Journal of the Yamashina Institute for Ornithology
Online ISSN : 1882-0999
Print ISSN : 1348-5032
ISSN-L : 1348-5032
Volume 48 , Issue 1
Showing 1-7 articles out of 7 articles from the selected issue
Short Note
  • Tadashi Suzuki
    2016 Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 1-11
    Published: September 30, 2016
    Released: December 12, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Fruit consumers of the poisonous shrub Daphne pseudomezereum (Thymelaeaceae) growing on the forest floor were investigated using automatic cameras on the southern foothill of the Tanzawa Mountains in Hadano, Kanagawa Prefecture, Japan. A total of five species of birds and four species of mammals were photographed near and/or on the fruiting trees of D. pseudomezereum. Camera trapping revealed that among them the Brown-eared Bulbul Hypsipetes amaurotis and the Oriental Greenfinch Chloris sinica were consumers of the fruits; no other species were recorded foraging the fruits. The Brown-eared Bulbul, which is well-known as a legitimate fruit-eater (i.e. frugivorous bird dispersing seeds) in woody areas in Japan, foraged upon the red ripe but not the green unripe fleshy fruits. However, the Oriental Greenfinch was recorded foraging heavily on the seeds of both green unripe and red ripe fruits, while discarding the flesh. Not only adults but also young fed upon the seeds of D. pseudomezereum. Furthermore, one male adult was observed to feed seeds to a fledgling at the foraging site. Thus, the Oriental Greenfinch was the major seed predator of D. pseudomezereum on the forest floor in the study area, although in Japan it is generally known as a granivorous bird foraging in such open habitats as cultivated land, riparian grassland and shrubland.

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Reports
  • Ryuta Yoshihara, Yoshihito Goto, Kenji Kitaura, Taku Mizuta
    2016 Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 12-15
    Published: September 30, 2016
    Released: December 12, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    A Fairy Pitta Pitta nympha was recorded by a camera trap on Amami-Oshima Island, Kagoshima Prefecture, southwestern Japan. Two images were obtained at 18:35:50 and 18:36:02 on May 18, 2015, respectively. This is the first record of the Fairy Pitta on Amami-Oshima Island.

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  • Ken-ichi Setsuda
    2016 Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 16-28
    Published: September 30, 2016
    Released: December 12, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Yoji Yanagihara (1892–1961) was a bird collector in Gifu, Japan. Yanagihara owned bird specimens which Tokutaro Momiyama (1895–1962) collected in Hachijojima. Momiyama stayed in Hachijojima from 1922 through 1925 and collected 2,049 bird specimens with his cooperator on the island until 1934. Of these, Momiyama exchanged 100 specimens with other collectors. In this study, I enumerated 16 bird specimens in the Momoyama collection housed at Yamashina Institute of Ornithology, which I consider that Momiyama obtained through exchange with Yanagihara.

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  • Noritomo Kawaji, Toshio Hayashi, Toshiya Matsuura
    2016 Volume 48 Issue 1 Pages 29-35
    Published: September 30, 2016
    Released: December 12, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The Copper Pheasant Syrmaticus soemmerringii is endemic to Japan, but nothing is known of its home range. We captured a male Copper Pheasant from the Tama Forest Science Garden in a suburb in Tokyo, Japan, and radio-tracked the bird from June 2003 to May 2004. Vegetation in the study area comprised a cherry arboretum, a mature cedar and cypress plantation, secondary evergreen broadleaved forest, mixed forest with many broadleaved trees invading the coniferous plantation area, and an arboretum planted with various tree species for exhibition. The home range, which was calculated using the minimum convex polygon method based on 138–345 points seasonally, was smaller during summer and autumn (5.76 and 5.30 ha, respectively) than that during winter and spring (12.41 and 8.76 ha, respectively). The vegetation composition within the home range was significantly different from that of tracked points throughout the year. The bird spent significantly more time in the mixed forest area within its home range throughout the year, and also exhibited a significant preference for the secondary broadleaved forest area throughout the year, except during autumn. However, the proportion tracked points within the cherry arboretum was significantly less than that within the entire home range throughout the year. The tracked male moved around with one female from September 2003 to March 2004, except during February. Two females and the tracked male moved together throughout the day during February 2004.

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