International Journal of Erosion Control Engineering
Online ISSN : 1882-6547
ISSN-L : 1882-6547
Volume 5 , Issue 2
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
Original Article
  • Ram Krishna REGMI, Hajime NAKAGAWA, Kenji KAWAIKE, Yasuyuki BABA, Hao ...
    2012 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 113-122
    Published: 2012
    Released: December 27, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Numerical simulations and flume experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of slope failure due to rainfall events. A three-dimensional (3D) seepage flow numerical simulation model was coupled with a two-dimensional (2D) surface flow and erosion/deposition model for the seepage analysis.The conventional water-phase (one-phase) seepage-flow model assumed only water-phase flow in the seepage analysis, which was inadequate for unsaturated soil domains. A water-air two-phase seepage-flow model that considered both the water and air phases in the seepage-flow process was also used for the seepage analysis. The pore-water pressure and moisture-content data obtained from the seepage-flow model were used to analyze the slope stability. Janbu’s simplified method and the extended Spencer method were used for the stability analysis. The numerical simulation and experimental measurements agreed satisfactorily in terms of moisture and air movement, seepage outflow rate, surface water forefront propagation, predicted critical slip surfaces, and time of failure of the considered slope.
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  • Ram Krishna REGMI, Hajime NAKAGAWA, Kenji KAWAIKE, Yasuyuki BABA, Hao ...
    Type: Republication Notice
    2013 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 155
    Published: 2013
    Released: June 29, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Figures 1 and 2 in Vol.5, No.2, p.113-122 were not shown correctly, so they were replaced in Vol.5,No.2, p.156-165.
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  • Ram Krishna REGMI, Hajime NAKAGAWA, Kenji KAWAIKE, Yasuyuki BABA, Hao ...
    Type: Original Article
    2012 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 156-165
    Published: 2012
    Released: June 29, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Numerical simulations and flume experiments were performed to investigate the mechanism of slope failure due to rainfall events. A three-dimensional (3D) seepage flow numerical simulation model was coupled with a two-dimensional (2D) surface flow and erosion/deposition model for the seepage analysis. The conventional water-phase (one-phase) seepage-flow model assumed only water-phase flow in the seepage analysis, which was inadequate for unsaturated soil domains. A water-air two-phase seepage-flow model that considered both the water and air phases in the seepage-flow process was also used for the seepage analysis. The pore-water pressure and moisture-content data obtained from the seepage-flow model were used to analyze the slope stability. Janbu’s simplified method and the extended Spencer method were used for the stability analysis. The numerical simulation and experimental measurements agreed satisfactorily in terms of moisture and air movement, seepage outflow rate, surface water forefront propagation, predicted critical slip surfaces, and time of failure of the considered slope.
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Technical Note
  • Badri Bhakta SHRESTHA, Hajime NAKAGAWA, Kenji KAWAIKE, Hao ZHANG
    2012 Volume 5 Issue 2 Pages 123-133
    Published: 2012
    Released: December 27, 2012
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Glacial lake outbursts are a major hazard in the South Asian Himalaya and other glacier regions of the world. Climate change and glacier retreat have heightened the danger of outburst events, as new glacial lakes have formed and expanded. The outburst discharge from glacial lakes may cause catastrophic flooding and damage in downstream areas. It is thus important to investigate the impact of climate change on glacial lakes and to understand lake behavior. This study examined glacier- and sediment-related hazards in the Rolwaling Valley of Nepal, and field-assessed the Tsho Rolpa glacial lake in the valley. Potential causes of moraine dam failure at Tsho Rolpa include overflow and erosion of the dam caused by ice or boulders falling into the lake, seepage inside the dam, melting of the ice core inside the dam, or an earthquake. The peak outburst discharge from Tsho Rolpa was estimated to range from 7,759 to 90,296 m3/s using different empirical equations. The resulting flood would cause serious damage up to 100 km or more downstream, threatening many people, agricultural lands, forests, hydroelectric projects, and other infrastructure.
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