The Journal of the Society for Art and Science
Online ISSN : 1347-2267
ISSN-L : 1347-2267
Volume 11, Issue 3
Displaying 1-6 of 6 articles from this issue
Papers for Special Issues "NICOGRAPH"
  • Soh Masuko, Hroyuki Kamo, Hiroshi Abe, Takamasa Takenaka
    Article type: research-article
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 37-46
    Published: September 30, 2012
    Released on J-STAGE: April 01, 2023
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    With the increase of internet users, the e-commerce market for consumers has been growing year after year, but on the other hand, it is pointed out that many of the internet consumers are hesitating to do shopping at internet shops. In this paper, we propose a method for visualizing real-time customer purchase information of a product sold in an online shopping service. We have visualized the customer purchase information by representing the information as characteristics of human like icon. As a result of applying the method to an actual online shop, there were significant increases in CTR and CVR, which indicated that this could improve user's online shopping experience.
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  • Tsutomu Kinoshita, Yuta Muraki, Katsutsugu Matsuyama, Kouichi Konno
    Article type: research-article
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 47-58
    Published: September 30, 2012
    Released on J-STAGE: April 01, 2023
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    In many cases, earthenware is broken and excavated from ruins. Generally, all processes from the classification of earthenware to assembly and the restoration are often done by the hand work. At this time, It is necessary manually to bury a lack part by using gypsum etc. In this paper, we propose the method for expressing the surface shape by using the shape around lack part where earthenware is missed. In our method, first of all, the patterns on the surface of earthenware is removed by using the low-pass filter. After that, the surface which is filled the hole is generated from the pattern removed surface. Surface fitting method is employed to generatethe hole filling surface. Finally, the trimmed surface is composed by generating the boundary of the hole, and using the boundary and the fitting surface.
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  • Kenneth Chan, Koji Mikami, Kunio Kondo
    Article type: research-article
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 59-68
    Published: September 30, 2012
    Released on J-STAGE: April 01, 2023
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Traditional single player first person shooter (FPS) games adopt a generally linear level design. Players are not given much choice as to where to go next, and thus it is paramount that the designer is able to keep the player interested throughout the whole level. It is widely accepted that in order to keep the player's interest, it is important to offer the player a varied gaming experience by presenting high interest and low interest encounters in an alternating fashion. However, while there are general theories and rules of thumb as to how this can be done, there is little formal knowledge about how exactly high or low interest levels can be achieved. Our goal is to create a better understanding on how to design encounters that affect interest levels in linear FPS games. Specifically, how exactly a player's interest levels can be raised intentionally. To accomplish this, we developed a method for measuring and comparing player interest levels based on electroencephalogram (EEG) data measured using a “Neurosky Mindset” unit, which is a commercially available EEG device. We measured player EEG data for the first 4 levels of the FPS game “Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2” and calculated player interest levels for the entire length of gameplay. By referring to recorded gameplay videos, we were able to associate each increase in interest levels for each player to a specific point in game. From this data, we found and isolated points in each level where most players showed a rise in interest levels, and discovered that certain patterns existed between these situations. These findings led to another study where we further analyzed these situations and found out what factors caused most players to show a rise in interest levels. We were able to divide these factors into 6 different categories called Triggers: “Anticipation”, “Concentration”, “Surprise”, “Frustration”, “Overwhelm” and “Fear”. As these triggers represent mutually exclusive elements that affect a player's interest levels, we found that in most situations where many test subjects showed a rise in interest levels, more than one trigger is present, a phenomenon we call Stacking. While our study is still ongoing, we believe that by using these triggers as guidelines, game designers will be able to intentionally plan and control the player's interest level for FPS games with a certain level of guarantee.
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Papers
  • Yusuke Iwase, Reiji Suzuki, Takuya Arita
    Article type: research-article
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 69-78
    Published: September 30, 2012
    Released on J-STAGE: April 01, 2023
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Complex systems such as organisms and social systems exhibit macro-level behavior that is self-organized by micro interactions between their components. However, the macro-level behavior could be also changed by interactions with the external environment including other self-organizing systems. This study aims at understanding and applications of self-organizing systems that interact with external environments at the macro level. We propose a system that allows interaction between cellular automata (CAs) and humans through a touch panel, in which users can customize the rules of CAs by using interactive evolutionary computation. The system allows users for macro-level interactions with play features. These macro-level interactions would be useful for understanding self-organizing behaviors and applications in art, education.
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  • Janyl Tynystanova, Norishige Chiba
    Article type: research-article
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 79-91
    Published: September 30, 2012
    Released on J-STAGE: April 01, 2023
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Supplementary material
    In this paper we propose an efficient new method for modeling the natural motion of cloth flapping based on a stochastic method for wind simulation and a P-type Fourier descriptor. Many have studied cloth behavior through modeling and animation, but only a few studies have combined a stochastic method for wind generation with the physical properties of cloth motion. However, the integration of artificial forces may alter the flapping and fluttering motion. We do not use physical simulation and forces; instead we apply the generated wind value directly to the cloth motion. We apply the 1/ fβ noise in the angles that define the curvature of fibers, using a Fourier descriptor because of its smoothing properties. This allows us to create a natural cloth shape. Since this approach does not require physical simulation based on equations describing the motion, we can easily tune the implementation using parameters that control the cloth motion in real time. Moreover, we propose a few simple techniques to improve the visual realism of fluttering, the appearance of swirling, and wrinkle effects.
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  • Gantulga TSEDENDORJ, Norishige CHIBA
    Article type: research-article
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 3 Pages 92-101
    Published: September 30, 2012
    Released on J-STAGE: April 01, 2023
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS
    Supplementary material
    We present a simple and efficient method for animating different types of water flows with emphasis on a surging wave. The method employs a stochastic approach of extending 2D simulation data into 3D animation space. For the reality of a wave motion along the direction of its dominant propagation, we utilize a physically-based, particle simulation at the pre-processing step and extract surface and splash particles only. At the animation step, these 2D surface frames are stochastically sampled along the transverse direction in the animation time and slice (called time-slice) domain with the aid of a user-defined noise function. For the surface reconstruction in 3D, we use a geometrical technique with a smoothing filter in order to remedy undesired 2D artifacts that result from the slice sampling. In conjunction with appropriate supplements, we apply our method to other types of water flows, indicating further interesting applications of a ripple wave and a whirlpool rotation.
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