Food Safety
Online ISSN : 2187-8404
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Original Article
  • Hoang A. Hoang, Nguyen T.T. Nhung
    Type: Original Article
    2018 Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 143-150
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 21, 2018
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    In this study, a method using a recombinant phage for detection of E. coli O157:H7 in fresh vegetables was investigated. Four kinds of fresh vegetables, i.e. lettuce (Lactuca sativa), mustard greens (Brassica juncea), coriander (Coriandrum sativum), and soybean sprouts were selected since they are commonly used in meals in Vietnam. Firstly, a phage-based method was investigated for detection of E. coli O157:H7 in the four types of vegetables. To support the detection by suppressing growth of background bacteria in vegetables, selective antibiotics, i.e. novobiocin (N) and vancomycin (V) in combination with BHI medium were examined. Secondly, quality of the method was evaluated in terms of sensitivity, specificity, and rapidity. The method enabled the detection of E. coli O157:H7 inoculated at 103, 102, or 101 CFU/ 10 mL of sterile 0.8% NaCl containing 5 g of vegetable and in the presence of several Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria inoculated at 107 CFU/10 mL. The time for detection was approximately 16.5 hours for E. coli O157:H7 inoculated at 10 CFU/10 mL of sterile 0.8% NaCl containing 5 g of vegetable. The limit of detection was considered to be 2 CFU g-1 vegetable.

Short Communication
  • Yuuichi Ishida, Eishi Sakai, Katsuo Sato, Einori Sugiyama, Kazuyuki Mi ...
    Type: Short Communication
    2018 Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 151-155
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 21, 2018
    [Advance publication] Released: November 21, 2018
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    Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Enteritidis (SE) is one of the major causes of food poisoning. Much effort has been made to develop a vaccine for the prevention of SE colonization and infection in poultry. However, the effect of inactivated whole-cell SE vaccines on the bacterial attachment has not been clarified. This study investigated the immune responses to a killed whole-cell SE vaccine in chickens and the effect of vaccination on the bacterial attachment of SE to cultured Vero cells. A 1 ml dose of 108–109 CFU viable SE bacterial cells was orally administered to chickens at 4 weeks or 10 months post vaccination. The number (CFU) of SE in 1 g of cecal droppings was counted on day 6 after administration. The SE CFUs were significantly lower (p < 0.05) in the vaccinated chickens, not only at 4 weeks but also at 10 months after vaccination, than in the unvaccinated control chickens. Anti-SE IgG and anti-SE IgA were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in serum and intestinal and oviduct fluid samples from vaccinated chickens. Adhesion of heat-killed SE cells to Vero cells was reduced by pre-treatment of the bacteria by the vaccinated chicken-derived intestinal fluid, indicating the potential of the vaccine-induced antibody to prevent SE adhesion to epithelial cell surfaces.

  • Ayumi Nakatsuchi, Mizuho Inagaki, Michiyo Sugiyama, Masaru Usui, Tetsu ...
    Type: Short Communication
    2018 Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 156-159
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 21, 2018
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    Fluoroquinolone is widely used for the treatment of bacterial diseases, and the emergence of quinolone resistance has become a serious concern in recent years, owing to an increase and inappropriate use of antimicrobials. Here, we attempted to understand the differences in the emergence frequency of quinolone-resistant bacterial variants in three Salmonella serotypes S. Infantis, S. Schwarzengrund, and S. Manhattan—which are mainly found in broiler industries in Japan. Emergence frequency tests for quinolone-resistant variants using enrofloxacin-containing agar plates and sequence analysis in the quinolone resistance-determining region (QRDR) of gyrA in DNA gyrase were performed. The results showed no significant difference in the emergence frequency among the three serotypes, and most of the resistant variants had mutations in the QRDR region. These findings suggest that differences in the serotypes tested are not associated with the emergence frequency of quinolone-resistant variants.

Risk Assessment Report
  • Food Safety Commission of Japan
    Type: Summary
    2018 Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 160-161
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 21, 2018
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    The Food Safety Commission of Japan (FSCJ) conducted a self-tasking assessment of mycotoxins, fumonisin B1 (FB1 CAS No. 116355-83-0), fumonisin B2 (FB2 CAS No. 116355-84-1), and fumonisin B3 (FB3 CAS No. 136379-59-4). Hepatotoxicity and/or nephrotoxicity were commonly observed in experimental animals given orally purified FB1, and the sex-related differences were observed in rats and mice. Species differences were also identified: Increased incidences of liver tumors in female mice and of kidney tumors in male rats were observed in chronic toxicity/carcinogenicity studies. Fumonisins did not show appreciable genotoxicity both the in vivo and in vitro tests. FSCJ judged fumonisins as non-genotoxic carcinogens from the results of various toxicological studies on fumonisins, and thus specified a tolerable daily intake (TDI) of 2 μg/mg bw/day for fumonisins (FB1, FB2 and FB3, alone or by combination), after applying an uncertainty factor of 100 to the lowest no-observed-adverse-effect level (NOAEL) of 0.21 mg/kg bw/day in subacute toxicity study in rats. The estimated exposure levels of fumonisins among high consumers such as toddlers are still below the TDI. Therefore, FSCJ concluded that adverse effect of fumonisin on human health through food are unlikely under the current situation in Japan.

  • Food Safety Commission of Japan
    Type: Risk assessment report
    2018 Volume 6 Issue 4 Pages 162-163
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 21, 2018
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    In the toxicological evaluation of pesticides (agricultural chemicals), their toxicities have been evaluated based on studies in rodents such as rats and mice as well as in non-rodents such as rabbits and dogs. Here, reflecting a research performed under the Food Safety Commission of Japan (FSCJ) grant on pesticide toxicity study1), international trends and also scientific points of view, the necessity of chronic dog toxicity studies was reconsidered for the use in toxicological evaluation of pesticides.

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