JOURNAL OF THE JAPAN WELDING SOCIETY
Online ISSN : 1883-7204
Print ISSN : 0021-4787
ISSN-L : 0021-4787
Volume 26 , Issue 5
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • H. Kihara, H. Suzuki, H. Tamura, T. Oda, K. Miyano, K. Tazima
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 296-305
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    An extensive investigation was performed of the effects of nickel and chromium contents on weldability of high tensile manganese-silicon steels, forteen experimental and four commertial, which contained nickel or chromium less than 1%. The present paper, the third part, describes the results of the following tests, namely, slit-type cracking, CTS cracking, Gas cut bend, and Fillet-weld break tests. From the results of those tests, the following conclusions have been obtained;
    1. The degrees of cracking in the slit-type cracking test were not affected with increase of nickel up to about 0.9%, while increased greatly when chromium exceeded about 0.5% of content.
    2. In the CTS test specimens, distinct underbead cracks were observed frequently on steels which contained over 0.49% of chromium. However, the degrees of cracking in CTS test were not always related to that of slit-type cracking test, since many micro-cracks due to banded inclusions occured in the direction of rolling especially in the CTS test specimens. Generally, CTS cracking test appeared to be less sensitive than slit-type cracking test.
    3. Bending ductility of the gas cut bend test specimens was not almost affected by variation in nickel or chromium content.
    4. The degrees of pull out fracture in fillet-weld bereak test increased more with increase of nickel content than that of chromium.
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  • H. Suzuki, H. Tamura, Y. Kawana, R. Hasiguchi
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 305-313
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A simplified weld maximum hardness test with a taper bar specimen was introduced using a reproducing apparatus of weld thermal cycles. The specimen, 14mm in diameter and 150mm in length, was heated with a heavy current until the smallest section of the specimen melted away, and then the specimen was cooled in a still air. The dimentions of the taper bar specimens was selected so that the heating and cooling cycles at various positions along the specimen axis might be simulated closely with those in the heat affected zone of a standard bead weld.
    From the results of the simplified weld maximum hardness test made on six structural steels, the hardness and microstructures produces on the taper bar specimens agreed well with those obtained in welded specimens, However, the disagreement in hardnesses between the weld and the taper bar specimens in those few steels was proved to be due to the difference of the holding time at the peak value of heat treating temperature.
    Thus. the simplified tests was found to be effective to estimate the weld maximum hardness of steels, without requiring a large size of weld hardness test specimen.
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  • S. Morita, K. Ishizaki, S. Goda
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 313-320
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    As has been stated in the 1st report, for a high tensile structural steel with tensile strength over 60kg/mm2, the Si+Mn+V+Ti type i.e. the so-called Vanity type shows better weldability. However, as it has not been examined through satisfactory weldability tests, the final type of steel could not be established. In this report, with the object of improving Vanity type, the Vanity+Ni+Cr, the Vanity+Ni+Mo and the Vanity+Ni+Cr+Mo types were studied for as rolled and normalized conditions by various kinds of mechanical and weldability tests. The results obtained are as follows :
    1. For as rolled condition, all kinds of steels show too high tensile strength, but good elongation and weldability are not warranted.
    2. As for normalizing materiale, elongation is improved, but tensile strength becomes generally below 60kg/mm2. The Vanity+Ni+Cr+Mo type is comparatively better and also recommended in point of weldability.
    3. Large content of Cr seems to have bad effect on crack sensitivity of the material.
    4. From the view-point of hardenability of the material it is recommended that the Dearden and O'Neill's equivalent carbon should be below 0.45.
    5. On Kommerel test of crack is quaranteed by the I.I.W. maximum hardness below 350Hv and no breaking at the bending angle of 120 degree is also guaranteed unless the I. I. W. maximum hardness plus the hardness of parent metal exceeds 490Hv.
    6. On kinzel test of normarized materials, larger lateral contraction below the notch is guaranteed by the I.I.W. maximum hardness below 350Hv.
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  • S. Morita, S. Goda
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 320-328
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The standard V-notch Charpy, Tipper and Van der Veen tests were performed, using the plates of various thickness of semikilled and killed steels in order to study the correlations among the various transition temperatures and the advantages and disadvantages of the tests. The results obtained are as follows :
    1. As the criterion to derive a fracture transition temperature, the shear percentage of the fractured surface of a specimen is most reliable.
    2. It is difficult to derive the ductility transition temperature from either Van der Veen or Tipper tests if they are carried out at temperatures higher than -60°C, so far as the materials have not much higher transition temperature.
    3. The steepnesses of the transition curves are almost equal in both Tipper and Van der Veen tests and smaller in Charpy test than in the others.
    4. The difference of the fracture transition temperatures of steels is most prominent by Van der Veen test and in the order of Tipper and Charpy tests.
    5. Charpy specimen is not as plate thickness as Tipper and Van der Veen specimens, but Charpy results can be correlated with Tipper and Van der Veen results.
    6. Generally speaking, the transition temperatures drop with decreasing equivalent carbon and with increasing Mn/C among the same grade of steels.
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  • K. Kawata, Z. Tuzi, K. Yokota
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 329-332
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The standard V-notch Charpy, Tipper and Van der Veen tests were performed, using the plates of various thickness of semikilled and killed steels in order to study the correlations among the various transition temperatures and the advantages and disadvantages of the tests. The results obtained are as follows :
    1. As the criterion to derive a fracture transition temperature, the shear percentage of the fractured surface of a specimen is most reliable.
    2. It is difficult to derive the ductility transition temperature from either Van der Veen or Tipper tests if they are carried out at temperatures higher than -60°C, so far as the materials have not much higher transition temperature.
    3. The steepnesses of the transition curves are almost equal in both Tipper and Van der Veen tests and smaller in Charpy test than in the others.
    4. The difference of the fracture transition temperatures of steels is most prominent by Van der Veen test and in the order of Tipper and Charpy tests.
    5. Charpy specimen is not as plate thickness as Tipper and Van der Veen specimens, but Charpy results can be correlated with Tipper and Van der Veen results.
    6. Generally speaking, the transition temperatures drop with decreasing equivalent carbon and with increasing Mn/C among the same grade of steels.
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  • T. Sato
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 333-335
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We measured theamal distributions of thin disks when heat sources moved around center hole, shown in Fig. 1. Main results we obtained were following: (1) variations of temperatures with time at some points in these desks, for example, shown in Fig. 3, 4 and 5 ; (2) maps of thermal distributions, for example, shown in Fig. 6, 7, 8; (3) thermal distribution after heat sources stopped, for example, shown in Fig. 9, 10, 11 ; (4) temperatures as moving of heat sources at points of same ψ's with heat sources and larger γ's for example, shown in' Fig. 12, 13, 14.
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  • [in Japanese]
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 336-342
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 343
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1957 Volume 26 Issue 5 Pages 344-349
    Published: May 25, 1957
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Download PDF (462K)
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