Bulletin of the Japanese Society of Prosthetics and Orthotics
Online ISSN : 1884-0566
Print ISSN : 0910-4720
ISSN-L : 0910-4720
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Showing 1-18 articles out of 18 articles from the selected issue
  • Manabu YOSHIMURA, Katsutoshi SENOO, Keiko INOUE, Hiroki TOMIYAMA, Keng ...
    2020 Volume 36 Issue 2 Pages 130-137
    Published: April 01, 2020
    Released: April 15, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The purpose of this research is to verify the cause of malfunction of a myoelectric prosthesis. Subjects were 14 healthy adults wearing simulated artificial hands. Shearing force and pressure at elbow flexion and extension were measured with a thin sensor. Three sensors were affixed in the socket : 1) Outer electrode installation position (outer part), 2) 2.5 cm above the olecranon (above the olecranon), and 3) Inner electrode installation position (inside part). Shear forces at elbow flexion and extension had low values. Therefore, it was difficult to conclude that malfunction occurred due to the electrode being displaced on the skin. On the other hand, the pressure was significantly lower in the inner part than outer part. This result showed that the inner part was liable to cause poor contact with the stump compared to the outer part. It is suggested that this likelihood is one of the factors behind the malfunction of a myoelectric prosthesis.

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  • Masato MIGITA, Hitoshi MARUYAMA, Sumiko YAMAMOTO
    2020 Volume 36 Issue 2 Pages 138-142
    Published: April 01, 2020
    Released: April 15, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    This study was conducted to clarify whether the type of orthosis and physical function of the patient affect the time of wearing an orthosis, focusing on wearing of ankle foot orthoses by stroke patients. We studied 19 stroke patients in chronic phase, and measured the wearing time using three types of ankle foot orthosis: shoe horn brace, ankle foot orthosis with joint, and Gait Solution Design (GSD). After confirming the effect of the dominant hand, we analyzed the wearing time of each of the orthoses according to Brunnstrom recovery stage. The results showed that the wearing time was shortest for the ankle foot orthosis with joint, and suggest that the mobility of the ankle joint of the orthosis and the position of the lower leg strap affect the wearing time. Wearing the GSD took time, and guidance was required when wearing this orthosis.

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  • Shinya NISHIMURA, Yuki ITO, Ryoko UESATO, Kazutomo MIURA, Eiichi TSUDA
    2020 Volume 36 Issue 2 Pages 143-145
    Published: April 01, 2020
    Released: April 15, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Conservative treatment is the first choice for treating ulnar-side wrist pain, and splinting is commonly used. In this study, we examined the effectiveness of splinting in treating ulnar-side wrist pain. Eighteen patients with 18 hands that underwent splinting for ulnar-side wrist pain were studied. Pain at rest and pain during movement were measured using the visual analog scale (VAS), and the results obtained at the initial evaluation and final evaluation were compared. Final evaluation was possible in 13 patients (13 hands). In these patients, both pain at rest and pain during movement were significantly reduced (p<0.01) at the final evaluation. These results suggest that wearing a splint improves the adaptation of the distal radioulnar joint and reduces the pain during movement. However, the detailed dynamics of the distal radioulnar joint during splint wearing has not been elucidated, and further study is needed.

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  • Masaki ISHIGURO, Shinya OKAMOTO, Kaito TODA, Mitsuhiro HAYANO, Takuma ...
    2020 Volume 36 Issue 2 Pages 146-149
    Published: April 01, 2020
    Released: April 15, 2021
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The purpose of this study is to assist the hip extension moment in the paralytic side loading response using the hip joint extension assist type walking assist device ACSIVE and to investigate the effects on the paralyzed hip joint of hemiplegic stroke patients. The subjects were 12 hemiplegic stroke patients. With ACSIVE, the hip flexion angle at initial contact was reduced, and the hip maximum extension angle during stance phase was increased. The maximum hip joint extension moment decreased during the loading response, and the maximum hip joint flexion moment increased during the stance phase. Using ACSIVE leads to an increase in the maximum hip joint extension angle and hip joint flexion moment during the stance phase. It is thought that gait ability can be improved by walking using ACSIVE.

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