Organizational Science
Online ISSN : 2187-932X
Print ISSN : 0286-9713
ISSN-L : 0286-9713
Current issue
Displaying 1-9 of 9 articles from this issue
ARTICLES FOR THE SPECIAL ISSUE
  • A Quantitative Analysis of Entrepreneurship Education in a Commercial High School with Regional Collaboration
    Keiichi Takami, Keiko Yokoyama, Kei Miyazaki
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 5-20
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    In this study, we conducted quantitative research on mechanisms to enhance entrepreneurship among commercial high school students. We identify the following three points: (1) Promoting cross-border learning effectively enhances students’ entrepreneurship; (2) third-place characteristics within the community of practice effectively facilitate crossborder learning, and (3) enhancing third-place characteristics involves teachers exercising servant leadership and fostering spontaneity and informality in the community of practice.

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  • A Problematizing Review of Its Research and Practice
    Shuhei Matsumoto, Junya Yanagi, Jin-ichiro Yamada
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 21-36
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    While there is a growing societal expectation and momentum surrounding Entrepreneurship Education (EE), numerous critical issues remain in research and practice. This study employs a Problematizing Review methodology to analyze 112 reports of empirical studies on entrepreneurial intention within the context of EE. We identify the acceleration of issues and a potential myopic focus in research and practice that have been pointed out in previous studies since the 2010s. The study recommends future research agendas and designs to overcome these challenges.

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  • An Exploratory Study of Japanese Technology-Based Startups
    Masahiro Kondo
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 37-53
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    This study aims to investigate the capital acquisition processes for startups, focusing on Japanese technology-based startups, through grants across various growth stages. Through exploratory factor analysis, it was revealed that grants obtained during the conception stage contribute to capital accumulation concerning entrepreneurial maturity and the development of business ideas. Conversely, during the conception-commercialization stage, grants are vital in capital accumulation related to team maturity, product commercialization, and industry legitimacy.
    Considering Japan’s institutional environment, characterized by lower startup investment compared to the United States and a concentration of investment in seed-early stages, grants emerge as pivotal in resource acquisition for startups from the ideation to commercialization stages. Furthermore, grants appear to enhance entrepreneurial education in Japan’s less entrepreneurial environment, indicating a broader role beyond mere financial support.
    While existing studies focused on grants’ signaling function and their impact on fundraising, our findings suggest that grants facilitate the acquisition of resource and institutional capital, potentially leading to advantageous fundraising in subsequent stages.

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  • Introducing Error Covariance Using Four-Step Procedure
    Sachiko Mikuni, Hirofumi Tatsumoto
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 54-72
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    The validity of a nine-factor career anchor model, proposed as an alternative to Schein’s (1990) original eight-factor model, was examined on a sample of 1,083 employees from large Japanese firms. Employing a four-step procedure, the study introduces three types of error covariance into the model while evaluating its goodness of fit. Our findings indicate that Technical/Functional Competence, General Managerial Competence, Security/Stability, Service/Dedication to a Cause, Lifestyle, and Entrepreneurship can be applied to the Japanese context.
    However, the concept of a Creativity Anchor may require reassessment, considering the belief that creativity is cultivated before embarking on a career, potentially conflicting with Schein’s theory of career anchors. Moreover, there was a recommendation to modify the wording “I would rather leave my organization than” specific to the Career Orientation Questionnaire. Additionally, this study highlights error covariance from Schwartz’s (1992) twopole dimension and demonstrates the benefits of incorporating theoretically relevant error covariance to improve model fit. The absence of Autonomy/Independence could be a characteristic unique to large Japanese firms, suggesting a need for further investigation by expanding the sample size to include independent workers.

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  • The Dual Process Model of Its Negative Influence
    Masumi Noto, Yoku Date
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 73-86
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Counterproductive behavior is presumed to adversely affect not only its direct victims and the organization but also witnesses. This study expands the scope of the dual process model, previously focused on the negative influence of observing interpersonal counterproductive behavior, to include a broader range of counterproductive behaviors. It investigates how witnessing counterproductive behavior impacts attitudes toward work and the organization. Analyzing 402 responses from an online survey, the study finds that witnessing counterproductive behavior escalates work-related stress, undermines organizational justice, and influences various outcomes.

