Japanese Journal of Sign Language Studies
Online ISSN : 2187-218X
Print ISSN : 1884-3204
ISSN-L : 1884-3204
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Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    2018 Volume 27 Pages 5
    Published: November 30, 2018
    Released: December 06, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Naoko ONO
    2018 Volume 27 Pages 7-15
    Published: November 30, 2018
    Released: December 06, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Sign language is the oldest form of community interpreting in Japan. Sign language and verbal interpreting belong to the same category of community interpreting; however, the interaction of education systems for the two has largely been ignored. In this study, a literature review was conducted, focusing on similarities and differences among training systems for sign language interpreters and verbal interpreters in Japan. It was found that some training methods exist that use both sign language and verbal interpreting. The findings indicate that future educational systems for sign language interpreting could include the following training content of verbal interpreting: quick responses; sight translation; Dynamic Listening & Speaking; and interpreting tips and theory. The suggested training methods could improve Japanese Sign Language interpreter training and education while being amenable to integration in practical settings.

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  • Mayumi Shirasawa
    2018 Volume 27 Pages 17-27
    Published: November 30, 2018
    Released: December 06, 2019
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Academic sign language interpreting, conducted in university lectures, academic conferences, or collegia, require different skill sets compared to community interpreting because of its complexity and depth of content. This paper illustrates these skills as well as the difficulties surrounding them on the basis of recent studies conducted in this field to provide meaningful insight into interpreter training and development. By focusing on translating terms, conveying logical flow and points of contention, and describing modalities and degrees, this study reveals several difficulties in academic interpreting observed in interpreter translation. The results point out the importance of (1) knowledge of contents and terms, (2) proficiency in sign language features such as non-manual markers, (3) familiarization and understanding of registers used in the academic field, and (4) awareness of logical flow or lecture perspective.

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