 13 tibial muscles to be found in oridinal birds, nine (if M. perforatus et perforans digiti II and III (Fig. 1, E) are separated, ten) were present and are briefly described. The total muscle weight was 5.950gm, M. gastrocnemius and M. peroneus longus, especially the former, were extremely developed completely enveloping the hole proximal part of the tibia. Other muscles, mostly with tendon to toes and also M. tibialis anterior which lifts the tarsus, were only weakly developed. These conditions are adaptations for the use of heavy tarsus solely for running. But, the general muscular system, though simplified, was similar to that of ordinal avian type.
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