Circulation Journal
Online ISSN : 1347-4820
Print ISSN : 1346-9843
Epidemiology
Impact of Speed-Eating Habit on Subsequent Body Mass Index and Blood Pressure Among Schoolchildren ― The Ibaraki Children’s Cohort Study (IBACHIL) ―
Kazumasa YamagishiToshimi SairenchiNobuyuki SawadaKeiko SunouMizuki SataUtako MuraiNobue TakizawaFujiko IrieHiroshi WatanabeHiroyasu IsoHitoshi Ota
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2018 Volume 82 Issue 2 Pages 419-422

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Abstract

Background:Habitual speed eating is a risk factor of obesity but evidence of this in children is limited. We examined the association between speed-eating habit and subsequent body mass index (BMI) and blood pressure (BP) among Japanese children.

Methods and Results:The community-based study comprised 1,490 Japanese boys and girls who were born in 1989, involved in the Ibaraki Children’s Cohort Study at age 3 years, and had returned questionnaires at both ages 6 and 12 years. In a subsample, we measured BP (n=263). Speed-eating habit was categorized into 4 groups: Never, Quit, Newly, and Continuous. Sex-specific mean values of questionnaire-based BMI and measured BPs at age 12 were examined according to speed-eating habit. Children with continuous speed eating had a higher BMI at age 12 than those who had never had a speed-eating habit (20.0 vs. 17.9 kg/m2for boys (P<0.001); 20.0 vs. 18.4 kg/m2(P<0.001) for girls). Systolic BP at age 12 was higher in boys with continuous speed eating than in those without (117 vs. 110 mmHg, P=0.01), but such a difference was not observed in girls (112 vs. 111 mmHg, P=0.95).

Conclusions:Habitualspeed eating was positively associated with subsequent BMI among boys and girls as well as with systolic BP among boys.

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© 2018 THE JAPANESE CIRCULATION SOCIETY
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