Journal of Atherosclerosis and Thrombosis
Online ISSN : 1880-3873
Print ISSN : 1340-3478
ISSN-L : 1340-3478
Volume 10 , Issue 2
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
Review
  • Jianglin Fan, Teruo Watanabe
    Type: Review
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 63-71
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Atherosclerosis and its complications constitute the most common causes of death in Western societies and Japan. Although several theories or hypotheses about atherogenesis have been proposed during the past decades, none can completely explain the whole process of the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis because this disease is associated with multiple risk factors. In spite of this, the concept that atherosclerosis is a specific form of chronic inflammatory process resulting from interactions between plasma lipoproteins, cellular components ( monocyte/macrophages, T lymphocytes, endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells ) and the extracellular matrix of the arterial wall, is now well accepted. Histologically, atherosclerotic lesions from the early-stage ( fatty streak ) to more complicated lesions possess all the features of chronic inflammation. It has been demonstrated that atherogenic lipoproteins such as oxidized low density lipoprotein ( LDL ), remnant lipoprotein (β - VLDL) and lipoprotein [ Lp ] ( a ) play a critical role in the pro-inflammatory reaction, whereas high density lipoprotein ( HDL ), anti-atherogenic lipoproteins, exert anti-inflammatory functions. In cholesterol-fed animals, the earliest events in the arterial wall during atherogenesis are the adhesion of monocytes and lymphocytes to endothelial cells followed by the migration of these cells into the intima. It has been shown that these early events in atherosclerosis are triggered by the presence of high levels of atherogenic lipoproteins in the plasma and are mediated by inflammatory factors such as adhesion molecules and cytokines in the arterial wall. The development of genetically modified laboratory animals ( transgenic and knock-out mice and transgenic rabbits ) has provided a powerful approach for dissecting individual candidate genes and studying their cause-and-effect relationships in lesion formation and progression. The purpose of this article is to review the recent progress regarding the inflammatory processes during the development of atherosclerosis based on both human and experimental studies. In particular, we will address the mechanisms of atherogenic lipoproteins in terms of inflammatory reactions associated with hypercholesterolemia. Understanding the molecular mechanisms responsible for inflammatory reactions during atherogenesis may help us to develop novel therapeutic strategies to control, treat and prevent atherosclerosis in the future.
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Original Articles
  • Akira Kondo, Jiangzhen Li, Mitsuhisa Manabe, Kazunori Saito, Takashi K ...
    Type: Original Articles
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 72-78
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Several reports have suggested that HDL has anti-oxidative actions. We investigated the relationship between HDL-cholesterol (HDL-C) and malondialdehyde-modified LDL (MDA-LDL) concentrations using enzyme linked immunosolvent assay. We divided our study subjects into four groups on the basis of concentrations of triglyceride (TG) and HDL-C by the following lipid profiles: serum TG ≤ 1.69 mmol/L and HDL-C ≥1.16 mmol/L (control group, n = 26); TG >1.69 and HDL-C ≥1.16 (high TG group, n = 22); TG >1.69 and HDL-C ≤ 0.91 (high TG & low HDL group, n = 67); TG ≤ 1.69 and HDL-C ≤ 0.91 (low HDL group, n = 21). MDA-LDL concentrations, MDA-LDL/apolipoprotein B (apo B) ratio, and LDL size were different between subjects in high TG & low HDL and control groups. MDA-LDL concentrations in both high TG and low HDL groups did not differ significantly from those in the control. However, MDA-LDL/apo B ratio in low HDL group was significantly higher than that in the control (P < 0.05). The MDA-LDL/apo B ratio reflects the extent of MDA modification of apo B in LDL. Therefore, our data suggest that as HDL-C concentrations fall, the extent of MDA modification per one LDL particle increases. Moreover, accompanied by high TG concentration, LDL size in subjects with lower HDL-C concentrations became smaller.
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  • Daisuke Takada, Yoichi Ezura, Shuji Ono, Yasuhiko Iino, Yasuo Katayama ...
