Biological and Pharmaceutical Bulletin
Online ISSN : 1347-5215
Print ISSN : 0918-6158
ISSN-L : 0918-6158
Regular Articles
Altered Functional Connectivity of the Orbital Cortex and Striatum Associated with Catalepsy Induced by Dopamine D1 and D2 Antagonists
Misaki NiuAtsushi Kasai Kaoru SeirikiMisuzu HayashidaMasato TanumaRei YokoyamaYumi HiratoHitoshi Hashimoto
Author information
JOURNAL FREE ACCESS FULL-TEXT HTML

2021 Volume 44 Issue 3 Pages 442-447

Details
Abstract

The dopamine system plays an important role in regulating many brain functions, including the motor function. The blockade of dopamine receptors results in a serious motor dysfunction, such as catalepsy and Parkinsonism. However, the neuronal mechanism underlying the drug-induced motor dysfunction is not well understood. Here, we examine brain-wide activation patterns in Fos-enhanced green fluorescent protein reporter mice that exhibit cataleptic behavior induced by SCH39166, a dopamine D1-like receptor antagonist, and raclopride, a dopamine D2-like receptor antagonist. Support vector classifications showed that the orbital cortex (ORB) and striatum including the caudoputamen (CP) and nucleus accumbens (ACB), prominently contribute to the discrimination between brains of the vehicle-treated and both SCH39166- and raclopride-treated mice. Interregional correlations indicated that the increased functional connectivity of functional networks, including the ORB, CP, and ACB, is the common mechanism underlying SCH39166- and raclopride-induced cataleptic behavior. Moreover, the distinct mechanisms in the SCH39166- and raclopride-induced cataleptic behaviors are the decreased functional connectivity between three areas above and the cortical amygdala, and between three areas above and the anterior cingulate cortex, respectively. Thus, the alterations of functional connectivity in diverse brain regions, including the ORB, provide new insights on the mechanism underlying drug-induced movement disorders.

Graphical Abstract Fullsize Image
Related papers from these authors
© 2021 The Pharmaceutical Society of Japan
Previous article Next article
feedback
Top