Journal of Music Perception and Cognition
Online ISSN : 2434-737X
Print ISSN : 1342-856X
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Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from the selected issue
  • Yuzuki KITAMURA, Yosuke KITA, Yasuko OKUMURA, Masumi INAGAKI, Hideyuki ...
    2019 Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 3-12
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 06, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Pitch discrimination is the ability to distinguish differences in pitch and it is important for playing musical instruments and listening to music. However, owing to the limited verbal abilities of young children, not much is known about developmental changes in pitch discrimination during childhood. Therefore, the present study examined pitch discrimination abilities in preschool and early elementary school children using non-verbal responses. It was found that an ability to recognize the same pitch improved among preschoolers (4-5 years) and kindergarteners (5-6 years), while high-low pitch discrimination improved between first- and second-graders. In addition, musical experience improved pitch discrimination performance, but only among second-graders. These results suggest that the development of pitch discrimination during childhood involves both gradual natural acquisition and continuous musical experiences.
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  • Yuriko TAKADA, Chiaki ISHIGURO, Takeshi OKADA
    2019 Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 21-28
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 06, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Music performers often reflect on whether they can follow the composer.s images through the music score, realize their own images, and convey such images to listeners. These notions can be called expressive awareness in music performance. The purpose of this study is to develop psychological scales for expressive awareness in music performance for music performance learners such as music students. An expert in music education along with two psychologists conducted a questionnaire survey with 180 undergraduates (M=20.04, SD= 2.17) who majored in music. Factor analysis indicated a three-factor structure of expressive awareness in music performance: .Conveying the messages to the audience,. .Matching the performer.s intention and method for expression,. and .Following the music score.. Each factor of expressive awareness demonstrated sufficient reliability (Cronbach.s α>.70). This scale is thought to be useful to understand how music performers practice and learn to perform better.
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  • Keiji HIRATA, Satoshi TOJO
    2019 Volume 25 Issue 1 Pages 29-39
    Published: 2019
    Released: June 06, 2020
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Download PDF (1581K)
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