JOURNAL OF THE JAPAN WELDING SOCIETY
Online ISSN : 1883-7204
Print ISSN : 0021-4787
ISSN-L : 0021-4787
Volume 28 , Issue 1
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 4-10
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 11-15
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • A. Uchida
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 16-21
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: November 17, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the welding experiment of T-fillet weld of 5mm thick aluminum plates, the penetrations, deformations and leg lengths were plotted with I/√v or √I/v as parameters in abscissas. In order to obtain the most reasonable welding schedule we must consider it under the defining factors and limits shown in Fig. 9. In our case, using 1/16″∅ electrode wire, the comparatively high current range (I=240-280A, v=70-110 cm/min, I/√v=0.20-0.22×103 A/(cm/sec)1/2, I=4.5-5.5mm) is considered preferable.
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  • H. Sakaki
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 22-24
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: December 10, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Chromium is a weak deoxidizer. In this report chromium have been used as single deoxidizer in the straight lime basic type electrodes. The weld metals have been attained by usual hand arc welding. Inclusions of the weld metals was extracted by carbon evaporated replica. Thus extracted inclusions were investigated by the electron microscope. The deoxidation products was proved to be chromite spinel. (FeO.Cr2O3) And its size are usually larger than several microns. Chromite inclusions have beautiful angular shaped type.
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  • M. Inagaki
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 25-31
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: July 14, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The experimental results obtained in case of the manual arc welding process with various type electrodes were summarized. The main factors that have influence upon cooling time near fusion line by welding were determined, and the relations between the main factors and the cooling time were concluded. Thd results of this researchare as follows :
    1. On carbon steels and high tensile steels or low alloy steels, the effect of the change of kinds of steels on cooling time from 800°C to 500°C is negligible small.
    2. In the case of bead deposited over whole length of a plate, the cooling time is not nearly influenced by the plate length. When the plate width exceed beyond about 150mm, the effect of the width, is also small. The plate of thickness over about 24mm is considered as a plate having infinite thickness, since the cooling time near fusion line of such plate does not change.
    3. A certain percentage of the heat generated by welding arc is given in the base plate. The percentage, that is, the thermal efficiency of arc energy is 0.75-0.83 in case of the manual arc welding process with covered electrodas.
    4. In case of depositing a long bend on a plate having width over 150mm, the main factors that have influence on the cooling time from 800°C to 500°C near fusion line are type of welding joint, plate thickness, are energy per unit bead length and preheating temperature.
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  • M. Inagaki
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 32-38
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: July 14, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In case of manual arc welding carbon steels or high tensile steels (low alloy steels) with covered electrodes, the cooling time (S sec.) from 800°C to 500°C near fusion line can be calculated by the following experimental formula,
    S=1.35(60EI/υ)1.5/β(600-T0)2{1+2/π tan-1(t-1.46/6)}
    where, E: arc voltage, Volt
    I: welding current, Amp.
    υ: proceeding rate of bead, cm/min.
    T0: preheating temperature in case of local heating by a flame, °C
    t: plate thickness, mm
    β: constant{
    1 for bead on a plate or final layer of butt joint,
    2 for T-fillet joint.
    Namely, the cooling time is determined mainly by arc energy per unit bead length J=60EI/υ, preheating temperature T0 and plate thickness t. The other variables, that is, kinds of steel and covered electrode, kind of welding current, AC or DC, and others, have only small effects on the cooling time and it is considered that deviations of measured points from the mean line decided by the above mentioned main factors are due to these small effects. The above formula is applicable at the center parts of a bead, when the bead length and plate width are comparatively larger.
    Next, according to the formula, a very convenient nomograph which is used practically was constructed.
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  • H. Sekiguchi, I. Masumoto, Y. Okada
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 39-44
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Several kinds of low-alloyed-steel electrodes were manufactured for trial. Good welds, with sufficient strength and ductility, joining two plates consisted of 60 kg/mm2-high-tensile steel were made by CO2-O2-arc welding with those electrodes. For example, strength of all weld metal ranges from 61 to 68 kg/mm2 elongation almost from 22 to 28% and impact value at -40°C from 3.6 to 5.4kg-m/cm2. All joint-tensile-test specimens were broken at base metal. And the results of side bend test for welded joint were recognized to be satisfactory.
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  • H. Sekiguchi, I. Masumoto
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 45-50
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A photoelectric tube type dew-pointmeter was set up to measure continuously aqueous vapor content of supplied gas. In this report, the authors described about the dew-pointmeter and showed some factors affecting the result measured by the apparatus. That is : An appearent dew point of flowing gas rises as a flow rate of gas increases. Kinds and condition of conduits affect an aqueous vapor content of supplied gas. And heating of flowing gas seems to elevate a dew point of it.
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  • T. Yoshida, W. Matsunaga, F. Kanatani, Y. Ono
    1959 Volume 28 Issue 1 Pages 51-56
    Published: January 25, 1959
    Released: June 12, 2009
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to investigate the weldability of mild steel coated with various paints, we made some experiments and obtained the following summaries ;
    1. In manual welding (low hydrogen type and ilmenite type) and semi-automatic welding (high iron powder type), several kinds of paints, including wash primer, iron oxide, zinc chromate and new paint (oleoresinous) whose film thickness not exceeding 2 mils, had little effect on the ease of arc start, arc stability, bead appearance and on the result of the radiographic inspection.
    2. Every paint film having thickness of not less than 5 mils had significant effect on the weldability of mild steel.
    3. Paint films were very harmful in submerged arc welding, irrespective of kinds of paints or film thickness.
    4. According to the Lehigh restraint tests, a 2-mil coat of wash primer and new paint (oleoresinous) had no effect but iron oxide and zinc chromate caused a slight rise of crack sensitivity.
    5. 2-mil coat of four kinds of above-mentioned paints has no detrimental effect on V-notch Charpy impact values of deposited metals, though wash primer lowered them a little.
    6. Viewing from what we stated above, we may say that wash primer, iron oxide, zinc chromate and new paint (oleoresinous) films, not exceeding a film thickness of 2 mils, have no detrimental effect on the weldability of mild steel in manual welding and semi-automatic welding.
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