Journal of Research for Nursing Education
Online ISSN : 2432-0242
Print ISSN : 0917-6314
ISSN-L : 0917-6314
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Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
  • A View of the Development of Science of Nursing Education Through the Main Themes and Keynote Lectures of an Academic Conference
    Toshiko Nakayama, Naomi Funashima, Midori Sugimori
    2021 Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 1-8
    Published: March 31, 2021
    Released: August 06, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Japan Academic Society of Nursing Education established in April 1991, was renamed from the Research Group for Nursing Education, which was founded in February 1986. Since its establishment, the main activities of the Japan Academic Society of Nursing Education have been the annual academic conference and regular monthly meetings. As a result of analysis, it can be seen that the main themes from the first academic conference may be classified into the following four stages. Stage I (1991-1998): the systematization of science of the nursing education and development of research methodology; Stage II (1997-2004): the occupational autonomy of nurses and establishment of the profession; Stage III (1994-2009・2019): the utilization of research results in practice; StageⅣ (2010-2018): education and research that leads to the professional development of nurses. Also, the analysis shows that a field of study called “science of nursing education” was established and developed through clarification of the definition and scope of the research, development of the research methodology and systematization of the research of the science of nursing education over 30 years. Furthermore, it was confirmed that these processes were tied to the realization of the concept of the science of nursing education “utilization of research results in practice” and to the achievement of its purpose “support for the occupational development of the individual nurse”.
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  • Nobuko Yamashita
    2021 Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 9-15
    Published: March 31, 2021
    Released: August 06, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    ‘Lifework’ means the work and achievements that a person has dedicated their life to completing. Twenty years ago, the author tried to conceptualize student behaviors in the nursing clinical practicum in order to better understand them. The reason for this research was a desire to overcome own problems in clinical teaching.
    Even after this research was completed, ‘researches to understand students’ are still underway from different point of view. Through the process of continuing such researches, ‘researches to understand students’ have become the author’s lifework. In this article, three researches are introduced, and the process that continued after they were conducted is looked back on. Furthermore, the factors that ‘researches to understand students’ have become the author’s lifework are presented.
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  • Mika Hattori, Naomi Funashima
    2021 Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 17-31
    Published: March 31, 2021
    Released: August 06, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to identify the problems faced by hospital’s staff nurses in their work. A questionnaire survey conducted by mail was carried out with 1,129 staff nurses working at 46 hospitals from which consent was obtained to participate in the study among hospitals across the country. The questionnaire consisted of open-ended questions on the problems that staff nurses face in their work and questions on the attributes of the subjects. The number of questionnaires collected was 637 (56.4%). The descriptions of 236 staff nurses who responded “Yes” to the question of whether they faced problems at work and gave specific accounts of those problems were analyzed using the qualitative analysis in nursing education based on Berelson’s content analysis method. The results revealed 51 types of problems that hospital’s staff nurses face in their work, including, e.g., a)Role performance friction between nursing professionals and family members, b)Extended working hours because work cannot be completed within regular working hours, c)Deterioration in working conditions due to nurse shortage, d)Accumulated fatigue due to irregular work shifts and multiple work burdens, e)Staff teaching difficulty due to lack of knowledge or skills needed to teach. The rate of agreement of category classifications was ≧80% according to the formula of Scott, indicating that the reliability of categories was ensured. As a result of the consideration, these 51 types of problems were suggested a way to support for their problem-solving.
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  • Aiming for Achievement of Nursing Clinical Practicum Goals by Students and Quality Assurance of Medical Treatment for Patients
    Naomi Isene, Toshiko Nakayama, Naomi Funashima
    2021 Volume 30 Issue 1 Pages 33-47
    Published: March 31, 2021
    Released: August 06, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study was to develop a self-evaluation scale for assessing the roles of ward nurses involved in nursing clinical practicum instruction. This study consisted of 4 phases: a) item generation based on findings from qualitative research, b) assurance of the content aspect of construct validity by panel experts and a pilot study, c) item analysis and selection using a survey, and d) evaluation of the reliability and validity of the scale. A 5-point Likert scale was used, comprising 56 items classified into 8 subscales that were based on 19 concepts of behaviors of ward nurses involved in nursing clinical practicum instruction. In the first survey, forms were mailed to 910 ward nurses of 96 randomly sampled hospitals, and 415 valid datasets were analyzed. A total of 32 items were selected based on item analysis. A factor analysis of the scale of 32 items extracted 8 factors that were reflective of the 8 subscales. Chronbach’s alpha of the scale was .944 and Chronbach’s alpha of the 8 subscales ranged from .723 to .835. All hypotheses were verified using the known-groups technique. Moreover, there were significant correlations between the scores of the scale and the scores of the Educational Needs Assessment Tool for Clinical Instructors. In the second survey, forms were mailed to 178 ward nurses of 13 hospitals, and 52 valid datasets were analyzed. The test-retest reliability correlation was .917. The reliability and validity of the finalized scale comprising 32 items classified into 8 subscales were confirmed.
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