AUDIOLOGY JAPAN
Online ISSN : 1883-7301
Print ISSN : 0303-8106
ISSN-L : 0303-8106
Volume 29 , Issue 3
Showing 1-15 articles out of 15 articles from the selected issue
  • [in Japanese], [in Japanese]
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 141
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • [in Japanese]
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 142-146
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Yukio Toda, Kiyomi Yoshino, Yoshie Yoshikawa, Isamu Takeyama
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 147-151
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Fifteen cases with acute sensori-neural deafness induced by loud rock music attended our clinic in the past seven years. Ten cases were those affected by rock concerts (group I), while five cases were those affected by discos (group II).
    Clinical differences between two groups were as follows; In both groups, the cases with unilaterally affected ears were observed more than those with bilaterally affected ears. Those in group II were affected more severely than those in group 1. The cases with a dip type audiogram were observed in group I more than in group II. Two cases in group I and two cases in group II revealed poor prognosis.
    In seven cases, the affected ears were the same side as the sound speakers were nearer to them.
    But no significant causative factors were observed in physical fatigue, mental fatigue, excitement during concerts, family history, past history, and the extent which they were exposed to loud sounds in daily life.
    Then, some important aspects as to auditory damage induced by rock concerts were discussed.
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  • Shinji Miyake, Masami Ohhashi, Nobuko Dota, Yuuko Tachibana
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 152-157
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to clarify the condition of using the headphone, a survey was curried out at 4 high schools in Sapporo. Questionares were administrated to 1625 students. 66 frequent headphone users (F group), 65 non-headphone users (N group) and 15 students with hearing loss of unknown origin found by a periodical medical examination at their high schools (H group) were selected and thier hearing levels were tested.
    The results showed that 98 percents of students had some kinds of audio apparatus and 70 percents of them used headphones. One (1.5%) of F group, one (1.5%) of N group and three (20.0%) of H group showed a dip or high tone deafness. There was no significiant difference between the incidence of deafness in F group and in N group.
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  • T Ino, H. Ono, T. Deguchi, A. Yamada, K. Okamoto
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 158-163
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The purposes of this experiment were to measure the sound intensity level in several discotheques and to compare the temporary threshold shift of subjects exposed to 60 minutes of discotheque sound at several intensity levels. We measured the sound intensity level with our own personal noise exposure meter.
    1. Sound intensity levels in 4 discotheques were ranged from 95dB (A) to 105.9dB (A).
    2. The largest TTS were 44dB at 4kHz for TTS2 and was found in the subjects, who were exposed to the intensity level of 107.0dB (A).
    3. It appears that the intensity level of 105dB is too high from the standpoint of the risk for hearing damage and that the level of 90dB does not satisfy audience.
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  • Yuichiro Oishi, Tadahiko Ino, Keijiro Koga, Masahiro Hanamoto
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 164-170
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The TTS2 hypothesis states that a temporary threshold shift measured at 2 minutes after cessation of an 8 hours noise exposure closely approximates the permanent threshold shift (PTS) incurred after a 10-20 years exposure to that same level.
    1) TTS2 in young subjects aged from 19 to 23 years were measured by intensive music sound generated from an open typed headphone at 108dB (SPL) for 4 hours. The values of TTS2 at 2000-8000Hz were 10-17dB.
    2) TTS2 in 3 subjects aged about 30 years, 40 years and 50 years old were measured by 117dB (SPL) sound for 1 hour. TTS2 values in the former 2 subjects were 8-10dB at 2000-8000Hz, in the other subject PTS of 40dB at 8000Hz was revealed.
    3) The intensity of sound at 30cm distance from a headphone generating tone of 108dB (SPL) at ears were 55dB (A). In this condition those ears could not hear the voice of 90dB (A) at 1 meter distance from the headphone.
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  • Tsunemasa Satoh, Hiroyuki Zusho, Kenshi Yamamoto, Masato Shirakura, Ta ...
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 171-182
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Medical records on 83 patients with hearing loss induced by the exposure to discotheque sound were collected from 40 departments of otorhinolaryngology of main medical universities and major hospitals in Japan and analized.
    The following results were obtained:
    1. The peak incidence was found in the twenties. Male and female were equally affected.
    2. The sources of noise exposure were concerts (39%), discotheques (26%), headphones (17%) and others. Most patients were listening to the rock and roll music. Average exposure time were three hours.
    3. Most patients had some trigger mechanism before the onset of the disease. Many patients had long histories of listening to the noisy music in the past time.
    4. Dip pattern hearing loss was mainly noted in younger patients with both ears affected. Low frequency hearing loss was noted in elderies with one ear affected.
    5. Recruitment phenomenon was positive in all patients examined.
    6. The prognosis of dip pattern hearing loss in young patients was favourable, while low frequency hearing loss of elderies was poor.
    7. Steroid therapy had no beneficial effect on the prognosis.
    It is thought that the causes of hearing loss may be mainly due to so-called “delayed recovery NITTS”, and low frequency hearing loss and others may be due to acute hearing loss of so-called “short term exposure of noise”.
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  • Hiromi Wada, Chihiro Nakagawa, Yoshitane Nishimota, Kozo Tsuchiya, Kaz ...
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 183-188
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Using chronic electrodes placed on the round window membrane, changes of action potential (AP) and summating potential (SP) were measured following the application of repeated noise in rabbits. The intensity of the noise ranged between 80 and 100dB (SPL).
