Journal of Applied Glycoscience
Online ISSN : 1880-7291
Print ISSN : 1344-7882
Advance online publication
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from Advance online publication
  • Taisuke Watanabe, Masashi Nasukawa, Yuki Yoshida, Takashi Kogo, Jun Og ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_0004
    Published: January 18, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: January 18, 2019
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    In the current study, we attempted to enhance the xylanase activity of Trichoderma reesei ATCC66589 by using disparity mutagenesis, wherein a plasmid harboring proofreading-impaired DNA polymerase δ was inserted. Following selection on xylan-rich media and successive plasmid curing, a mutant showing conidiospores strikingly different from those of the parent strain, with many small humped-surface spheres, was generated. Xylanase and β-xylosidase activities of the mutant XM1, cultivated in xylan medium, were 15.8- and 11.0-fold higher than those of the parent strain, respectively. Furthermore, xylanase activity was generated approximately 24 h in advance compared to that in the parent. In contrast, when cultivated in Avicel medium, its xylanase and β-xylosidase activities were 0.14- and 0.33-fold, respectively, compared to those in the parent. Among the xylan component sugars and related polyols, D-xylose and xylobiose exerted a distinct inductive effect on the xylanase activity in Avicel media, while xylitol and L-arabinose did not. Mutagenesis involved in xylose catabolism is suggestive of changes at the gene transcription level. Although the induction mechanism remains unclear in details, disparity mutagenesis may be useful for obtaining T. reesei mutants with high xylanase activity.

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  • Yuji Honda, Tetsuya Yamazaki, Naoya Katsumi, Naoko Fujita, Kenji Matsu ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_0010
    Published: January 10, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: January 10, 2019
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    We investigated the physicochemical properties of starches extracted from 8 lotus (Nelumbo nucifera Gaertn.) rhizomes harvested in different months (September 2012 to May 2013). The physicochemical properties of the lotus starches depended on the harvest date. The peak viscosity (PV) in the Rapid Visco-Analyser analysis, and the viscosity at 65 °C (V65) in the rotational viscometer analysis were significantly lower in SEP starch (extracted from the September-harvested sample) than in the other lotus starches. The Spearman's rank correlation coefficients of potassium ion (K) content vs. V65 and of K content vs. PV were 0.905 and 0.714, respectively, indicating that potassium ions are important for expressing the pasting properties of lotus starch. Principal component analysis suggested that the potassium, magnesium, calcium, and phosphorus contents are important for displaying both the pasting and gelatinization properties of the lotus starches. Meanwhile, the cluster analysis revealed that physicochemical properties of the SEP starch were different from those of the starches harvested in other months.

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  • Hideyuki Takahashi, Chiharu Yoshida, Takumi Takeda
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_0007
    Published: December 07, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: December 07, 2018
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    Sugars are one of the most important factors determining the taste and texture of asparagus (Asparagus officinalis). In this study, we quantified soluble and insoluble sugars in asparagus spears grown in four different agricultural fields. We measured soil chemical properties in each of the fields, and further investigated the relationship between sugar contents in the spears and soil chemical properties. We found a possible relationship between the contents of glucose and fructose and values of cation exchange capacity, available phosphoric acid, and exchangeable calcium and magnesium in the soil. These findings will be useful information for improving asparagus quality.

