Rinsho Shinkeigaku
Online ISSN : 1882-0654
Print ISSN : 0009-918X
ISSN-L : 0009-918X
Volume 56 , Issue 9
Showing 1-13 articles out of 13 articles from the selected issue
Case Reports
  • Shintaro Hayashi, Shun Nagamine, Kouki Makioka, Susumu Kusunoki, Koich ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 593-599
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 31, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    A 71-year-old woman with chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) with IgA-λ monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) showed the acute development of tetraplegia, respiratory failure, and a marked fluctuation of the blood pressure. Intravenous (IV) high-dose steroid therapy (methylprednisolone: 1 g/day × 3 days), followed by oral prednisolone (PSL) (40 mg/day), and IV immunoglobulin (IVIg, 0.4 g/kg/day × 5 days) administrations resulted in the amelioration of these symptoms. However, they soon relapsed, which eventually led to complete tetraplegia and the need for mechanical ventilation. At this time, serum components of IgA-λ and IgM-λ were biclonally positive. Seven courses of plasma exchange and the alternative administration of dexamethasone (12 mg/day) and methtorexate (15 mg/week) were conducted, but with no significant improvement. Nine months after admission, she showed totally-locked in syndrome. Cryo-preserved serum obtained at this time showed high titers of IgM class antibodies against ganglioside (GD3 +++, GT1a ++++, GT1b ++, GQ1b +++, and GD1b +++), which had been negative on admission. Biopsy of the left sural nerve showed moderate reductions of large and small myelinated fibers with no inflammation, no depositions of amyloid, IgG, IgA, or IgM, and teased fiber findings revealed neither myelin ovoids nor segmental demyelination. Alternatively, melphalan at 5 mg and PSL at 32 mg were administered, with no amelioration, while serum IgA-λ monoclonal protein diminished, and IgM-λ M protein positivity was continuously observed. She frequently developed sepsis; therefore, we could no longer continue any immunosupressive therapies, but monthly IVIg administrations were given. Twelve months after admission, her neurological symptoms gradually improved and she was weaned off of mechanical ventilation. Eighteen months after admission, her muscle strength corresponded to 2 on manual muscle testing, and wheelchair transfer became possible. To the best of our knowledge, the present case is the first report of CIDP with MGUS showing an alternating immunoglobulin class.

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  • Chiharu Yasuda, Takanobu Takei, Takenori Uozumi, Tomoko Toyota, Tomoak ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 600-604
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Parkinsonism and dystonia are both disorders of the extrapyramidal motor system, and some patients exhibit a complex of the two symptoms. Although several reports have referred to the coexistence of these disorders as parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, in the majority of cases, dystonia appeared after parkinsonism. DAT-scan is useful for the early diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) and other types of parkinsonism such as dementia with Lewy bodies. This case report describes a 67-year old woman diagnosed with axial dystonia without parkinsonism 6 years previously, which had worsened despite treatment with Botulinum toxin injections, and hindered the patient’s gait. The patient visited the hospital because of gait disturbances and DAT-scan showed a levodopa transducer decrease in the putamen. A few weeks later, she was re-admitted to hospital and exhibited Parkinsonism. Levodopa improved the gait disturbances but axial dystonia was unchanged, and a clinical diagnosis of PD was made. In the authors’ opinion, this was a rare case of parkinsonian disorders with dystonia, characterized by the development of PD after dystonia. DAT-scan may be helpful for the diagnosis of patients with parkinsonian disorders with dystonia.

