JOURNAL OF THE JAPAN WELDING SOCIETY
Online ISSN : 1883-7204
Print ISSN : 0021-4787
ISSN-L : 0021-4787
Volume 30 , Issue 4
Showing 1-9 articles out of 9 articles from the selected issue
  • Kunihiko Satoh
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 212-218
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Toshio Yoshida
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 219-224
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Michio Inagaki
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 225-232
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Haruyoshi Suzuki, Michio Inagaki
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 233-241
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The Apparatuses for plotting the continuous cooling transformation diagram (CCT diagram) for welding, purpose using the high frequency type synthetic apparatus for reproducing weld thermal cycle are explaind. The CCT diagram obtained with these apparatuses is compared to it obtained with the traditional appratuses of silicon-carbide heating type for the same high tension steel.
    It is understood from the result that the CCT diagram for welding obtained with the high frequency type is most useful in the case that the cracking of the weld heat-affected zone is to be discussed with the CCT diagram in detail.
    For obtaining simply the critical cooling times, however, it is sufficient with silicon-carbide heating type.
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  • Hochiyo Sakaki
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 242-247
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Manganese gives beneficial effect to the weld metal in the presence of sulphur and phosphorus. Transition temperature based on the 15 ft-lbs energy definition was lowered by the addition of manganese at the same contents of sulphur up to 0.06%, and manganese also raised the critical phosphorus contents from which transition temperature showed marked increase.
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  • Tatsuo Kawasaki
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 248-253
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In this reports is tested the tensile shear-strength of the soft soldered joints, which are soldered on the condition, closed to the actual soldering condition, for short time at lower temperature.
    The test pieces are the double lap joints, which are made in the jig, (Fig. 1) and the test pieces are not suffered from the bending stress at the testing.
    It is generally thought that the strength of the soldered joints depend on the base metal, solder, soldering temperature, clearance, fluxes and soldering time, so the effects of these factors on the shear strength are studied.
    1) The joint failure do not occur in the intermetallic compound film, at the interface of base metal and solder, but always occur in the solder itself-cohesive failure.
    2) The tensile shear-strength of 70 : 30 tin-lead solder is greatest.
    3) The difference of the strength of joints, which are made with the different fluxes are not recognized.
    4) The strength of the brass joints are greater than the copper joints.
    5) The intermetallic compounds do not always fall off the strength of the soldered joints.
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  • Iwao Onishi, Masao Mizuno, Akira Okubo
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 254-259
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the previous report, authors defined the oxidize ability [O]/[S] of oxy-acetylene flame.
    In this report, continuously, the enprical formula between the oxidize degree of molten steel that is stated at the foot notes in Table 1 and oxidize power of oxy-acetylene flame was introduced as follow.
    oxidize degree {O}=A([O]/[S]·t1/4-B)
    where [O]/[S]·t1/4; oxidize power of oxy-acetylene flame
    t ; required time to melt per one gram of specimen, sec
    A and B ; the constants depending on the compositions of specimen
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  • Yutaka Kasamatsu
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 260-268
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    A physico-chemical study has been made on the chemical reaction between molten slag and metal in welding process by the arc welding electrode containing Fe-Mn in its coating as deoxidizer, and the following results were obtained.
    (1) Equilibrium index K'Mn{(% MnO)/[%Mn]⋅(%FeO)} is independent of slag-basicity, and its value is 3.08
    (2) Equilibrium index K'O{[%O]/(%FeO)} is also independent of slag-basicity, and its value is 0.00973.
    (3) Equilibrium index K'Si{[%Si]⋅(%FeO)/(%SiO2)} increases with decreasing slag-basicity, and the relation between K'Si and basicity BL is represented by the following equation;
    logK'Si=-0.4080BL-0.668
    (4) Activity coefficient of SiO2 in weld slag "ySiO2" increases with decreasing slag-basicity, where YSiO2→1 when slag-basicity BL→0, and it is a function of only BL, represented by the following equation ; log ySiO2=-0.408BL
    (5) Oxygen content in weld metal has not only relations with Si content in weld metal, but also slag-basicity and SiO2 content in weld slag, and the following equation was obtained for oxygen content in weld metal; log[%O]=-0.204BL-0.5log[%Si]+0.5log(%SiO2)-2.346
    (6) The expression of slag-basicity proposed by K. Mori is the most suitable for weld slag.
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  • Kan-ichi Suizu, Takeo Yasuada
    1961 Volume 30 Issue 4 Pages 269-278
    Published: April 25, 1961
    Released: August 05, 2011
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The weight of removed metal per millimeter of cut length was measured. Estimated from the results was the maximum amount of removed metal corresponding to the maximum thickness that can be cut under the referring cutting conditions and mean kerf width of both in the upper part and through the whole thickness of the cut was also estimated.
    Thus, the following main conclusions were derived :
    (1) The maximum amount of removed metal per liter of oxygen (hereafter will be referred to as the removal efficiency) is the largest at some specific pressure of oxygen. This pressure is nearly the same as that giving the highest cutting efficiency. Above the pressure the kerf width increases with the increasing pressue of oxygen.
    (2) The removal efficiency at the standard oxygen pressure increases with the increasing cutt-ing speed and is not apparently affected by the size of the tip. On the other hand, the kerf width is greatly affected by the tip size as well as by the cutting speed.
    (3) At the elevated steel temperatures the removal efficiency increases and the kerf width decreases.
    (4) The removal efficiency corresponding to the nominal consumption of oxygen as mentioned above is generally greater than that estimated by the chemical equation for iron-oxygen combustion, i. e.
    3Fe+2O2=Fe3O4
    For example, the removal efficiency at 800 mm/min. of cutting speed is two and half times that estimated by this chemical equation.
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