Teaching English through movies : ATEM journal
Online ISSN : 2433-1929
Print ISSN : 1342-9914
Volume 12
Showing 1-10 articles out of 10 articles from the selected issue
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 12 Pages Cover1-
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (40K)
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 12 Pages Cover2-
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (40K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 12 Pages App1-
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
  • Naoko Osuka
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 12 Pages 3-12
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    The purpose of this study is to examine the effectiveness of two ways of using movies for English teaching: using the same movie from the beginning to the end and using segments of different movies. Both ways seem to have merits and demerits. In order to compare the effectiveness, two classes were taught in different ways. The results of the post-test revealed that both ways were effective in improving students' listening ability, and there was no significant difference between them. On the other hand, the results of the post-questionnaire indicated that using the same movie from the beginning to the end was more effective in terms of enhancing students' motivation.
    Download PDF (486K)
  • Natsuki Matsui
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 12 Pages 13-23
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    The choice between the double object and dative constructions is determined to a great extent by information structure, as pointed out by Rappaport Hovav and Levin (2005). That is, the occurrence of dative alternation is largely due to "focus shift." This paper argues that it is not an entailment but an implicature whether "a transfer of possession" is completed successfully in the event denoted by the double object construction as is often claimed in the literature. We should shed more light on the information structure when these two constructions with dative verbs are introduced in classroom. The paper also suggests that using DVD is extremely useful for introducing such linguistics theory in a classroom since students can have three kinds of information: literal, auditory, and visual one. Especially, using lines in a sitcom as teaching aids helps students learn more effectively.
    Download PDF (598K)
  • Chiyomi Amino
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 12 Pages 24-40
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    The past six years of teaching have been challenging for the researcher since most of her students have had no interest in learning English. At which stage did the students lose their interest in English? Is there any way that students can regain their motivation to learn English? These questions have always been with the researcher because no matter how hard a teacher tries, if the students have no interest in learning English, his/her classes will end in vain. In this paper the researcher will show how she creates her classes in such a manner that they motivate students and how effective her classes are due to her use of movies as learning materials. To give evidence of this success, she tested students twice during the semester of 15 weeks. She also conducted surveys on the degree of the students' motivation in terms of learning English. The first test was done immediately after semester started and the second was carried out at the end of semester. The test results and motivation surveys give English teachers a hint of how just two or threeminute movie segments can inspire students' interest in learning English. The researcher previously presented sections of this paper at the ATEM Conference in Tokyo, July 1, 2006.
    Download PDF (730K)
  • Hiromi Akimoto, Mayumi Hamada
    Type: Article
    2007 Volume 12 Pages 41-52
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Grammar is probably one of the most difficult and unpopular categories of English study. For most English learners, grammar is about as much fun as a difficult formula in mathematics. That is, learners have to "memorize" it and apply it when answering questions in a test. One solution is to use movies for teaching grammar. Movies are motivating educational material and a rich source of a "real conversation." By using a movie, learners can see, hear, and fully understand how to use a particular grammar point in a meaningful context. Their passive grammar knowledge will become active, reinforced and meaningful. However, movies are generally too difficult, especially for lower-level learners. Most learners seem to find it almost impossible to understand foreign language movies without subtitles. This paper will show a solution for the above problem and demonstrate effective ways of utilizing movie segments to make a variety of exercises including grammar ones.
    Download PDF (609K)
  • Type: Appendix
    2007 Volume 12 Pages App2-
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (32K)
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 12 Pages Cover3-
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (38K)
  • Type: Cover
    2007 Volume 12 Pages Cover4-
    Published: May 07, 2007
    Released: December 09, 2017
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (38K)
feedback
Top