Kyoto and Shiga Journal of Physical Education, Health and Sport Sciences
Online ISSN : 2435-8835
Print ISSN : 2187-7866
Volume 29 , Issue 2
Showing 1-14 articles out of 14 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese]
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 1
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese]
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 2
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese]
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 3
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese]
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 4
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese]
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 5-43
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 44-83
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 84-92
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese]
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 94-99
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japanese], [in Japane ...
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 100-117
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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  • Keiko MATSUNAGA, Hiroaki NINOMIYA, Jin NAGAZUMI
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 119-126
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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    The purpose this study is to clarify the characteristics and volunteer motivation structure of personal registration volunteers at the 2012 Kyoto Marathon. An inventory survey was carried out using the distribution and collection survey method ( delivery by hand ). Out of the 697 personal registration volunteers of the marathon to whom the survey was administered, 631 returned the survey ( a response rate of 90.5% ). The results of this study showed that Community Kyoto citizens accounted for 54.5% of the personal registration volunteers at the 2012 marathon. It was also revealed that there was a lack of experienced sports volunteers; 68.1% of New Kyoto citizen volunteers confirmed what was able to find sports volunteer of new voluntary enforcement with holding of Kyoto marathon 2012. In addition, the Kyoto citizen volunteer participant has the component ( Social Relationships, Ability Improvement, Community ( kyoto ) contribution, Sports ( marathon ), privilege ) of five participation motive, and, as for the volunteer participation motive about the participation in Community ( kyoto ) contribution the thing that was higher than volunteer participant outside Kyoto became clear for the multiple comparison of the factor score. An understanding of volunteer participation from the area' s inhabitants was necessitated from a human resource management point of view it was confirmed that the characteristics and motives of Kyoto citizens differed from those of outsiders and to plan the organization of sports volunteers.
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  • Jin NAGAZUMI, Keiko MATSUNAGA, Hiroaki NINOMIYA
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 127-136
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
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    The purpose of this study is to clarify about the influences which residents’ recognition the social impact toward Kyoto Marathon brings to intention of that event in the next year. Moreover, the mediation effect of the sport acceptance capability set up as parameter which specifies the both relation between residents’ recognition and intention of Kyoto Marathon in the next year. It implemented a mail‐back survey to the citizen of Kyoto who were 3,000 men and women aged 20 and over. They were chosen by the multistep extraction random sampling method. Then 658 effective samples acquired and rate of collections was 21.9%. The main results were as the following: (1) In the social impact which holding of the Kyoto Marathon brought to the area, it was extracted three factors; “the elevation of the Kyoto mind”, “the vigor of the area”, and an “environmental damage.” (2) In the Sport acceptance capability, three factors; “understanding of value”, “involvement to value”, and “ indifference” were found. (3) It became clear that intention toward Kyoto Marathon in the next year was accounted 40% or more with three factors of the social impact and the mediation effect of the sport acceptance capability. Based on the above results, the point of argument in this study was focused on evolution of the city marketing strategy and the strategic sport business accompanying holding of the sporting event.
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  • Hiroaki NINOMIYA, Keiko MATSUNAGA, Jin NAGAZUMI
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 137-144
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    The purpose of this research was to clarify runners’ sport consumer behavior using the analysis framework of running specialization. An extensive Internet investigation was conducted for runners in the 2012 Kyoto marathon; valid responses were obtained from 3,521 runners. The findings of this study indicate that runners with a high specialization level had high expenditures in the areas of domestic travel, accommodation, food and drink, facility admission and usage, and sports equipment.
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  • Daijiro ISOZAKI, Hiroyuki KOYAMA, Yasuo TANAKA, Nahoko OTSUKI, Makoto ...
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 145-147
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    This investigation was aimed at clarifying immediate effects of inclined and flat boards on the take-off motion of the high jump. Six male decathlon athletes were videotaped with three high‐speed cameras. Three kinds of boards were two tested, two upward‐inclination boards ( 3 and 5°) and a flat board (30mm high). The subjects performed pre and post jumps using their own techn-iques before and after use of each board to test their effects. There were no significant differences of velocity of the body and motion variables during the take‐off between pre and post jumps. However, in Subject N, desirable changes were observed in take‐off knee flexion and backward lean of the body after using 3° board. These indicated that there were no common immediate effects on take‐off motion of the high jump by the modified take‐off boards, but there have a possibility to be an effective training tool by using individually.
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  • -the case of knee injury’s patient-
    Masaru OOGIRI, Hisanori YUMINAGA, Katsuma YAMADA, Noriyuki KIDA
    2014 Volume 29 Issue 2 Pages 149-151
    Published: 2014
    Released: June 19, 2021
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    The purposes of this study were to elicit experimental knowledge from physical therapist, to elucidate motion analysis points related to gait of knee injury’s patient, to classify them into categories, and to investigate any commonality among theme. Semi‐structured interviews were conducted to five physical therapists. Each interview was requested to comment about the gait of a knee injury’s patient, which videotaped beforehand. The comments were recorded, dictated literally and divided into segments on the basis of meaning unit. Based on the properties of the various meaning units, they were gathered and classified into categories. As a result, we classified them into seven categories. It was shown that we divided common categories of the portion of injury and the therapy's portion and different categories of others irrespective of years of experience in physical therapy. It is considered that it may be occurred variant therapeutic effect to the different of ability to analyze a motion on physical therapists respectively.
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