Physical Therapy Research
Online ISSN : 2189-8448
Advance online publication
Advance online publication

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Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from Advance online publication
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  • Toru KOKUBO, Akihiko TAJIMA, Akiyoshi MIYAZAWA, Yasuyuki MARUYAMA
    Article ID: E9929
    [Advance publication] Released: April 20, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to evaluate the oxygen uptake in patients with cardiovascular disease during the low-impact dance program and to compare the findings with the values at peak oxygen uptake (VO2) and aerobic threshold (AT). Methods: The study included 19 patients with cardiovascular disease [age, 68.3±8.7 years; left-ventricular ejection fraction, 60.3%±8.7%; peak VO2, 6.6±1.1 metabolic equivalents (METs)] who were receiving optimal medical treatment. Their heart rate and VO2 were monitored during cardiopulmonary exercise testing (CPET) and during the low impact dance. The dance involved low-impact dynamic sequences. The patients completed two patterns of low-impact dance, and metabolic gas exchange measurements were obtained using a portable ergospirometry carried in a backpack during the dance sessions. Results: The mean values of VO2 (4.0±0.2 METs and 3.9±0.3 METs) and those of heart rate (105.2±2.9 bpm and 96.8±2.6 bpm) during the dance program were not significantly differ from the AT value (4.5±0.2 METs) obtained in CPET. The median (and interquartile range) RPE reported after the dance exercise trials was 11 (9-13). No signs of overexertion were observed in any of the patients during either dance exercise trial. Conclusions: The results suggest that it is reasonable to consider the low-impact dance program as an aerobic exercise program in cardiac rehabilitation. Our findings have important implications for exercise training programs in the cardiac rehabilitation setting and for future studies.

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  • Ferran CUENCA-MARTÍNEZ, Sara CORTÉS-AMADOR, Gemma Victoria ESPÍ-LÓPEZ
    Article ID: E9937
    [Advance publication] Released: March 20, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Introduction: Chronic low back pain is a pathological process that compromises the functionality and quality of life worldwide. The objective of the study was to evaluate the effectiveness of classical physiotherapy in the management of non-specific chronic low back pain. Methods: A literature search in English electronic databases was performed from November to December of 2015. Only those studies addressing chronic non-specific low back pain by manual therapy and different types of exercises methods were included, and those, which combined acute or subacute pain with systematic reviews and clinical practice guidelines, were excluded. Studies involving cognitive-behavioral approaches were also excluded. Results: 487 studies were identified, 16 were analyzed and 10 were excluded. Of the 6 studies reviewed, 5 of them achieved a moderate quality and 1 of them was of a low quality. Back School exercises and McKenzie's method were all ineffective. Osteopathic spinal manipulation proved effective when performed on the lower back and the thoracic area but only immediately after it was received, and not in the medium or long term. Massages proved effective in the short term too, as well as the global postural reeducation although ultimately this study can be considered of a low methodological quality. Conclusions: Based on the data obtained, classical physiotherapy proposals show ineffectiveness in the treatment of chronic non-specific low back pain. More multidimensional studies are needed in order to achieve a better treatment of this condition, including the biopsychosocial paradigm.

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  • Misaki UEYAMA, Daisuke TAKAMURA, Rina NAKAJIMA, Jumpei HARADA, Kentaro ...
    Article ID: E9931
    [Advance publication] Released: February 23, 2018
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS ADVANCE PUBLICATION

    Purpose: Cryotherapy has been employed to reduce postoperative inflammation for enhancement of the recovery of total knee arthroplasty (TKA). However, the clinical advantages in functional recovery after TKA remain controversial. This study was conducted to clarify the postoperative alterations in deep temperature around the knee and to evaluate the association between the temperature changes and functional recovery in the early phase after TKA. Methods: Postoperative changes in deep temperature around the knee were evaluated with the probe that can measure subcutaneous tissue temperature at the depth of 1 cm in 28 patients with medial knee osteoarthritis undergoing unilateral TKA through medial parapatellar approach. The same rehabilitation protocol was provided without cryotherapy. Outcome assessment included knee range of motion (ROM) and 10-meter fast speed walking test. Results: The operated knee showed a greater increase in deep temperature at postoperative days 1 and 2, followed by a gradual decrease by day 14 when the temperature was still higher than the baseline. When deep temperature change around the operated knee was calculated by subtracting the preoperative temperature from the highest postoperative one, significant association was found between deep temperature change and knee ROM recovery at day 14. The operated knees with more than 2°C increase in postoperative deep temperature resulted in poor ROM recovery. There was no association of deep temperature change with 10-meter fast speed walking test improvement at day 14 or ROM recovery at 1-year follow-up. Conclusions: This study has provided the first data on deep temperature alterations around the knee after TKA. More than 2°C increase in postoperative deep temperature could result in poor ROM recovery after TKA. The results may support establishment of adequate procedures of cryotherapy for early gain in knee motion after TKA.

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