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  • Emergence of Synergy Through Reallocation of Employees
    Kazuki Yokota
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 87-100
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    A firm’s strategic business exit may stimulate knowledge transfer within the organization that would not otherwise have occurred. The key mechanism behind this effect is the reallocation of its employees. The analysis results show that patents related to cellular phones increased their influence within the company after Mitsubishi Electric Corporation’s withdrawal from the cellular phone business. This result suggests that synergies may be realized following a business exit and that reallocating employees is crucial. These findings have critical implications for understanding the inter-temporal scope economies of multi-divisional firms.

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  • The Process of Acquiring Publicness in Panasonic’s Corporate History
    Hiroyuki Nakazono, Hiromichi Hasebe
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 101-114
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    This paper examines how companies are making their histories as strategic resources. The study focuses on the evolution of Panasonic’s approach to compiling corporate history and identifies two main implications. Firstly, overcoming the limitations imposed by the founder’s narratives is crucial. The unintended negative consequences of Rhetorical History (RH) play a significant role in the analysis of RH strategies, especially in the post-Konosuke Matsushita era at Panasonic, marked by the increasing“ deification” of Matsushita. However, as demonstrated by Kunio Nakamura’s initiatives, radically reinterpreting the founder’s narratives for flexible strategic planning can lead to“ de-deification” and the strategic use of historical resources for justifying new strategies. Secondly, the paper explores the limitations of implementing RH strategies within an organization when relying solely on radical reinterpretation. Kazuhiro Tsuga adeptly navigated these limitations by integrating organizational efforts in historical utilization, further promoting “de-deification.” This case study shows that the historical department’s commitment to maintaining public historical records not only preserves the distinctiveness of Panasonic’s history but also reinforces its legitimacy. This emergent organizational context and the “two-stage de-deification” process, which makes history accessible to all, were indispensable in legitimizing RH-based strategies at Panasonic.

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  • An Exploratory Study to Employ Performance Forecasts Dat
    Osamu Suzuki
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 115-125
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Aspiration level is defined as an organizational goal. Attainment of the aspiration level regulates risk-pursuing decisions by organizations. However, there is a dearth of empirical research examining the consistency between assumptions underlying operationalization of aspiration levels and actual goal setting behaviors by organizations. We empirically analyzed updates of financial performance forecasts disclosed by sample firms. Our finding is that these firms flexibly adjust allocation of weights between prior forecasts and prior results. This observation is particularly salient for sample firms characterized with limited organizational slack. Our results suggest that we reconsider the assumption that aspiration level is set to be stable by a simple mechanical formula.

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  • Unquestioned Power Behind Data Falsification Crimes
    Asuka Takaoka
    2024 Volume 57 Issue 4 Pages 126-144
    Published: June 20, 2024
    Released on J-STAGE: July 02, 2024
    JOURNAL FREE ACCESS

    Unlike street crimes, corporate crimes occur due to power rather than personal motives. Hence, the following question arises: what are the types of power and mechanisms that make employees commit corporate crimes? Previous research has examined this power dynamic between two individuals; however, only a few studies have comprehensively considered the power mechanism among multiple stakeholders involved in organisational crimes. Furthermore, among the various types of corporate crimes, data falsification crimes without economic incentives or hierarchical power relations have received little attention despite their pervasiveness and significance. This study examines 35 data falsification crimes that occurred between 2015 and 2022 in Japan to address these gaps. The resulting fraudulent power model identifies 11 types of power grouped into three core categories: formal, norm, and neglect. The findings reveal that the most common mechanism for data falsification crimes is the combination of norm and neglect power, supported by organisational dysfunctions. Data falsification can happen without any formal power. This newly identified mechanism behind data falsification contributes to research on fraud models and organisational power literature. Practically, firms may refer to these types of power as fraud risk indicators to assess their status quo and implement preventive measures.

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