Science of Cookery
Online ISSN : 2186-5795
Print ISSN : 0910-5360
ISSN-L : 0910-5360
Current issue
Showing 1-16 articles out of 16 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 247-248
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (256K)
  • Asako Hatai, Ichiro Okuse, Koichi Saga, Yasuyoshi Nagaoka
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 248-252
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the previous paper, the present authors reported the influences exerted by different soil types for Azuki planting on the inorganic composition in beans (cv. Erimo-Shouzu) in Tokachi region of Hokkaido. This study dealt with the influences exerted by different soil types on the organic composition of the beans, using the same materials as the previous paper. The results obtained were summarized as follows;
    1) The content of crude fat and oil was higher in the beans produced from brown volcanic soils and black volcanic soils, compared with the beans produced from alluvial soils.
    2) Seven kinds of sugars, namely, fructose, glucose, sucrose, gentiobiose, raffinose, stachyose and verbascose were identified in the Azuki beans by means of thin layer chromatography. The total sugar content was lower in the beans produced from black volcanic soils and peat soils, compared with those produced from alluvial soils and brown volcanic soils.
    3) The starch content was higher in the beans produced from alluvial soils, however, there was no difference among the beans produced from other soil types.
    4) The soluble nitrogen content was less than 1% of the total nitrogen. The protein content was lower in the beans produced from alluvial soils, compared with those produced other soil types.
    5) From above data, we conclude that the organic composition in Azuki beans, as well as their inorganic composition, was affected by the different soil types used for planting.
    Download PDF (883K)
  • Fumiko Naito, Yoko Aoyama, Koki Fujita, Setsuko Takahashi
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 253-259
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Lactosucrose is a hardly digestible saccharide which is obtained from lactose and sucrose and has intense activity in promoting the growth of bifid bacteria. To examine the effects of this lactosucrose on the physical properties and taste of marshmallow, marshmallows were prepared by substituting 25,50 and 100% of sucrose with lactosucrose. The Control contained 100% sucrose (no lactosucrose). The breaking strength of each sample was measured with a creep meter, texture was determined with a rheolometer, and taste was evaluated by a sensory evaluation. The results obtained are as follows.
    1. Compared with marshmallow prepared by using 100% sucrose, that prepared by using a lactosucrose powder (LS-55P) showed greater firmness and required greater breaking energy, which indicated that lactosucrose imparted a more elastic and tougher texture to marshmallow.
    2. Marshmallow prepared by substituting 25% of sucrose with lactosucrose showed physical properties closely similar to those of the control sample. When 50% or more of the sucrose was substituted by lactosucrose, the firmness increased remarkably, but the breaking strain and the cohesiveness were scarcely affected.
    3. The firmness of 3 types of commercially-made marshmallow (ie. made with 0% lactosucrose)widely varied from 1.44 to 2.75. Four marshmallow samples, prepared with varying percentages of lactosucrose in our laboratory, showed intermediate firmness, from 1.39 to 2.30.
    4. The results of the sensory evaluation indicated that the marshmallow sample prepared by substituting 25% of sucrose with lactosucrose was closely similar to the control in taste characteristics and had excellent biteability and solubility in the mouth. These facts suggest that this product is comparable to the control sample. On the other hand, the sample prepared by using 100% of lactosucrose was not much liked owing to a greater toughness and a low level of sweetness.
    5. The marshmallow prepared by using 100% of lactosucrose was very hard and had a rigid body, which made it possible to reduce the amount of gelatin, which was employed as a gelling agent, from a regular 6% to 5%.
    Download PDF (1176K)
  • Fujiko Kawamura, Mayumi Nakamura
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 260-264
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The antioxidative effects of aromatic components and eluted components on the boiling lard with the equal amounts of ginger and lemon were examined, assuming the use of vegetables and fruits in addition to ginger when cooking pork. The results obtained are as follows.
    1. Limonene accounts for 75% of the aromatic components of boiled lemon and small amounts of γ-terpinene, citral andβ-pinene are detected. The aromatic components of boiled ginger and lemon consist primarily of limonene followed by citral andβ-phellandrene and also contain sesquiterpenes such as zingiberene and farnesene.
