Bulletin of Takenaka Carpentry Tools Museum
Online ISSN : 2436-1453
Print ISSN : 0915-3685
Volume 2
Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from the selected issue
  • Kinya HOSHINO, Kazuo HIRASAWA, Akira WATANABE, Yasumi TSUCHIYA
    1990 Volume 2 Pages 1-7
    Published: 1990
    Released: December 01, 2021
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    The authors prepared six pieces of experimental replica of the saw “KO NOHA GATA”, and carried out a groping test for the purpose of pointing out a right angle of the Fleam (the side angle of a tooth that is usually called a NAGESHI in our country). 1) The profile of the saw teeth is just like an equilateral triangle, and was given a vertical angle of about 55 degrees. 2) Each of the saws was set with the different Fleam angle, from 15 to 40 step 5 degress. 3) Each member of the panel gave his own psychological evaluation on each saw by using the method of pair comparisons. 4) As a results of this experiments, about 35 degress of the Fleam seems to be a suitable angle for this type of saw.
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  • Hiroshi Okimoto
    1990 Volume 2 Pages 8-22
    Published: 1990
    Released: December 01, 2021
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    In Japan the best carpentry blades (chisel, plane) are made of thin blade steels forgewelded to wrought iron. To understand these blades, it is necessary to know the properties of blade materials. However, it is usually unknown what kind of material was used for, especially in the case of tools made by expert blacksmith. This report presents test results on the chemical property, cleanliness and hardness of ten blade material samples (six blade steels and four wrought irons, imported from Europe), provided by Mr. Hidari Kyusaku, one of the most famous blacksmith in Japan. The test showed that carbon content, by which steel hardness was controlled, of the blade steels was 1.13-1.49%, ie. the material is Hyper-eutectoid steel. Two of steels, named of W 6, W 4, contained added tungsten, and the content of nonmetalic inclusion was very low (0.06-0.15%). On the other hand, the carbon content of the wrought iron, used to reinforce the hard and brittle blade steel, was 0.0093-0.081%, and the nonmetalic inclusion content was much greater than in the blade steels. The scientific basis of how pure steel of hight carbon steel is forgewelded to impure iron of low content remain unknown. It would be of great interest to determine exactly how this feat is achieved
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  • Akira Watanabe
    1990 Volume 2 Pages 23-45
    Published: 1990
    Released: December 01, 2021
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT OPEN ACCESS
    According to a study conducted by the Institute for the Science of Labour in 1943,Japanese master carpenters had ”a complete set of 179 tools„. And 26 boring tools were included in it. Then, what kind of boring tools did they use in 17th -19th century? According to this research, the outline of boring tools in Japan of 17th -19th century is the following. (1) At least they used 4 types of boring tools, Yoho -Kiri, Mitsume -Kiri, Tsubo -Kiri and Nezumiba -Kiri. (2) They used ”Mojiri„ for enlarging hole. But in 20th century we can't find it in the tool box of Japanese carpenter. (3) In early 19th century, they used wooden brace at Nagasaki. Generaly in Japan, brace and bits were used in late 19th century or 20th century. (4) Special carpenters for building religion structures used boring tools those we can't find in the documents of 17th -19th century. (5) In the picture scrolls of 17th-19th century, we can find the scenes that carpenters used boring tools. But we can't find them in the picture scrolls before early 16th century. (6) In 17th -19th century iron nails were square edge and wedge shape. Then it was especialy important to make holes by boring tools before nailing.
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