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  • Yukio Mizuno, Madoka Mori-Yoshimura, Tomoko Okamoto, Yasushi Oya, Ichi ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 605-611
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 31, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Sporadic late onset nemaline myopathy (SLONM) associated with monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) is an adult onset myopathy with poor clinical outcomes, requiring high-dose intravenous melphalan with autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (HDM-SCT). Here we report two cases of SLONM associated with MGUS in which improvements were achieved only with immunotherapy. A 39-year-old woman had a two-year history of dropped head syndrome and progressive proximal weakness. On admission, she was able to walk with assistance and had lordosis with camptocormia. Combination therapy with plasmapheresis and intravenous immunoglobulin in addition to intravenous methylprednisolone pulse therapy ameliorated camptocormia and proximal weakness after one year. A 51-year-old man had difficulty in raising his arms and required walking assistance prior to visiting our hospital. He had proximal weakness and atrophy, winged scapulae, and gait disturbance. After combination immunotherapy, no progression was observed for 13 years. In both cases, patients did not desire to undergo HDM-SCT, and IgG kappa monoclonal protein was positive, of which the levels were normalized after immunotherapy. Combination immunotherapy can be a possible alternative to HDM-SCT in patients with SLONM. Both patients showed myogenic changes with abundant fibrillation, and needle EMG revealed positive sharp waves. Case 1 showed high signal intensities in MRI STIR/T2WI in muscles showing weakness. These findings are commonly observed in patients with myositis, suggesting that, without muscle biopsy, SLONM may be misdiagnosed as myositis. Muscle biopsy revealed scattered fibers with nemaline bodies without type 2B deficiency, which are important pathological findings that differentiate SLONM from congenital nemaline myopathy.

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  • Yukiko Suzuki, Yuichiro Inatomi, Toshiro Yonehara
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 612-616
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    A 47-year-old woman developed a headache and tinnitus in her right ear followed by sudden-onset left hemiparesis. She had no history of trauma or thrombophilia. Arteriography showed an occlusion of the superior sagittal sinus, and a stenosis of the right transverse sinus. She was treated with anticoagulants; thereafter her deficits and sinus thrombosis immediately improved. However, 7 months after the onset, she noticed tinnitus in her left ear. Arteriography showed a dural arteriovenous fistula extending from the left occipital artery to the left transverse and sigmoid sinus, but no recurrence of the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. After manual compression of the left occipital artery was initiated, the tinnitus and dural arteriovenous fistula did not worsen. A dural arteriovenous fistula may be detected in patients with cerebral venous sinus thrombosis during the chronic phase.

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  • Misako Kaido, Yoshihito Yuasa, Tameyoshi Yamamoto, Satoru Munakata, Na ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 617-621
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 06, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    We report the case of a patient who had developed multiple cranial nerve palsies in the course of possible paraneoplastic neurological syndrome (PNS) associated with gallbladder cancer. Twelve days prior to visiting our hospital, a 69-year-old man began experiencing neurological symptoms, beginning with diplopia and progressing to ptosis of the left palpebra and subsequent complete closure of the eye within 8 days. Results of the initial medical examination indicated paresis of left oculomotor (III) and abducens (VI) nerves. MRI of the brain revealed no focal lesion that could have resulted in compression of the affected nerves, while further examination ruled out diabetes mellitus, infection, vasculitis, and other systemic autoimmune diseases as potential causes. Gadolinium-enhanced MRI revealed high intensity located in the oculomotor nerves, and steroid pulse therapy was performed based on the assumption of inflammatory diseases. Although slight improvement was observed with respect to the left extraocular paresis, subsequent emergence of bilateral facial nerve (VII) palsy, right abducens nerve palsy, and right oculomotor nerve palsy occurred in succession. PET/CT performed under suspicion of PNS, confirmed the presence of gallbladder cancer. Surgical extirpation of the cancer occurred 3 months following the appearance of left oculomotor paralysis, after which the patient underwent postoperative chemotherapy. All cranial nerve palsies resolved within 2 months after the operation, and both cancer and PNS have shown no recurrence for over 5 years. Pathological examination of the resected tumor revealed well-differentiated tubular adenocarcinoma showing some signs of epithelial-mesenchymal transition, typically an indicator of a poor prognosis. Nevertheless, lymph node metastasis did not progress beyond N2, and the cancer was completely removed by lymph node dissection. Therefore, the presence of multiple cranial palsies in this patient led to early detection of the asymptomatic gallbladder cancer and immediate administration of life-saving treatment.

