Transactions of the Atomic Energy Society of Japan
Online ISSN : 2186-2931
Print ISSN : 1347-2879
ISSN-L : 1347-2879
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Article
  • Ayako SUDO, Fumiki MIZUSAKO, Kuniyoshi HOSHINO, Takumi SATO, Yuji NAGA ...
    2019 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 111-118
    Published: 2019
    Released: August 15, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: June 20, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     The cooling rate of molten core materials during solidification significantly affects the segregation of major constituents of fuel debris. To understand the general tendency of the segregation, liquefaction/solidification tests of simulated corium (UO2, ZrO2, FeO, B4C and sim-FP oxides) were performed. The simulated corium was heated up to 2,600℃ in Ar atmosphere and then cooled with two different cooling processes: furnace cooling (average cooling rate of approximately 744℃/min) and slow cooling (cooling from 2,600℃ to 2,300℃ at a rate of 5℃/min and from 2,300℃ to 1,120℃ at approximately 788℃/min). Element analysis detected three oxide phases with different compositions and one metal phase in both solidified samples. The solubility of FeO in these oxide phases was mostly fixed at 12±5 at% in both samples, which is in reasonable accordance with the value estimated from UO2–ZrO2–FeO phase diagrams. However, the significant grain growth of one oxide phase, rich in Zr-oxide, was detected only in the slowly cooled sample. The composition of this particular oxide phase is similar to the initial average composition. The grain growth is considered to be caused by the connection of remaining liquid agglomerates during slow solidification.

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  • Takayuki AOKI
    2019 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 119-134
    Published: 2019
    Released: August 15, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: June 20, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     In normal nuclear power plants, three fundamental safety functions, i.e., stopping the reactor, cooling the reactor and confining radioactive materials, must be maintained to ensure nuclear safety. Similarly, during the decommissioning of accident-damaged nuclear power plants, they must be maintained. However, in severely accident-damaged nuclear power plants, such as Fukushima Daiichi Units 1 to 3, the stopping function is lost and the confinement function is degraded. In such cases, it can be considered that the cooling function during the decommissioning period before starting fuel debris retrieval becomes more important for nuclear safety than in the other periods. This is because it plays a very important role in maintaining the physical state of the fuel and fuel debris to prevent recriticality and thus suppresses the mobility of radioactive materials. Similarly, the confinement function becomes more important during the fuel debris retrieval. Because of the high radiation level, it is very difficult to access the inside of the primary containment vessel and reactor building to investigate and/or repair equipment or components. Thus, it may be necessary to propose a decontamination and decommissioning project with remaining unknowns and to perform extensive research and development to complete the project. Such a project must be carried out strategically with the efficient and effective use of risk information. In this paper, the results of considering the basic concept and methods of risk management during the decommissioning of accident-damaged nuclear power plants from the viewpoint of safety and economic risks are reported.

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  • Shinobu YOSHIMURA, Tomoshi MIYAMURA, Tomonori YAMADA, Hiroshi AKIBA, H ...
    2019 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 135-159
    Published: 2019
    Released: August 15, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: July 25, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     This research presents the recent development of the analysis system ADVENTURE, i.e., a parallel structural analysis solver ADVENTURE_Solid Ver.2 and its pre-/post-modules, towards petascale computers such as the K computer with 10 petaflops peak performance, as well as its application to three-dimensional finite element seismic response analyses of a full-scale integrated model of the boiling water reactor and reactor building of Unit 1 at the Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant subjected to the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake of 9.0 Mw occurring on March 11, 2011. Here, we precisely modeled its pressure vessel, containment vessel, suppression chamber, vent piping, a number of supports and the reactor building with a 200 million DOF finite element mesh. Then, we successfully solved its dynamic response in 65 s. We report our research results in two papers, i.e., Part I and Part II. Part I (this paper) reports the developed analysis method, model construction, verification of the analysis model, and computation performance. Part II reports the results of an eigenanalysis and a seismic response analysis. Finally, we concluded some key roles of petascale simulation for such practical and socially important problems.

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  • Shinobu YOSHIMURA, Tomoshi MIYAMURA, Tomonori YAMADA, Hiroshi AKIBA, H ...
    2019 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 160-190
    Published: 2019
    Released: August 15, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: July 25, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     This paper presents Part II of the report of our research on three-dimensional finite element seismic response analyses of a full-scale integrated model of the boiling water reactor and reactor building of Unit 1 at Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Plant subjected to the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake of 9.0 Mw occurring on March 11, 2011. The previous paper (Part I) reported the developed analysis method, i.e., the parallel structural analysis solver ADVENTURE_Solid Ver.2 and its pre-/post-modules towards the K computer, model construction, the verification of the analysis model, and computation performance. Part II (this paper) reports the results of the eigenanalysis and seismic response analysis of the developed three-dimensional finite element model. These results were precisely compared with those of a lumped mass model. The overall responses of the two different models agreed reasonably well, although the three-dimensional finite element model succeeded in showing local responses more precisely. Finally, we concluded some key roles of petascale simulation for such practical and socially important problems.

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Technical Material
  • Yohei SATO, Tomoya IWASHIMA, Tetsuo MOTOHASHI, Masamichi OBATA
    2019 Volume 18 Issue 3 Pages 191-197
    Published: 2019
    Released: August 15, 2019
    [Advance publication] Released: June 20, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

     International Research Institute for Nuclear Decommissioning is engaged in a METI-funded project with the title ‘Research and Development of Processing and Disposal of Solid Waste’. This R&D project, which aims to build a waste stream for Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, is executed by many organizations. The waste stream should be implemented by organizing several steps from generation to storage/disposal, and mutual feedback between each step is important to obtain the desired result. Tools to visualize and share the relations between each R&D theme of this project have been developed to enable the mutual communication of project members who are executing the R&D of different steps.

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