Spine Surgery and Related Research
Online ISSN : 2432-261X
ISSN-L : 2432-261X
CASE REPORT
Surgical treatment for suicidal jumper's fracture (unstable sacral fracture) with thoracolumbar burst fracture: a report of three cases
Shotaro FujinoMasayuki MiyagiShuichiro TajimaTakayuki ImuraRyo TazawaGen InoueToshiyuki NakazawaWataru SaitoEiki ShirasawaHiroaki MineharaTerumasa MatsuuraTadashi KawamuraKentaro UchidaNaonobu TakahiraMasashi Takaso
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JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS

2017 Volume 1 Issue 2 Pages 100-106

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Abstract

Introduction: Suicidal jumper's fracture (unstable sacral fracture) is characterized not only by multiple fractures including thoracolumbar fractures, but also major chest and abdominal injuries. Early stabilization of these fractures and early ambulation are required for the treatment and management of chest and abdominal injuries. We present 3 cases of suicidal jumper's fracture with thoracolumbar burst fracture, treated with minimally invasive posterior fixation surgery, which is a combination of percutaneous pedicle screws (PPS) and the mini-open Galveston technique.

Case reports: Case 1. A 50-year-old woman was injured by a fall from the 5th floor of a building as the result of a suicide attempt. Computed tomography revealed an H-shaped unstable sacral fracture and thoracolumbar fractures with major chest and abdominal injuries. For early stabilization of spinopelvic instability and early ambulation, we treated the patient with PPS and the mini-open Galveston technique. Her early postoperative emergence from bedrest contributed to the improvement of her general condition. One year after surgery at the final follow-up, she was able to walk with a T-cane without any motor, bladder, or bowel dysfunction (BBD) and achieved almost complete healing of the fractures. Cases 2 and 3. A 25-year-old woman (Case 2) and a 43-year-old woman were injured in falls. They had multiple injuries including unstable sacral fractures, and thoracolumbar fractures with major chest and abdominal injuries. We treated these patients with PPS and the mini-open Galveston technique. One year after surgery, they were able to walk with a T-cane and achieved almost complete healing of thoracolumbar fractures, but delayed healing of an unstable sacral fracture in Case 2, and remaining BBD in Case 3.

Conclusion: PPS and the mini-open Galveston technique is a good approach to fixation because they are minimally invasive and provide moderately rigid fixation, especially in patients with multiple trauma whose general condition is poor.

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© 2017 The Japanese Society for Spine Surgery and Related Research.

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