Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences
Online ISSN : 1349-3825
Print ISSN : 1345-6296
Volume 111 , Issue 1
February
Showing 1-5 articles out of 5 articles from the selected issue
EDITORIAL BOARD
  • 2016 Volume 111 Issue 1 Pages 111H2
    Published: 2016
    Released: March 07, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Official journal of Japan Association of Mineralogical Sciences (JAMS), focusing on mineralogical and petrological sciences and their related fields. Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is the successor journal to both "Journal of Mineralogy, Petrology and Economic Geology" and "Mineralogical Journal". Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences (JMPS) is indexed in the ISI database (Thomson Reuters), the Science Citation Index-Expanded, Current Contents/Physical, Chemical & Earth Sciences, and ISI Alerting Services.
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ORIGINAL ARTICLES
  • Kazumasa SUGIYAMA, Hiroshi ARIMA, Hayato KONNO, Toru KAWAMATA
    2016 Volume 111 Issue 1 Pages 1-8
    Published: 2016
    Released: March 07, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The local structure of Mn in a pink elbaitic tourmaline from Mogok, Myanmar, was studied using the Mn K–edge X–ray absorption fine structure (XAFS) technique. The observed edge energy of Mn was rather near that of Mn2+, and the corresponding nearest neighbor Mn–O distance of 2.09 Å supported the overall preference of Mn2+. Simulation of the XAFS spectra implied the distribution of Mn at the distorted octahedral site (Y–site). The present paper also provides detailed structural features obtained by single crystal X–ray diffraction.
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  • Takashi YUGUCHI, Hideki IWANO, Takenori KATO, Shuhei SAKATA, Kentaro H ...
    2016 Volume 111 Issue 1 Pages 9-34
    Published: 2016
    Released: March 07, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: February 10, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Zircons collected from a granitic pluton provide evidence of serial growth events with specific mechanisms, crystallization temperatures and U–Pb ages, revealing details of the sequential formation process from intrusion through emplacement to crystallization/solidification. The events have been identified by: 1) the study of the internal structure of zircon using cathodoluminescence, 2) deriving crystallization temperatures using Ti–in–zircon thermometry of the internal structure and 3) U–Pb age dating of the internal structure. The magmatic zircons from the Toki granite, central Japan, show two kinds in their internal structure: a low luminescence core (LLC) and oscillatory zonation (OZ). The LLC was produced by interfacial reaction–controlled growth in the granitic magma with cooling from about 910 to 760 °C. The formation of OZ occurred by diffusion–controlled growth in a cooling magma chamber from about 850 to 690 °C. The U–Pb ages derived from the LLC ranges from 74.7 ± 4.2 to 70.5 ± 1.3 Ma, indicating the incipient intrusion timing of the magma into the shallow crust. The OZ ages distribute from 72.7 ± 0.6 to 70.4 ± 1.7 Ma, which mean the timing from emplacement to crystallization/solidification of the granite pluton. Thus, the serial processes from intrusion through emplacement to crystallization/solidification occurred within a few million years. The old LLC and OZ ages are recognized in the western margins of the Toki granite, implying that the magma forming the western margins was the first to intrude, emplace and crystallize/solidify. The western margins with initial intrusion may accompany the crustal assimilation in order to create sufficient magma reservoir space, which is consistent with larger SrI and ASI values found in the western margins of the granite.
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  • Satoshi JINNOUCHI, Akira YOSHIASA, Kazumasa SUGIYAMA, Reiko SHIMURA, H ...
    2016 Volume 111 Issue 1 Pages 35-43
    Published: 2016
    Released: March 07, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Crystal structures of legrandite [Zn2AsO4(OH)·H2O; a = 12.8014(11), b = 7.9390(3), c = 10.2262(5) Å, β = 104.490(2)°; space group P21/c; Z = 8], adamite [Zn2AsO4(OH); a = 8.3428(11), b = 8.5664(10), c = 6.0769(8) Å; space group Pnnm; Z = 4], and paradamite [Zn2AsO4(OH); a = 5.8438(5), b = 6.7226(6), c = 5.6566(4) Å, α = 104.348(3), β = 92.320(3), γ = 76.683(3)°; space group P1; Z = 2] were investigated by single–crystal X–ray diffraction and were refined to the R1 values of 0.0212, 0.0282, and 0.0270 using 2800, 588, and 1128 unique reflections with Fo >4σ(Fo), respectively. The chemical formula of legrandite is similar to that of adamite and paradamite, except for the presence of water molecules. In the structure of legrandite, the hydrogen atoms are distributed among the two hydroxyl and the two water molecule positions. On the basis of bond valence calculations, the hydrogen bonding in legrandite can be classified into three types: (1) one acceptor with linear normal hydrogen bonding (Type–A), (2) two acceptors with linear hydrogen bonding and one excess weak hydrogen bonding (Type–B), and (3) several acceptors with one linear hydrogen bondings and several weak hydrogen bondings by weak electrostatic interactions (Type–C). The variety of hydrogen bonding interactions provides structural stability to legrandite. The Zn3–O1 bond shows a remarkable distance of 2.341(2) Å, which is ascribed to the three–dimensional periodicity of the complex mineral structure. The local structures of adamite and paradamite violate a fundamental crystallographic law with respect to the cation coordination number and unit cell volume. The crystal structures of legrandite and paradamite are characterized by proton transfer tunnels running along the crystal axes.
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INSTRUCTIONS FOR CONTRIBUTORS
  • 2016 Volume 111 Issue 1 Pages 44-45
    Published: 2016
    Released: March 07, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Manuscripts to be considered for publication in the Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences should be original, high-quality scientific manuscripts concerned with mineralogical and petrological sciences and related fields. Submitted papers must not have been published previously in any language, and author(s) must agree not to submit papers under review in the Journal of Mineralogical and Petrological Sciences to other journals. The editorial board reserves the right to reject any manuscript that is not of high quality and that does not comply with the journal format outlined below. The editorial board is keen to encourage the submission of articles from a wide range of researchers. Information on submitting manuscripts is also available from the journal web site (http://jams.la.coocan.jp/jmps.htm).
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