Japnese Journal of Educational Media Research
Online ISSN : 2424-2527
Print ISSN : 1340-9352
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Volume 21 , Issue 1
Showing 1-8 articles out of 8 articles from the selected issue
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  • Kazunori SATO, Yu NAKAHASHI
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 1-10
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    This study clarifies learning effects of debating the arguments related to share own movie work on video sharing sites, specifically in the field of media literacy, where video production occurs. The study takes as its subject the fifth and sixth grades in elementary school, and conducts a learning program that aims to improve media literacy through video production. Average scores on the media literacy evaluation metrics demonstrate that the “ability to comprehend, interpret, and appreciate media” and the “ability to express thoughts through media” significantly increased in schoolchildren who debated and revised areas that should be considered when publicizing video products on a video sharing sites.
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  • Norio SETOZAKI, Mai OKUDA, Yusuke MORITA
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 11-20
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    The popularity of tablet devices in the field of education is expected to greatly increase. It is reported that Information and Communication Technology (ICT) is not appropriately used in school trips. Nevertheless, ICT can aid in solving problems such as shortening the time of pre- and post-learning, and use of a personal computer room. Therefore, this study investigated the use of a tablet device in independent training of a group during a school trip from a viewpoint of “interest” and “usefulness.” Results revealed that for pre-learning, a tablet device is useful in improving the interest. Moreover, the data stored in the tablet device at the time of pre-learning was useful for experiential activities. Finally, the AR Poster, which can view and listen for tablet devices, is useful as a tool for presentation of post-learning.
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  • Masayuki YAMADA, Shinichi SATO, Makoto KAGETO
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 21-31
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    In recent years, the practice of combining project-based learning with actual experience (e.g., overseas study tours and domestic fieldwork) has increased. Challenges are determining how learners reflect on the effect and significance of their experiences, and how teachers support students’ preliminary activities. This study targeted the project-based learning at Nihon Fukushi University at the time of the university’s hosting of an international exchange event—the World Youth Meeting. This paper discusses a case study that used an SNS visualization system to support learners in before-and-after the event. The results suggest that the participants could apply the system to reflect on the project-based learning after the event, and to grasp the whole picture of the project from the very first year. Furthermore, it was expected for students to recognize the importance of working with a big picture of the project, and to use the system consecutively. The visualization system seemed to be useful in the project-based learning, and a guideline for the next year’s project was also proposed.
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  • Masato WADA
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 33-43
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    In order to increase students’ capability responses to risks faced by high school children online, Ministry of Internal Affairs and Communications published Internet Literacy Assessment indicator for Students (ILAS) in 2012. It would appear that there is a third-person effect on Internet Literacy; a person need to teach Internet Literacy to high school children who are less literate than themselves. Teachers, who teach high school’s common subject “computer science”, in many cases teach other subjects and have therefore have little time to increase their own levels of literacy. Hence, to collect a fundamental material for computer science pre-service teachers’ learning of literacy within their university courses, a study from a third-person point of view was conducted so this research could gather further understanding of existing literacy levels. For achieving this purpose, two research questions were used in this study. Research Question (RQ) 1: Do computer science pre-service teachers recognize that high school children’ literacies are lower than their own levels? RQ 2: Are the pre-service teachers’ understandings of RQ1 related to a need to teach children literacy? 51computer science pre-service teachers evaluated in relation to their literacy with ILAS and this group subsequently estimated high school children’s literacy using ILAS. Results showed that the pre-service teachers’ literacies were higher than the children’s and that the pre-service teachers' desire to teach children literacy was not explained by students’ estimations for children’s levels of literacy. These results resolved RQ1 however did not fully answer RQ2. A part of this group of pre-service teachers keenly felt the need to teach children such literacies and had many suggestions in terms of the materials and methods which could be used for teaching such literacies.
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  • [in Japanese]
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 45-46
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 47-50
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Download PDF (668K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 51-52
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
    Download PDF (941K)
  • [in Japanese]
    Volume 21 (2014) Issue 1 Pages 53-54
    Released: September 14, 2017
    JOURNALS OPEN ACCESS
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