Global Health & Medicine
Online ISSN : 2434-9194
Print ISSN : 2434-9186
Current issue
Showing 1-10 articles out of 10 articles from the selected issue
Editorial
  • Douglas D. Richman
    Type: editorial
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 1-5
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: February 11, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The speed of development and the magnitude of efficacy of recently developed vaccines directed against SARS-CoV-2 has been truly remarkable. This editorial will not summarize the highly publicized and reviewed information about the design and clinical trial results of these vaccines. Rather, I will speculate about several issues regarding i) considerations of the rollout and implementation of the multiple vaccines, ii) the use of the vaccines in ways different from those used in the registrational phase 3 studies, iii) the future both of SARS-CoV-2 in the human population and of "normal" human life returning after widespread vaccination, and iv) the implications of the success of these SARS-CoV-2 vaccines for vaccine development against other pathogens.

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Policy Forum
  • Ikuma Nozaki, Yasuo Sugiura, Noriko Fujita, Hiroyasu Iso, Tamami Umeda
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 6-10
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: November 07, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Japan has been implementing projects of global extension of medical technologies under an official development assistance policy to improve public health and medicine by promoting Japanese medical technologies worldwide. The current work examines the impact and goals of implementing this new scheme. The scheme has involved dozens of projects that sent Japanese experts to partner countries and that invited their counterparts to Japan to showcase Japanese medical technologies. Approximately 50 projects have been implemented in 24 countries over 5 years, and 19,638 individuals have been trained. As a result, the introduced technology was adopted in national guidelines in 4 projects and the introduced equipment was procured in the partner country in 17 projects. In total, 912,334 individuals have benefitted from the introduction of these medical technologies. The concept of "creating shared value" (CSV) could help promote project success by both creating economic value and encouraging social progress. However, the sustainability of that business model remains in question in terms of the internationalization of CSV. Several successful projects improved medical care and led to new business opportunities.

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  • Munehito Machida, Yumiko Miyashita
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 11-14
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: January 17, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Thailand achieved Universal Health Coverage (UHC) in 2002 ahead of other low-middle income countries. Through its experiences, Thailand has actively assisted other developing countries in working towards UHC. However, Thailand is now facing new challenges such as increasing healthcare costs, differing service coverage and purchasing mechanisms among its three health care schemes, and the impact of a rapidly aging population on its health systems. Thailand requested technical support from the Japanese government. Japan achieved UHC in 1961 and its extensive experience of introducing and implementing UHC is a fitting example for Thailand and other countries struggling toward a stable health care system. Thus, the partnership project for Global Health and Universal Health Coverage was launched in July 2016 as a four-year flagship project for "North-South-South Cooperation". Japan and Thailand will further focus to support other countries to achieve UHC, which will be conducive to promoting leading roles of the two countries in the global health arena.

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Review
  • Hidekatsu Yanai, Hiroshi Yoshida
    Type: review-article
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 15-23
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: December 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Dyslipidemia is classified into primary and secondary types. Primary dyslipidemia is basically inherited and caused by single or multiple gene mutations that result in either overproduction or defective clearance of triglycerides and cholesterol. Secondary dyslipidemia is caused by unhealthy lifestyle factors and acquired medical conditions, including underlying diseases and applied drugs. Secondary dyslipidemia accounts for approximately 30-40% of all dyslipidemia. Secondary dyslipidemia should be treated by finding and addressing its causative diseases or drugs. For example, treatment of secondary dyslipidemia, such as hyperlipidemia due to hypothyroidism, by using statin without controlling hypothyroidism, may lead to myopathy and serious adverse events such as rhabdomyolysis. Differential diagnosis of secondary dyslipidemia is very important for safe and effective treatment. Here, we describe an overview about diseases and drugs that interfere with lipid metabolism leading to secondary dyslipidemia. Further, we show the association of each secondary dyslipidemia with atherosclerosis and the treatments for such dyslipidemia.

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  • Hiroshi Takumida, Yuichiro Takeda, Go Naka
    Type: review-article
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 24-30
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: January 29, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This paper provides an overview of perioperative treatment for non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC), including the current widespread use of cytotoxic anticancer agents, promising molecular targeted agents, and immuno-checkpoint inhibitors. Multiple clinical trials have confirmed that postoperative chemotherapy with cytotoxic anticancer agents should be given for stage IIB to III (according to the 8th edition of the TNM classification for NSCLC) if possible, and preoperative treatment also is recommended for patients with N2 or higher stage. However, advances in concurrent chemoradiotherapy are expected to change the significance of neoadjuvant therapy. Perioperative treatment with molecular targeted agents appears to extend disease-free survival, but there is currently no evidence that it can extend overall survival. Perioperative treatment with immune checkpoint inhibitors requires further evidence but is likely to be effective. Although perioperative treatment of NSCLC could be costly it continues to evolve in hopes of a cure.

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  • Shusuke Yagi, Kazuhiko Yamada, Masayoshi Terayama, Hitomi Wake, Naoki ...
    Type: review-article
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 31-36
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: December 20, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The most common treatment for advanced gastric cancer (AGC) is systemic chemotherapy. The standard treatment for advanced gastric cancer differs worldwide. In Japan, two phase III clinical trials demonstrated the non-inferiority of S-1 compared with 5-fluorouracil (5-FU) and superiority of cisplatin plus S-1 (CS), compared with S-1, with respect to overall survival (SPIRITS trial). Oxaliplatin (L-OHP) has a favorable toxicity profile compared with cisplatin; hence, a phase III clinical trial (G-SOX trial) demonstrated the progression-free survival (PFS) and overall survival in CS was 5.4 and 13.1 months and those in SOX was 5.5 and 14.1 months, respectively. Serious adverse events were more frequently seen in CS than in SOX. So, SOX is as effective as CS for advanced gastric cancer with favorable safety profile. After the publication of this G-SOX trial, the combination of oral or intravenous 5-FU and various doses of L-OHP have been reported. And FOLFOX6 regimen (FOLFOX: a combination of 1-LV and FU with L-OHP) was approved for the treatment of AGC in Japan in 2017. FOLFOX was promising for patients with severe peritoneal metastasis from AGC, because the FOLFOX regimen does not require hydration and does not include oral agents. This review summarizes the efficacy and safety of doublet combinations of platinum and fluoropyrimidines using L-OHP for advanced gastric cancer.