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  • Naoko Crofts, Ayaka Itoh, Misato Abe, Satoko Miura, Naoko F. Oitome, J ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_005
    Published: December 07, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: December 07, 2018
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    Extra-long chains (ELC) of amylopectin in rice endosperm are synthesized by granule-bound starch synthase I encoded by the Waxy (Wx) gene, which primarily synthesizes amylose. Previous studies showed that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP) in intron 1 and exon 6 of the Wx gene influences ELC amount. However, whether these SNPs are conserved among rice cultivars and if any other SNPs are present in the Wx gene remained unknown. Here, we sequenced the Wx gene from 17 rice cultivars with S or L-type amylopectin, including those with known ELC content and those originating in China with unique starch properties, as well as typical japonica and indica cultivars. In addition to the two SNPs described above, an additional SNP correlating with ELC content was found in exon 10. Low ELC cultivars (<3.0 %) had thymine at the splicing donor site of intron 1, Tyr224 in exon 6, and Pro415 in exon 10. Cultivars with moderate ELC content (4.1–6.9 %) had guanine at the splicing donor site of intron 1, Ser224 in exon 6, and Pro415 in exon 10. Cultivars with high ELC content (7.7–13.9 %) had guanine at the splicing donor site of intron 1, Tyr224 in exon 6, and Ser415 in exon 10. The chain length distribution pattern of amylopectin was correlated with the amounts of SSIIa found in starch granules and gelatinization temperature, but not with ELC content. The combinations of SNPs in the Wx gene found in this study may provide useful information for screening specific cultivars with different ELC content.

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  • Kazuhiro Chiku, Mami Wada, Haruka Atsuji, Arisa Hosonuma, Mitsuru Yos ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_0002
    Published: November 05, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 05, 2018
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    We evaluated the stabilities of kojibiose and sophorose when heated under neutral pH conditions. Kojibiose and sophorose epimerized at the C-2 position of glucose on the reducing end, resulting in the production of 2-O-α-D-glucopyranosyl-D-mannose and 2-O-β-D-glucopyranosyl-D-mannose, respectively. Under weak alkaline conditions, kojibiose was decomposed due to heating into its mono-dehydrated derivatives, including 3-deoxy-2,3-unsaturated compounds and bicyclic 3,6-anhydro compounds. Following these experiments, we propose a kinetic model for the epimerization and decomposition of kojibiose and sophorose by heat treatment under neutral pH and alkaline conditions. The proposed model shows a good fit with the experimental data collected in this study. The rate constants of a reversible epimerization of kojibiose at pH 7.5 and 90 °C were (1.6 ± 0.1) × 10−5 s−1 and (3.2 ± 0.2) × 10−5 s−1 for the forward and reverse reactions, respectively, and were almost identical to those [(1.5 ± 0.1) × 10−5 s−1 and (3.5 ± 0.4) × 10−5 s−1] of sophorose. The rate constant of the decomposition reaction for kojibiose was (4.7 ± 1.1) × 10−7 s−1 whereas that for sophorose [(3.7 ± 0.2) × 10−6 s−1] was about ten times higher. The epimerization reaction was not significantly affected by the variation in the buffer except for a borate buffer, and depended instead upon the pH value (concentration of hydroxide ions), indicating that epimerization occurred as a function of the hydroxide ion. These instabilities are an extension of the neutral pH conditions for keto-enol tautomerization that are often observed under strong alkaline conditions.

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  • Kenji Yamagishi, Masakazu Ike, Di Guan, Ken Tokuyasu
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_0003
    Published: November 05, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 05, 2018
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    Generally, Ca(OH)2 pretreatment of lignocellulosics for fermentable sugar recovery requires a subsequent washing step for calcium removal and pH control for optimized saccharification. However, washing Ca(OH)2-pretreated feedstock with water is considered problematic because of the low solubility of Ca(OH)2 and its adsorption to biomass. In this study, we estimated the availability of carbonated water for calcium removal from the slurry of Ca(OH)2-pretreated rice straw (RS). We tested two kinds of countercurrent washing sequences, four washings exclusively with water (W4) and two washings with water and subsequent two washings with carbonated water (W2C2). The ratios of calcium removal from pretreatment slurry after washing were 64.2 % for the W4 process and 92.1 % for the W2C2 process. In the W2C2 process, 49 % of the initially added calcium was recovered as CaO by calcination. In enzymatic saccharification tests under a CO2 atmosphere at 1.5 atm, in terms of recovery of both glucose and xylose, pretreated, feedstock washed through the W2C2 process surpassed that washed through the W4 process, which could be attributed to the pH difference during saccharification: 5.6 in the W2C2 process versus 6.3 in the W4 process. Additionally, under an unpressurized CO2 atmosphere at 1 atm, the feedstock washed through the W2C2 process released 78.5 % of total glucose residues and 90.0 % of total xylose residues. Thus, efficient removal of calcium from pretreatment slurry would lead to not only the recovery of added calcium but also the proposal of a new, simple saccharification system to be used under an unpressurized CO2 atmosphere condition.

