Journal of the Japan Society of Erosion Control Engineering
Online ISSN : 2187-4654
Print ISSN : 0286-8385
ISSN-L : 0286-8385
Volume 52 , Issue 4
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • Munehiro MATSUI
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 1-3
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Makie MATSUMOTO, Etsuro SHIMOKAWA, Takashi JITOUSONO, Kenji KUROGI
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 4-12
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    This study aims to examine a natural revegetation process with relation to the topsoil reformation following a shallow landslide disturbance and effective indicators for predicting the potential sites of the shallow landslide on Shirasu (Ito pyroclastic flow deposits) steep slopes in Kagoshima City, southern Kyushu, Japan. Castanopsis cuspidata var. sieboldii took the place of Pinus thunbergii at a transitional stage around 50-55 years after landsliding and was a dominant at a climax stage over 80 years after landsliding. The topsoil reformation on the landslide scar was making gradually progress as time goes on, reached about 40cm thick over 80 years after landsliding. It could be concluded that frequency of evergreen broadleaved trees and Castanopsis cuspidata var. sieboldii to the total number of tree plants were effective indicators for predicting potential sites of the shallow landslide.
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  • Akitsu KIMOTO, Taro UCHIDA, Takahisa MIZUYAMA, Changhua LI
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 13-18
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to evaluate the sediment yield in devastated mountains, rainfall, runoff and sediment yield have been measured in the devastated small basins of the southern part of China. The purpose of this study is to examine the control factors involved in sediment discharge in such devastated mountains. We estimated the sediment yield by calculation using models, and compared the calculated results with actual measured results. It became clear that one of important control factors for sediment discharge is not the transport capacity, but rather the sediment detachment in the basin.
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  • Nobutomo OSANAI, Guogiang OU
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 19-25
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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  • Kiyoo IDO, Kazuyuki SATO, Takahisa MIZUYAMA
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 26-32
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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    The effect of sabo facilities such as sabo dams, groundsels and slit sabo dams on the control of sediment discharge rates was evaluated using a computer aided sediment routing method. The Ura River, a branch of the Hime River System was taken as an example. The ordinary closed type sabo dams and slit type sabo dams were examined. The results of the calculations proved that the higher slit type sabo dams have a greater effect. A small number of ordinary closed type sabo dams were not very effective in controlling the sediment discharge rate as was anticipated, while the rest of the dams, however, did control sediment discharge even more than was expected. The slit type sabo dams were not effective at all. Because the height of the dams are all as little as 10 meters and the riverbed gradients are all as slight as 1/10. The sabo dams installed at the lower reaches reduced more sediment discharge than that of the sabo dams installed at the upper reaches.
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  • Masanori KANEKO, Noriyuki MINAMI, Hideaki OTSUZUKI
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 33-38
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A large number of mudflows and slope failures occurred due to heavy rain, which killed twenty-four people and injured fourteen in Hiroshima Prefecture on June 29, 1999. We visited the places where were damaged by these disasters and interviewed residents, particularly about the types of behavior prior to the occurrence of mudflow. The following results were obtained :
    1) As it rained more heavily and the water levels of small streams increased, residents felt uneasy about the overflow of the streams rather than expecting the possibility of an occurrence of mudflow.
    2) As the rain continued, most of the residents began finding themselves in dangerous situations just before the occurrence of the mudflow and hurried to safer places within their walking range. A few residents, however, who were not able to escape to safer places or were on their way, experienced serious danger.
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  • Takahisa MIZUYAMA, Yukinori OUGI, Akira ODA
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 39-41
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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  • Shuji NISHIKAWA, Hiroshi WADA, Hidetoshi TAJIMA, Takahisa MIZUYAMA, Ak ...
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 42-44
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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  • Kimio INOUE
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 45-54
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Shimabara-Shigatusaku Earthquake occurred on 21 May 1792 (1 April, the 4th year of Kansei, Lunar calender of Japan) in the Unzen volcanic area in western Kyushu, during the last stage of volcanic activity of Mt. Fugen in the period between the end of 1791 and the beginning of 1792. A gigantic landslide was induced by the earthquake on the eastern slope of the Mayu-Yams lava dome of the Unzen volcanic area. Huge amount of soil and rocks rushed into the Ariake Bay generating a big tsunami. The tsunami hit both sides of the bay, and claimed the lives of approximately 15, 000 persons. This is the worst disaster in the history of volcanic hazards in Japan, called as “the Shimabara Catastrophe”.
    Two old maps concerning the Shimabara Catastrophe prepared in the Tokugawa Era were discovered. One is a predisaster map titled as “Daisin-zu in Kansei 4”, as shown in Fig. 3 and the other one is a post-disaster map titled as “Big map of the Shimabara Catastrophe”, as shown in Fig. 4. Fig. 3 was prepared after flow down of the Shinyake lava flow occurred 25 March-21 April and another earthquake lasted for 2 days period of 21-22 April. Fig. 4 was prepared after Shimabara-Shigatusaku Earthquake and the Shimabara Catastrophe on 21 May.
    It is supposed that these two maps were drawn exactly from the same place in the Shimabara Castle area. Fig. 5 is bird's-eye view of Mt. Mayu-Yama from the Shimabara Castle based on Digital National Land Information 1996. Photo. 1 is a picture of Mt. Mayu-Yama taken from the Shimabara Castle. These maps and photo show almost same objects in different times.
    In the center of the post-disaster map as shown in Fig. 4, approximately 50 hummocky debris mounds are shown and on the left hand side which is southern part of the debris mounds, debris flow is depicted. Thus, the map shows that Mayu-Yama was broken down by two different forms of collapse, which caused the debris mounds and the debris flows. According to the map, the author assumes that these movements might not occurre at the same time.
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  • Makoto SASAKI
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 55-59
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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  • Satoshi KATSUKI
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 60-63
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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  • Yasumasa KOGA
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 64-68_2
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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  • Takao YAMAKOSHI, Yoshikazu SHIMIZU, Noriyuki MINAMI
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 73-74_2
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
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  • Satoshi TSUCHIYA
    1999 Volume 52 Issue 4 Pages 75-75_2
    Published: November 15, 1999
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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