JOURNAL OF THE JAPAN WELDING SOCIETY
Online ISSN : 1883-7204
Print ISSN : 0021-4787
ISSN-L : 0021-4787
Volume 26 , Issue 12
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 730-734
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
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  • [in Japanese]
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 735-741
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 741
    Published: 1957
    Released: December 10, 2009
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  • K. Ando, T. Nakamura
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 742-746
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: December 10, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Under the same assumptions as Report I (Japanese W. J. 26 No. 9 p.558 1957), temperature variation along the plate thickness during the heating time are shown as equ. (20), (21), and we see that higher harmonics of Fourier series can be neglected compared to the fundamental. So the heat time constant can be expressed as equ. (22), (23), and the calculated values are shown in Table 2 in case of X0=1mm, assuming that θm is equal to the melting temperature θf of the material under question.
    For the cooling phenomena T10 of equ. (23) must be taken instead of T1. The temperature fluctuation due to a.c. heating can be calculated easily when we assume a=0, and the result is given as equ. (33) for steady state. Table 3 shows that the temperature varies 29% up and down the mean value in case of aluminium alloy of 1 mm thickness for f=50 _??_ if we take the contants shown in Table 1 of Report I.
    The critical current density, over which the temperature tends to infinity under the assumptions of Report I, is shown in Table 1.
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  • Y. Ishii
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 747-751
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In case of solid phase welding, it is necesary to heat the joining materials at last above recrystalization temperature of either one. And in the joining process, the pressure and surface tension of the materials are important factor to accelerate the joining. For these reasons, the materials which have high melting point could be solid-phase-welded during 30-60 seconds at a temperature little higher than their recrystalization temperature by use of the powder as medium.
    By the joining method mentioned above, tungsten, tungsten carbide, quartz and etc. were solid-phasewelded with each other by use of powder of appropriate materials as medium, and its strength was close to that of the materials. when this joining method was applied to common metals, the results were obtained as indicated in the following examples, the joining strength, when Cr-steel was welded by use of Co-powder as medium, was about 65kg/mm2 and that, when Cr-steel welded by Ni-powder, was about 50kg/mm2.
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  • H. Sekiguchi, M. Inagaki, M. Sato
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 752-757
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
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    The shape of base plate used for welding test was changed in thickness, width and length independently. A single bead was deposited on the center-line of each plate over wholelength with the covered electrode under uniform conditions.
    The thickness influences most severly on the cooling curve of heat-affected zone near the fusion line. The width has also certain effect on the curve, but the length scarcely concerns. The cooling curves are similar, when the plate-size is 11mm in thickness and is larger than 150mm in width. The maximum hardness in the heat-affected zone also inclines to become constant over this size.
    In this investigation, the microstructure in the heat-affected zone was classified into three kinds; the structure which contains primary ferrite, the intermediate transformation structure (Zwischenstufengefuge) and the structure which contains martensite among the intermediate transformation structure.
    The maximum hardness in the heat-affected zone depends on the cooling time from A3 point to any constant temperature between 400 and550°C as shown in Fig. 8, 9 and 10.
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  • M. Watanabe, K. Kamachi, Y. Mukai, T. Okada
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 758-763
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: December 10, 2009
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    The plastic behaviour of iron crystals fractured at low temperature have been observed using X-ray as an aid of consideration about "Transition Temperature".
    Iron single crystals were made by strain-recrystallization method and Laue photographs were taken before and after the crystals were fractured at low temperature from -180°C to room temperature.
    The macroscopic morphology of fractured part of the specimen are shear type and shrink locally, and the direction of incident X-ray beam for Laue photogruphs were normal and parallel to the edge of sheared plane.
    The Laue photographs from one shows obvious Central streeks following Debye ring from (110). The latter produces severely deformed spots which have fine structures and Debye ring as well as former. The Debye ring have assymmetlic intense accumulation.
    The Laue photographs taken from another direction show strange and fine streaks as photo. IV (a)-(c).
    We report here the Consideration from these characteristic Laue photographs.
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  • K. Ishizaki, M. Uemura
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 764-770
    Published: December 25, 1957
    Released: December 10, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Harness, structure, residual stress and tensile strength at high temperature were tested of preheated or post-heated weld metals using four kinds of martensitic and two kinds of austenitic hard facing electrodes. And abrasion resistance and crack sensitivity were also examined of merchant bar roll caliber welded with these electrodes.
    The following are the results obtained:-
    1. It seems that the wear resistance of hot roll caliber has mainly a correlation with hot tensile strength of the material, and as to the wear resistance the austenitic steel is the best, and of the martensitic steel the higher the carbon content is, the better.
    2. For martensitic steel the residual stress can fairly be decreased by preheating at 300°C and post-heated at 500°C. And insufficient annealing may result in cracks or break of rolls. For austenitic steel, preheating and post-heating have small effects, and there is a danger of embrittling rolls by carbide precipitation during annealing.
    3. Hardness and wear resistance of martensitic steel is influenced to no small degrees by preheating temperature, while it is easy to get uniform hardness for austenitic steel.
    4. Austenitic steel is liable to cause severe heat checking cracks.
    5. Expected saving of rolling cost cannot be attained by manual arc welding due to the high labor cost, and for this purpose mechanical welding is preferred for economy.
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 770g
    Published: 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 770b
    Published: 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 770c
    Published: 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 770d
    Published: 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 770e
    Published: 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 770f
    Published: 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 12 Pages 770a
    Published: 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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