    The results were as follows;
    1) (+) SP/AP was increased following noise exposure.
    2) (+) SP/AP increasement was found while hearing was impaired progressively.
    3) It was suspected, however, that (+) SP/AP did not increase when temporary threshold shift (TTS) was found.
    It is difficult to anticipate permanent hearing disorders by investigation of TTS. (+) SP/AP increasement following noise exposure may be the useful parameter of the permanent hearing disorders.
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  • Nobukiyo Satoh, Masami Ohhashi, Nobuko Dota, Yuhko Konari, Yuhko Tachi ...
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 189-193
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In order to obtain the accurate predictive audiograms of young children, we have tried the combined examination with ABR and SVR for hearing impaired children, and discussed the confidence of this examination based on 33 cases with a long-term follow up.
    We used ABR for 1, 2, 4, KHz with tone pips, and SVR for 0.5kHz with tone bursts. Compairing the threshold of ABR and SVR examination and that of pure tone audiometry after some years, there was a high correlation in each frequency.
    Though ABR is very useful examination for hearing impaired children, it was reported that the greatest error was observed in some cases with steeply sloping audiograms. On the other hand SVR has weak points such as false positive dicision, but this statistics showed a high correlation to pure tone audiometry. We concluded that SVR was an effective examination in low frequencies if careful dicisions and good conditions was made, and emphasized that the combining ABR and SVR made ERA examination more thorough and accurate.
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  • Toshiaki Yagi, Junko Yamakoshi, Yuzuru Kobayashi, Tomokazu Kamio
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 194-198
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    The auditory evoked responses were recorded from a 26-year-old male with a cochlear implant. The patient received the cochlear implant on October 25, 1984, in the left ear. The cochlear implant device was the 3M/House (alpha design) single channel type. And he is the second patient who received the cochlear implant surgery in Japan.
    The device was activated 2 months after the surgery and the patient recognized the speech and environmental sounds through the device. The auditory evoked responses were recorded 8 months after the surgery under normal use condition that is the sound stimuli delivered through loud speaker in the open field, so that the sound was conducted via microphone, signal processor, external coil, internal coil and then active electrode in the cochlea. The slow vertex response could be evoked by 70dB SPL tone bursts at the frequencies of 500Hz and 90dB SPL at 1000Hz. The auditory brainstem response, however, was not be able to record by click stimuli. Thus, the auditory evoked response, especially the slow vertex response in this recording situation, is useful indicator for the objective evaluation of the function of the cochlear implant device.
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  • Hidenobu Taiji
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 199-212
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    Characteristics of the combination tone 2f2-f2 in the human ear-canal sound pressure were investigated with a spectrum analyzer.
    1) Non-linear wave equations showed that the combination tone 2f1-f2 results from a third-order (cubic) non-linearity, and L (2f1-f2) is determinedby L (f1) 2L (f2).
    2) From the results of these investigations, it seemed clear that the combination tone 2f1-f2 is not generated in the experimental apparatus, in the external ear, in the eardrum, but in the cochlea or the more central pathway.
    3) The growth of the 2f1-f2 level with increasing stimulus level can be divided into two ranges (slope near 1, and slope near 3).
    In the range of the slope near 1, it was assumed that an active process of the inner ear affects the vibration of the basilar membrane and has some relationship to the generation of the 2f1-f2 tone.
    4) The 2f1-f2 level decreased gradually with increasing frequency separation of the primary tones.
    5) In patients of mumps deafness, the 2f1-f2 level was reduced at the low stimulus levels (L<90dB). But the 2f1-f2 level was not affected by a threshold dip.
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  • Naoki Inamura, Jun Kusakari, Tomonori Takasaka
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 213-218
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    In the second report, we have already clarified that the response to hypothermia differs in each turn and the transient increase in AP amplitude is due to the increased response originating from the basal turn. Concerning this peculiar manner of AP amplitude, we suspected the olivocochlear bundle (OCB) to be involved. Therefore, the effect of transection of OCB upon AP was examined. No significant change was found in the threshold and latency of AP, but the AP amplitude was slightly increased after the transection of OCB. When the animal was cooled after the transection of uncrossed OCB, the transient increase in the AP amplitude was not remarkable, but there was no statistically significant difference from that in non-section cases. In the case of cooling after the transectian of the crossed and uncrossed OCB, however, the AP amplitude demonstrated almost linear decrease as a function of temperature decline. With these results, we concluded that the transient increase of AP amplitude during hypothermia was due to the elimination of the inhibitory effect by OCB.
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  • Hidekazu Tanaka, Ikuko Taniguchi
    1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 219-224
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
    We examined the auditory evoked potentials (AEP) by click stimulation in the medial geniculate body (MG) of the unanesthetized guinea pigs. The following results were obtained.
    1. The AEPs were best recorded in the ventral division of MG, with the latency about 9msec. The amplitude of the AEP was larger in the medial side of MG than the lateral side. And the polarity of the AEP was positive in the caudal portion of MG, but negative in the rostral portion.
    2. In the auditory evoked potentials recorded from the vertex, MG was profoundly concerned with the positive wave with the latency about 9msec, following to ABR.
    3. Nembutal anesthesia decreased the amplitude of the AEP, but had little effect on the latency.
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  • 1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 231
    Published: June 30, 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • 1986 Volume 29 Issue 3 Pages 233
    Published: 1986
    Released: April 30, 2010
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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