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  • Fumi Kobayashi, Hidetaka Kato, Miki Suzuki, Ryosuke Usui, Minako Koike ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 622-626
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 31, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    A 23-year-old woman presented with disturbance of consciousness and seizure. Her blood pressure was remarkably high, and brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed high-intensity T2 signals in the bilateral basal ganglia, corpus callosum, cerebral white matter, and cortex. With the administration of angiotensin II receptor blocker, the symptoms and MRI findings improved, along with normalization of blood pressure, and a diagnosis of posterior reversible leukoencephalopathy syndrome (PRES) was made. Plasma renin activity was high, and the right kidney was severely atrophic. Results from renal and adrenal vein sampling revealed renal vascular hypertension derived from the right renal artery stenosis. The right kidney was then removed by laparoscopic nephrectomy. Pathological examination of the kidney confirmed the diagnosis of fibromuscular dysplasia (FMD). In juvenile-onset encephalitis/encephalopathy, PRES due to FMD should be included in the differential diagnosis.

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  • Tetsuya Abe, Kazuhiko Mishima, Akira Uchino, Atsushi Sasaki, Norio Tan ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 627-632
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 31, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    We report an 84-year-old woman with rheumatoid meningitis. She developed weakness in her muscles and became cognitively impaired. However, physical examination revealed no evidence of rheumatoid arthritis. Levels of anti-cyclic citrullinated peptide antibodies were elevated. Brain magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) showed hyperintense lesions in the frontotemporoparietal subarachnoid space on fluid attenuated inversion recovery (FLAIR) images. Leptomeningeal enhancement was also evident on gadolinium-enhanced T1-weighted images. We suspected rheumatoid meningitis. A brain biopsy was performed and methylprednisolone pulse therapy was started. Subsequently, her symptoms and MRI findings rapidly improved.

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Brief Clinical Notes
  • Kazuhiro Itaya, Manabu Inoue, Natsuko Iizuka, Yuki Shimizu, Nobuhiro Y ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 633-636
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 31, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Supplementary material

    A 17-year-old male with no medical history noticed weakness of his limbs with imbalance and subsequent finger tremors. Physical examination revealed features of polyneuropathy, including diffuse weakness, distal symmetrical numbness with impaired deep sensation and areflexia in all limbs. Postural tremor was present in fingers. Ataxia was apparent in both lower limbs, causing a wide-based gait with a positive Romberg sign. Cerebrospinal fluid contained elevated total protein without pleocytosis. A nerve conduction study disclosed demyelinating features with prolonged terminal latencies, slow velocities with delayed F-wave latencies, and prominent temporal dispersion. These findings led to diagnosis of typical chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy (CIDP) with notable feature of postural finger tremor and ataxia of unknown cause. These atypical features prompted us to examine neurofascin-155 (NF155) antibodies, which were positive. No significant improvement occurred after initial administration of intravenous immunoglobulin and subsequent plasma exchange. However, corticosteroids with intravenous pulse therapy followed by oral prednisolone significantly improved the symptoms. Patients with CIDP with anti-NF155 antibodies may have similar clinical features and constitute a CIDP subgroup. In such patients, corticosteroids may be more effective than intravenous immunoglobulin. Further studies are needed to define the features of this subgroup and determine effective therapy for CIDP.

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  • Ruka Nakata, Shunsuke Yoshimura, Masakatsu Motomura, Akira Tsujino, To ...
    2016 Volume 56 Issue 9 Pages 637-640
    Published: 2016
    Released: September 29, 2016
    [Advance publication] Released: August 31, 2016
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    IgG4-related disease is a systemic disease characterized by lesions with IgG4 positive plasma cell infiltration in the involved organs and a raised serum IgG4 level. We report a patient of 70-year-old male presented orbital inflammation of IgG4-related disease. The patient developed right eye pain, double vision, and reduced eye sight. MRI image revealed mild right ocular proptosis and swelling of right carvenous sinus, bilateral intraorbital extraocular muscles and right optic nerve. Right optic nerve showed ring-like enhancement. IgG4-related disease was suspected with increased serum IgG4 level of 355 mg/dl, mediastinal lymphadenopathy and prostate enlargement. Transbronchial lung biopsy and prostate needle biopsy were administered with negative results. The eye related symptoms resolved with time, but serum IgG4 continuously increased. IgG4-related disease was diagnosed by nasal mucosa biopsy, which showed IgG4 positive plasma cells within the inflammatory infiltrate. This report emphasizes the usefulness of nasal mucosa biopsy for the diagnosis of IgG4 related disease with lesions difficult to approach.

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