Bulletin of the Kitakyushu Museum of Natural History and Human History, Series A (Natural History)
Online ISSN : 2435-7545
Print ISSN : 1348-2653
Volume 13
Showing 1-2 articles out of 2 articles from the selected issue
Original Article
  • Tomoyuki Ohashi, Albert Prieto-Márquez, Yoshikazu Hasegawa, Yoshiki Ko ...
    Type: research-article
    2015 Volume 13 Pages 1-6
    Published: March 31, 2015
    Released: February 12, 2021
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT FREE ACCESS
    We describe isolated maxillary tooth and cervical vertebra from the Upper Cretaceous Ashizawa Formation of the Futaba Group in Fukushima Prefecture, Japan, which belong to a hadrosauroid dinosaur. The occurrence of these materials in the shallow-marine sediments suggests the habitat of this dinosaur in the coastal region, as discussed in previous studies.
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  • Tohru Manabe, Ryuichi Suda, Keiji Shimizu
    Type: research-article
    2015 Volume 13 Pages 7-18
    Published: March 31, 2015
    Released: February 12, 2021
    RESEARCH REPORT / TECHNICAL REPORT FREE ACCESS
    Factors affecting the decline in Potamogeton dentatus, which is a critically endangered submerged perennial plant, at an irrigation pond in Kitakyushu, the sole natural habitat of the species in Japan, were examined. The water flowing into the pond is very clear, and the physicochemical properties of the water of the pond are suitable for growth of the species, indicating that water quality is not the main factor in the drastic decline of the species at the pond. This special clarity of inflow to the pond may be why it has not been fully drained for several decades. Lack of drainage has made the quantity and quality of the bottom sediment unsuitable for growth of the species. In fact, bottom sediments with fine particles have accumulated and eutrophicated at the pond. Thus, the eutrophicated bottom sediments are likely to be the proximate factor causing the decline of P. dentatus at the pond. More broadly, socioeconomic changes in the 1960s and the special nature of the pond are the ultimate factors causing this decline.
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