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  • Di Guan, Rui Zhao, Yuan Li, Yoshikiyo Sakakibara, Masakazu Ike, Ken T ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_0006
    Published: November 05, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 05, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Novel bioreactor beads for simultaneous saccharification and fermentation (SSF) of lime-pretreated rice straw (RS) into ethanol were prepared. Genetically modified Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing genes encoding xylose reductase, xylitol dehydrogenase, and xylulokinase were immobilized in calcium alginate beads containing inorganic lightweight filler particles to reduce specific gravity. For SSF experiments, the beads were floated in slurry composed of lime-pretreated RS and enzymes and incubated under CO2 atmosphere to reduce the pH for saccharification and fermentation. Following this reaction, beads were readily picked up from the upper part of the slurry and were directly transferred to the next vessel with slurry. After 240 h of incubation, ethanol production by the beads was equivalent to that by free cells, a trend that was repeated in nine additional runs, with slightly improved ethanol yields. Slurry with pre-saccharified lime-pretreated RS was subjected to SSF with floating beads for 168 h. Although higher cell concentrations in beads resulted in more rapid initial ethanol production rates, with negligible diauxic behavior for glucose and xylose utilization, no improvement in the ethanol yield was observed. A fermentor-scale SSF experiment with floating beads was successfully performed twice, with repeated use of the beads, resulting in the production of 40.0 and 39.7 g/L ethanol. There was no decomposition of the beads during agitation at 60 rpm. Thus, this bioreactor enables reuse of yeast cells for efficient ethanol production by SSF of lignocellulosic feedstock, without the need for instruments for centrifugation or filtration of whole slurry.

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  • Haruka Yagi, Ryo Takehara, Aika Tamaki, Koji Teramoto, Sosyu Tsutsui, ...
    Article ID: jag.JAG-2018_0008
    Published: November 05, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 05, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    We functionally characterized the GH10 xylanase (SoXyn10A) and the GH11 xylanase (SoXyn11B) derived from the actinomycete Streptomyces olivaceoviridis E-86. Each enzyme exhibited differences in the produced reducing power upon degradation of xylan substrates. SoXyn10A produced higher reducing power than SoXyn11B. Gel filtration of the hydrolysates generated by both enzymes revealed that the original substrate was completely decomposed. Enzyme mixtures of SoXyn10A and SoXyn11B produced the same level of reducing power as SoXyn10A alone. These observations were in good agreement with the composition of the hydrolysis products. The hydrolysis products derived from the incubation of soluble birchwood xylan with a mixture of SoXyn10A and SoXyn11B produced the same products as SoXyn10A alone with similar compositions. Furthermore, the addition of SoXyn10A following SoXyn11B-mediated digestion of xylan produced the same products as SoXyn10A alone with similar compositions. Thus, it was hypothesized that SoXyn10A could degrade xylans to a smaller size than SoXyn11B. In contrast to the soluble xylans as the substrate, the produced reducing power generated by both enzymes was not significantly different when pretreated milled bagasses were used as substrates. Quantification of the pentose content in the milled bagasse residues after the enzyme digestions revealed that SoXyn11B hydrolyzed xylans in pretreated milled bagasses much more efficiently than SoXyn10A. These data suggested that the GH10 xylanases can degrade soluble xylans smaller than the GH11 xylanases. However, the GH11 xylanases may be more efficient at catalyzing xylan degradation in natural environments (e.g. biomass) where xylans interact with celluloses and lignins.

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