Mathematical Linguistics
Online ISSN : 2433-0302
Print ISSN : 0453-4611
Volume 31 , Issue 7
Mathematicl Linguistics
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Paper B
  • Takuma Asaishi
    Type: Paper B
    2018 Volume 31 Issue 7 Pages 481-496
    Published: December 20, 2018
    Released: December 20, 2019
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    In this paper, the occurring process of important terms in junior-high and high school science textbooks has been analyzed. I calculated total information of text by calculating the difference between mutual information of term and paragraph and that computed on the text obtained by shuffling all term positions. I regard the degree of contribution of each term to the total information as the degree of importance in discourse structure of text. Then I extracted top 50% and 10% important terms, and describe how they appear in text. The primary results are as follows: (1) new important terms tend to appear in former part of the text, and they are repeated constantly as a whole. (2) Low-frequent terms appeared in former part of the text are gradually repeated, while the number of low-frequent terms are increased when all terms are considered.
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Note
  • Evidence from Three Longitudinal Surveys in Okazaki
    Shoichi Yokoyama, Yoshiyuki Asahi
    Type: Note
    2018 Volume 31 Issue 7 Pages 497-506
    Published: December 20, 2018
    Released: December 20, 2019
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    We analyzed longitudinal survey data on language change of honorifics use at home in Okazaki city of Aichi Prefecture, Japan. The Okazaki survey was carried out three times over 55 years, in 1953, 1972, and 2008, by National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics (NINJAL) and The Institute of Statistical Mathematics (ISM). A number of studies have demonstrated that a process of the language change follows a kind of S shape curve. Yokoyama, Asahi, and Sanada (2008) proposed a logistic regression model to predict language changes, representing as a multi-variate S shape curve. The model assumes two major variables; the birth year of the participants and the year of survey. We made our predictions of the 2008 data, based on logistic regression analysis of the 1953 and 1972 data. The result showed the differences between the prediction by the model and the observed data in middle or old (or high) age class. We discussed what factors determine the differences between the prediction and the observed data.
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Tutorial
  • Reliability Issue in Responses
    Tsunao Ogino
    Type: Tutorial
    2018 Volume 31 Issue 7 Pages 507-516
    Published: December 20, 2018
    Released: December 20, 2019
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    In 2016, I distributed and collected a self-completion questionnaire for which I obtained 346 responses. Four of the various questions in the questionnaire were multiple choice and the participants were required to select their answers from the fixed options provided for each question. Then, I tallied and analyzed the collected responses in terms of how the participants responded, and how those who did not answer in the prescribed way responded to other questions. Results showed that 7.7% of all questions were not answered according to the instructions given. In addition, the responses of 26 participants who did not follow the instructions or did not respond to two or more checking items tended to differ from the majority. Thus, it is inevitable that some participants do not follow instructions, and tallying their responses with the responses of other serious respondents could be problematic. Currently, we are facing a reliability issue in questionnaire survey responses, and this should be considered in the analysis of actual survey response data.
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Conference Report
  • at Wrocław University in Wrocław, Poland from July 5 to 8 2018
    Haruko Sanada
    Type: conference report
    2018 Volume 31 Issue 7 Pages 517-520
    Published: 2018
    Released: December 20, 2019
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    International Quantitative Linguistics Conference 2018 (QUALICO 2018) was held at Wrocław University in Wrocław, Poland from July 5th to 8th 2018. Two Keynote lectures were invited, and 48 papers as talks and 19 papers for a poster session were accepted. Participants come from EU counties, Russia, Canada, U.S.A., China, and Japan, etc. More papers focused on the applied topics like the translation,text mining, authorship attribution, comparative language studies, or study using corpora than classical or fundamental topics like linguistics laws. IQLA Council Business Meeting was also held and new board members were selected. The next conference is planned to be held in the National Institute for Japanese Language and Linguistics in Tokyo in September 2020.
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