    Type: Original Articles
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 79-84
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the course of investigating familial coronary artery disease in Utah, we studied 196 members of an eight-generation extended family of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH), in which 73 members were affected with type IIa hyperlipoproteinemia (HLPIIa; high plasma cholesterol) and 11 members with type IIb hyperlipoproteinemia (HLPIIb; high plasma cholesterol as well as plasma triglyceride). A splice-site mutation of the LDL receptor (LDLR) gene (IVS14 + G > A) co-segregated with elevated plasma cholesterol among all the members, but not with the elevated plasma triglyceride and VLDL cholesterol levels seen in HLPIIb patients. The apolipoprotein H (apoH) gene plays a role in plasma triglyceride removal and lipoprotein lipase enhancement. Intra-familial correlation analysis of the modifier effect of Val247Leu substitution in the apoH gene was carried out among 84 LDLR-mutation carriers and 112 non-carriers. When plasma triglyceride levels in the LDLR-mutation carriers were compared, the values were lowest among V/V homozygotes (mean ± SD = 145 ± 53 mg/dl), highest in L/L homozygotes (277 ± 177 mg/dl), and intermediate among V/L heterozygotes (191 ± 102 mg/dl) (p = 0.0015). All eleven patients who presented with HLPIIb had inherited both the defective LDLR allele and an apoH 247Leu allele, whereas all 45 carriers of the defective LDLR allele not carrying the apoH Leu allele presented with HLPIIa but not HLPIIb (p = 0.0001). These results indicate a significant modification of the phenotype of FH with a defective LDLR allele, by apoH Leu variation in our studied family.
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  • Kenichi Kuremoto, Yoshiro Watanabe, Hirotoshi Ohmura, Kazunori Shimada ...
    Type: Original Articles
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 85-92
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Human paraoxonase (PON1) is an high-density lipoprotein (HDL) -associated enzyme that is proposed to protect against the oxidation of lipoproteins. Recently, the association of coronary artery disease (CAD) and PON1 activity was reported. Furthermore, the R/R genotype of PON1 has been related to the risk for CAD. In this study we investigated the PON1 genotype and susceptibility to lipoprotein oxidation to elucidate the contribution of PON1 to atherosclerosis in Japanese subjects. We studied 179 patients who underwent coronary angiography and their PON1 genotypes were determined. Lipoproteins were obtained from a patient’s blood after at least 12 hours fasting and were separated with sequential ultracentrifugation. We analyzed the thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS) and continuously monitored the copper-induced oxidation three genotype groups. Genotype frequencies of Q / Q, Q / R, and R / R were 21.2%, 36.9%, and 41.9%, respectively. PON1 polymorphism clearly determined the lipid oxidation. The R/R genotype of PON1 had significantly lower levels of plasma and HDL TBARS and significantly retarded the initiation of oxidation in HDL and low-density lipoprotein (LDL). The R/R genotype was related to the lower prevalence of CAD. The PON1 genotype clearly determined the oxidative modification of lipoproteins and may play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis via its protective effect against lipoprotein oxidation in Japanese subjects.
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  • Koji Oida, Kiyokazu Ebata, Hideo Kanehara, Jinya Suzuki, Isamu Miyamor ...
    Type: Original Articles
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 93-98
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The vascular endothelial function of smokers is known to be impaired. This study investigated whether cilostazol could improve the vasodilatory response of the brachial artery to ischemia, an indicator of endothelial function, in ten male smokers. Endothelium-dependent vasodilatation and endothelium-independent vasodilatation of the brachial artery were measured in 11 male non-smokers and 20 male smokers with matching age and weight. The results showed that the vasodilatory response to reactive hyperemia was significantly smaller in the smokers (4.8 ± 1.6%) when compared to that in the non-smokers (7.6 ± 2.5%) (p = 0.0013). However, no significant difference in the vasodilatory response to isosorbide dinitrate was observed between the two groups. In addition, there were no significant differences in serum lipid, Lp (a), or blood homocysteine between the smokers and non-smokers. When 150 mg/day of cilostazol was administered for two weeks, the vasodilatory response to reactive hyperemia significantly improved (4.2 ± 1.2% to 7.8 ± 3.5%, p = 0.0032). The increased vasodilatory response to reactive hyperemia by cilostazol was reduced after cessation of the drug (4.5 ± 1.5%). These findings suggest that cilostazol improves vascular endothelial dysfunction in smokers.
