Primate Research Supplement
The 31th Congress Primate Society of Japan
Showing 1-50 articles out of 156 articles from the selected issue
Workshop
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Workshop
    Session ID: AW1
    Published: 2015
    Released: February 02, 2016
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
  • Rafaela S. C. TAKESHITA
    Type: Workshop
    Session ID: BW1
    Published: 2015
    Released: February 02, 2016
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Hall B (International Conference Hall II)

    Animals used for entertainment has a long history dating back thousands of years. Archaeological evidence as far back as 2,000 B.C. in Macedonia show that lions were kept in cages. Nowadays, performances using whales, dolphins, horses, and non-human primates are very popular around the world. These species are used for entertainment in several different arenas, from zoos, theme parks, circuses to small scale illegal shows. However, a dichotomy exists in the training of animals, where either a positive reinforcement or punishment contingency is used. Some entertainment purposes have included violent shows, animals exoticized as objects of curiosity, and the anthropomorphization of animals through training and the modification of appearances. In Jakarta, for example, poverty drove the local population to train monkeys to take part in street performances wearing masks and to perform activities such as shopping, riding bicycles and other simulations of human behavior. Scientists have raised several concerns about the training techniques used and the physiological impact on these animals, such as injuries caused by the harsh training or due to financial restriction that does not allow the owners to provide a proper veterinarian care to the animals. In Japan, on the other hand, the monkey performance began as a religious ritual during which a trained monkey danced to music in order to cure horses. Through the years, trainers strived to culturalize the animal by teaching the bipedal posture, and this tradition remains nowadays in the streets as part of Japanese culture. Nevertheless, morphologists are concerned with the changes associated with training animals to mimic "human-like" behaviors. Studies have shown that the long-term training of Japanese monkeys to maintain upright posture introduced marked lumbar lordosis in monkeys. Bone remodeling in the postcranial skeleton also evidenced functional adaptations for stresses induced by sustained bipedalism. The aim of this workshop is to introduce the history and the consequences of animal usage for entertainment, focusing on street monkeys in Japan and abroad, and to raise a general discussion from cultural and welfare perspectives.

    Tentative schedule: 3 talks (25 min each + 5 min questions) followed by discussion
    Organizers: Rafaela S. C. TAKESHITA, Sofia BERNSTEIN, Prof. Masaki TOMONAGA, Prof. Takakazu YUMOTO (Kyoto University)
    Contact: Rafaela S. C. TAKESHITA (Primate Research Institute, Kyoto University), rafaela.takeshita.32c@st.kyoto-u.ac.jp
    Download PDF (908K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Workshop
    Session ID: CW1
    Published: 2015
    Released: February 02, 2016
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
  • Michio NAKAMURA
    Type: Workshop
    Session ID: AW2
    Published: 2015
    Released: February 02, 2016
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
    Organizer: Michio NAKAMURA (Kyoto University), Kazuhiko HOSAKA (Kamakura Women's University), Noriko ITOH (Kyoto University), Koichiro ZAMMA (Kyoto Uni-versity)
    Download PDF (925K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Workshop
    Session ID: BW2
    Published: 2015
    Released: February 02, 2016
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
  • [in Japanese]
    Type: Workshop
    Session ID: CW2
    Published: 2015
    Released: February 02, 2016
    CONFERENCE PROCEEDINGS FREE ACCESS
Public Symposium
Oral Session
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