Health and Behavior Sciences
Online ISSN : 2434-7132
Print ISSN : 1348-0898
Volume 11 , Issue 1
Showing 1-3 articles out of 3 articles from the selected issue
  • Ukyo Sawaguchi
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 1-9
    Published: 2012
    Released: May 11, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      This study examined the influence that the several cognition and emotion felt at “kandoh” gave in mental health and psychological well-being. “Kandoh” is positive and very large emotional experience. In English, “Kandoh” is moving, touching or impressive. The cognition (sympathy and respect), emotion (joy, surprise, sadness) are felt at “kandoh”. It was expected that “kandoh” influenced mental health and psychological well-being, because the emotion is related with mental health and psychological well-being.

      As a result of the covariance structure analysis, mental health and psychological well-being were related with “kandoh”. However, the emotional influence was shown not to be large, and it was shown that sympathy of the cognition had influence. This result suggested that in the study of “kandoh” need to study with the perspective which is different from the conventional emotion study. In addition, the result suggested that mental health promoted “kandoh”. And it was shown “kandoh” raised psychological well-being.

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  • Megumi Saito, Koji Takenaka
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 11-20
    Published: 2012
    Released: May 11, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      OBJECTIVE: The purpose of the present study was to examine the effective intervention strategies on lifestyle-based physical activity among inactive Japanese office workers who commute by train. METHODS: (1) Internet-based survey was conducted among 114 Japanese adults aged 20-59 years to determine the feasibility of the behavior strategies such as “Use stairs at the station” and “Go to shop on foot”. Secondly, the relationship between feasible strategies and socio demographic attributes were investigated using Chi-square test and residual analysis. (2) Thirteen participants (age: 43.4 ± 7.7) were randomly divided to the intervention group (n = 6) and the control group (n = 7). A pedometer and a self-monitoring form were provided individually to all the participants. In addition to these materials, a behavior strategy personally tailored to the intervention group was given. After five weeks of intervention, the change of step counts (follow up step counts – baseline step counts) between the two groups was compared using the Mann-Whitney test. Results: (1) “Use stair at the station” and “Take a walk around neighborhood” were the top two of the most feasible behavior strategies. The results of Chi-square test and residual analysis indicated that gender, the stage of change for exercise, and commuting time were significantly related to several behavior strategies. (2) After the intervention, there was a significantly difference in change of step counts between the two groups (p < .05). Conclusion: The findings indicate the positive impact of the intervention strategy using tailored behavior strategies to increase the amount of lifestyle-based physical activity.

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  • Megumi Saito, Koji Takenaka
    2012 Volume 11 Issue 1 Pages 21-28
    Published: 2012
    Released: May 11, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

      BACKGROUND: In 2008, the specific health guidance had begun. Instructors were required to lead targets to healthy behavior change. Several studies suggest that collaborative goal setting and action planning may be the effective strategy in promoting behavior change. However, very few studies are conducted in Japan to validate the impact of such programs. PURPOSE: To validate a tablet computer-based behavioral change program for the instructors (tBCPI) to lead targets to increase amount of physical activity based on the action planning strategy. METHODS: The study was conducted on 48 adults who were recruited by the undergraduate student for 1 month intervention period. Participants (average age of 30.2 years; SD = 16.4, female 64%) were randomly assigned to one of the following three groups: 1) the action planning group (n = 16); 2) the goal-setting group (n = 16); and 3) the control walking group (n = 16). 1) the action planning group participants set their achievable step count goal and make action plan that can help the participant fulfill the goal. 2) the goal-setting group participants set their achievable step count goal, and 3) the control walking group participants were encouraged to devise their own ways of increasing their step count. RESULTS: There was a significant difference in the changing ratio of step count from the baseline between action planning group and control group (119.9 (SD 46.0)% vs. 98.1 (17.3)%, p < .1). CONCLUSION: Although preliminary, the tBCPI can be regarded as a promising population approach method. However, the study period was short, and a longer-term intervention study is desirable.

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