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Original Article
  • Lalla Soundous Elkhaili El Alami, Asuka Nemoto, Yoshinori Nakata
    Type: research-article
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 37-43
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: December 08, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The solution of sharing electronic health records (EHR) with patients has the potential to improve patients' understanding and remembering of their health information. We call this solution the patient open-EHR. In Japan, this solution is not yet widespread, and experiences of actual users are not known. Our aim is to explore the needs and satisfaction of patients who are actually using one patient open-EHR system in Japan that allows registered patients online access to part of their EHR. A cross-sectional study was done using an online questionnaire. Patients registered with our patient open-EHR system were invited to participate by posting an invitation message on the system login page and sending them invitation emails. We investigated their needs regarding the system and their views regarding the system's ability to improve their understanding, remembering, and other perspectives. Answers from 95 patients, collected between August 10 and October 20, 2019 were analyzed. The need to further understand and remember the information received from the doctor was among the top four reasons behind using the system. However, only 48% of patients agreed that the system improved their remembering and 68% agreed that it improved their understanding. Thirty-seven percent of respondents expressed dissatisfaction with access to only blood test results and prescriptions. Despite this dissatisfaction, respondents were positive about the future of the system. Hospitals need to recognize the needs of patients and to consider them when providing patient open-EHR service. The EHR has potential not only for hospitals but also for patients.

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Communication
  • Rei Haruyama, Hiromi Obara, Noriko Fujita
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 44-47
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: September 30, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Following the global call to action by the World Health Organization (WHO), the world is currently moving to eliminate cervical cancer as a public health problem. To eliminate the cancer within this century, which is defined as an age-adjusted cervical cancer incidence rate (ASIR) below 4 per 100,000 women, WHO recommends all countries to achieve "90-70-90" targets for human papilloma virus (HPV) vaccination, cervical cancer screening, and treatment of precancer and cancer by 2030. In Japan, ASIR has been rising since the late 1990s to 11.1 per 100,000 women, and this rise is particularly prominent in women of reproductive age. HPV vaccination coverage is as low as 0.3%, largely due to the Government’s ongoing suspension of proactive recommendations for the vaccine. Given the absence of centralized, population-based cervical cancer screening program and a nationwide surveillance system for systematic monitoring, the exact screening participation rate and treatment rate are difficult to estimate. A national survey suggested that only around 40% of women between the ages of 20 and 69 years underwent cervical cancer screening within the last two years. National policies and systems for HPV vaccination and screening should be updated in a more efficient way as new evidence and innovations become available. In the wake of powerful global momentum, actions must be taken now to further enhance cervical cancer control and ensure that Japanese girls and women are no longer left behind.

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  • Ikuma Nozaki, Thida Aung, Nwe Nwe Oo, Haruka Kodoi, Yui Ito, Takashi I ...
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 48-51
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: November 07, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The National Center for Global Health and Medicine has long collaborated with the blood program in Myanmar, and the Center started a new project in 2015 to enhance blood transfusion safety as part of a new set of projects of global extension of medical technologies that aims to improve public health and medicine in developing countries under public-private partnerships. The project resulted in remarkable achievements, including maintaining a high proportion of voluntary blood donations despite a rapidly growing demand for blood, ensuring blood safety from the donor to the recipient, and creating public-private partnerships. The project supported the introduction of blood grouping using the tube method at hospital blood banks, safety measures during blood transfusions, and effective use of blood products including component blood. The project identified the need for medical devices such as leukocyte filters, serofuges, and refrigerators to store blood products. The success of the project may depend on mutual understanding and trust based on the duration of collaboration, improvement of the requirement for medical safety (including blood safety) in the country, and shifting the mindset of partner companies in public-private partnerships to create new demand by encouraging improvement of the quality of care and requiring the safety of medical care. In this era of sustainable development goals, the hopes are that these experiences will help other countries seeking to improve their public health through public-private partnerships.

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  • Yuzuru Kono, Eiichi Shimizu, Futoshi Matsunaga, Yuriko Egami, Kohei Yo ...
    2021 Volume 3 Issue 1 Pages 52-55
    Published: February 28, 2021
    Released: March 15, 2021
    [Advance publication] Released: February 18, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is one of the leading causes of death in adults in Zambia among the non-communicable diseases. The Government of the Republic of Zambia through the Ministry of Health procured Japanese radiological systems, computed tomography, and angiography for the University Teaching Hospitals (UTHs) – Adult in 2015. However, the operation of these diagnostic systems has not been optimal due to lack of a proper maintenance service plan, lack of competent health professionals, and erratic supply of medical consumables. In this study, we report our experiences of providing intensive training to multidisciplinary healthcare teams of the radiology department at UTHs – Adult from 2017 to 2019 to strengthen the quality management system of the radiological equipment so as to provide effective healthcare services. However, the COVID-19 pandemic has had enormous negative impact on essential healthcare. Long-term support through continuous hands-on training must be provided to establish sustainable healthcare services.

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