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  • Ikuo Inoue, Kenji Hayashi, Fumiharu Yagasaki, Koh-ichi Nakamura, Toshi ...
    Type: Original Articles
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 99-108
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Apoptosis in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) was prevented by transfection with the gene for the human full-length peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα), or acyl-coenzyme A synthetase (AcylCS) into HUVECs. In contrast, ligands/activators of PPARγ1 induced apoptosis by a cytochrome c-dependent mechanism in HUVECs transfected with human full-length PPARγ1, but not in hepatocytes. Co-trasfection of PPARγ1 and PPARα protected the HUVEC apoptosis. The results suggest that the apoptosis of endothelial cells may be mediated by genes of PPARγ1 and PPARα .
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  • Hideo Suzuki, Hideyuki Kobayashi, Fumiyasu Sato, Yoshikazu Yonemitsu, ...
    Type: Original Articles
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 109-116
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study investigated the effect of pitavastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A ( HMG-CoA ) reductase inhibitor with strong cholesterol-lowering activity, on the composition of atherosclerotic plaque. Pitavastatin ( 0.5mg/kg ) was administered to Watanabe heritable hyperlipidemic ( WHHL ) rabbits for 16 weeks, with the result that plasma total cholesterol ( TC ), very low density lipoprotein ( VLDL )-C, intermediate density lipoprotein ( IDL )-C and low density lipoprotein ( LDL )-C decreased by 28.6, 60.0, 42.3 and 21.7%, respectively. In the aorta, pitavastatin reduced the area of the lesion by 38.6%. In the pitavastatin group, the macrophage-positive area in the aortic plaque was reduced by 39.4%, and the areas occupied by collagen and a-smooth muscle actin ( α -SMA )-positive area increased by 66.4 and 91.7%, respectively. In the aortic arch, pitavastatin increased the average thickness of α-SMA in the plaque by 96.7% and reduced the vulnerability index by 76.0%. Furthermore, pitavastatin reduced the positive areas of monocyte chemoattractant protein ( MCP )-1, matrix metalloproteinase ( MMP )-3 and MMP-9 by 39.1, 40.6 and 52.3%, respectively. These results indicated that pitavastatin had an excellent lipid-lowering effect in WHHL rabbits, suppressing the progression of atherosclerosis and stabilizing atherosclerotic plaque.
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  • Masumi Kamiyama, Kazunori Utsunomiya, Kanta Taniguchi, Tamotsu Yokota, ...
    Type: Original Articles
    2003 Volume 10 Issue 2 Pages 117-123
    Published: 2003
    Released: February 13, 2004
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to identify small G protein (s) which contributes to the proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), we examined the effect of an HMG-CoA reductase inhibitor (cerivastatin), a farnesyltransferase inhibitor (FTI-277), a geranyl geranyl transferase inhibitor (GGTI-286) and a Rho kinase inhibitor (Y-27632) on the proliferation of cultured rat VSMCs stimulated with 20ng/ml platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB. Cerivastatin and GGTI-286, but not FTI-277, suppressed the PDGF-BB-induced activation of extracellular signal related kinase (ERK1/2). The inhibitory effect of cerivastatin on the PDGF-BB-induced activation of ERK1/2 was fully recovered by the addition of geranylgeranyl pyrophosphate (GGPP), but not farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Cerivastatin and GGTI-286, but not FTI-277, suppressed the PDGF-BB-induced [3H] thymidine incorporation and activation of ornitine decarboxylase (ODC), both of which were fully recovered by the addition of GGPP, but not FPP. These data indicate that the PDGF-BB-induced activation of ERK1/2 and proliferation of VSMCs depend upon geranylgeranylated small G protein. Immunoblotting analysis revealed the upregulation of Rho A protein in the membrane fractions of VSMCs stimulated by PDGF-BB. Furthermore, Y-27632 suppressed the PDGF-BB-induced activation of ERK1/2 and proliferation of VSMCs. On the basis of these data, we conclude that PDGF-BB stimulates the proliferation of VSMCs via the activation of Rho A. Rho kinase plays an important role in this process as an effector of Rho A.
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