Engineering in Agriculture, Environment and Food
Online ISSN : 1881-8366
ISSN-L : 1881-8366
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Research article
  • Naruesorn JAISUE, Sutthiwal SETHA, Daisuke HAMANAKA, Matchima NARADISO ...
    2020 Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 98-104
    Published: 2020
    Released: October 16, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of electric field on physicochemical properties and antioxidant activity of persimmon (Diospyros kaki L.). Persimmons were exposed to electric field strength of 7 kV / cm for 3, 6 or 9 d during 15 d of storage at 10 °C. Persimmons without electric field treatment was considered as a control. The results showed that fruits received electric field for 9 d remained firmer, contained higher total phenolic content and had higher antioxidant activity than the untreated control after storage for 15 d. This suggests that exposure to electric field during storage may be useful for prolonging the shelf life of persimmon; and for producing and preserving persimmon product with high total phenolic content and antioxidant capacity.
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  • Yoshinari MORIO, Makoto MIWA, Katsusuke MURAKAMI
    2020 Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 105-120
    Published: 2020
    Released: October 16, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    In this study, we developed an autonomous color marker search system that uses a single pan-tilt-zoom camera to detect the 3D locations of multiple markers placed in a field. The system was designed to scan for multiple markers over a sensing range within 40 m in a field divided into 855 marker search grids. In the experiments, our system was able to robustly measure marker 3D positions within a sensing range of approximately 30 m, and with a root mean square error of less than 0.5 m, without large height differences between markers and camera, and without marker deformation, with the maximum marker search time required to scan the entire field of approximately 7 min.
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  • Arthur J. PHILIP, Negah NIKANJAM, Emilia NOWAK, Anthony N. MUTUKUMIRA
    2020 Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 121-128
    Published: 2020
    Released: October 16, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    In New Zealand, aerobic mesophilic counts on fresh chicken should be < 6 log CFU cm−2 by end of shelf-life (4 °C) as the products are susceptible to microbial contamination by spoilage and pathogenic microorganisms. Effect of UV-C light was investigated on fresh chicken samples (20 °C) using 50 to 300 mJ cm−2 dosages. Treatment with 50 mJ cm−2 extended the shelf-life of skin-on-fillets to day 6 and skinless-fillets to day 7 at 4 °C. This dosage had no impact on the colour and lipid oxidation of the chicken samples (p < 0.05), despite the detection of a slight burnt odour on treated fresh raw chicken samples stored for 1 d (4 °C) which was not perceived after cooking. Treatment with 50 mJ cm−2 successfully extended the shelf life of skinless chicken portions at 4 °C (p < 0.05).
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  • — Effects of Processing Conditions on Properties of Unripe Banana (Musa Cavendish) Pulp and Peel Flours —
    Nasuha BUNYAMEEN, Asia PERIN, Natthawuddhi DONLAO
    2020 Volume 13 Issue 4 Pages 129-138
    Published: 2020
    Released: October 16, 2021
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    This study investigated the effects of citric acid (CA) pretreatments and drying temperatures on quality of banana pulp and peel flours. Banana pulps and peels were pretreated with CA solution at different concentrations (0.5, 0.7, and 1.0 % w / v) and dried at 40, 60, and 80 °C. In banana pulp flour, higher CA concentration and drying temperature resulted in a lower level of water holding capacity. Resistant starch increased with increasing drying temperature. In banana peel flours, total polyphenol content increased with increasing drying temperature. Pretreating with 1.0 % CA solution and drying at 80 °C can produce good properties of the pulp flour. However, good properties of the peel flour can be achieved by pretreating with 1.0 % CA solution and drying at 60 °C.
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