    2. The antioxidative effects of the aromatic components of boiled ginger and lemon wiih respect to lard were the same as in the case of ginger alone.
    3. Antioxidative effects of the eluted components in the case of boiling lard with ginger and lemon were much more prominent than in the case of ginger alone and effects resulting from the addition of lemon were observed.
    4. The effects of addition of lemon were considered to be resulting from the synergistic action of ascorbic acid and citric acid on the antioxidative components of ginger.
    Download PDF (765K)
  • Hiroshi Ito, Kouko Toyomaki
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 265-270
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Fruits of Marumero (Quince, Cydonia oblonga Mill. ) have a specific flavor. The fresh furits are not suitable to be eaten because of hard and strong acid taste.
    The Marumero soft drink was prepared from the fruits juice, sweetener (lactosucrose), flavoring agent (maltosyl-cyclodextrin and ascorbic acid) and the supercritical carbone dioxide extracts.
    The ingredients of Marumero soft drink was determined by sensory test consisting of the panell of twenty female students of Akita Junior College.
    As the result of sensory test, the best combination of Marumero soft drink was as follow;
    Marumero juice 90% Sweetener (Lactosucrose) 10 Maltosyl-cyclodextrin 0.5 Ascorbic acid 0.1
    Download PDF (751K)
  • Takahisa Minamide, Akiko Hasegawa, Akemi Hata
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 271-276
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The effect of adding green tea powder (0.5,1.0,1.5,2.0% (w/v) of tofu-gel) on the properties and ingredients of tofu-gel coagulated with glucono-deltalacton was studied. The moisture content of tofu-gel was decreased, and the draining rate was increased with the addition of green tea powder. The value of lightness of tofu-gel with green tea powder determined by the color and color difference meter was decreased and it's chroma and hue-angle were increased. The texture of tofu-gel to which 1.0% of green tea powder was added was softer than that without green tea powder. The amounts of iron, magnesium, calcium, and potassium in tofu-gel were increased with the addition of green tea powder. The heat stability on color and texture of tofu-gel with green tea powder was lower and the limit of boiling time was 7.5minute for 0.5% and 2.5 minute for 1.0% respectively.
    From these results, it was found that the properties and ingredients of tofu-gel were improved by green tea powder.
    Download PDF (944K)
  • Hisako Murota, Teruko Nakano
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 277-281
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Effect of xylooligosaccharide content (10,20,30% of standard of sweetness) on the texture of chiffon cake was studied. Physical property were mesured with creep meter and the color difference meter, and a sensory test was evaluated. The specific gravity of both cake batter and cake decreased with an increase in its additional quantity. The hardness, gumminess and cohesiveness of all cakes tended to decrease wfth increasing oligosaccharide content. It can be concluded that the increase of oligosaccharide content gave more brownish color, and softness to the cake.
    Significant difference was obtained in all sensory attributes (appearance, tastiness, sweetness, dampish, resistance to the teeth, and total acceptance.)
    Download PDF (760K)
  • Machiko Adachi
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 282-286
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to study the preliminary treatment of chicken bones for soup stock, and to clarify its effects on the soup stock, the sensory tests, and the analyses of extractable compounds and odor compounds were carried out. From the result of sensory tests, ckiken-bone soup stock was evaluated to have a better quality when the bones were preliminarily treated with boiling water, or soaked in water for 30 minutes, or boiled, than when they were only washed with water, because the odor of chicken bones was decreased though umani taste was a little declined.
    Moreover, this result was well evidenced by the analyses of the extractable and odor compounds.
    Download PDF (720K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 287-293
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (7722K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 294-301
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (1782K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 302-307
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (973K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 308-316
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (3931K)
  • Takesi Sibata
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 317-320
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (605K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 321-325
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (10109K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 326-331
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (967K)
  • [in Japanese]
    1994 Volume 27 Issue 4 Pages 332-338
    Published: November 20, 1994
    Released: April 26, 2013
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (1011K)
feedback
Top