Circulation Reports
Online ISSN : 2434-0790
Volume 2 , Issue 5
Showing 1-4 articles out of 4 articles from the selected issue
Original Articles
Heart Failure
  • Shutaro Futami, Joji Ishikawa, Chihiro Jubishi, Ruri Shimizu, Teppei M ...
    Type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
    Subject area: Heart Failure
    2020 Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 265-270
    Published: May 08, 2020
    Released: May 08, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: March 26, 2020
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    Background:Elderly patients admitted to hospital with heart failure (HF) often have cognitive impairment, but the association between these conditions is unclear.

    Methods and Results:We enrolled 43 patients admitted to a geriatric hospital with HF. We evaluated echocardiography, Mini Mental State Examination (MMSE), and extracellular water/total body water (ECW/TBW) ratio (Inbody S10). Mean age was 85.1±8.0 years (range, 60–99 years) and 44.2% of the patients were men. Mean MMSE score was 20.5±5.4, with 66.7% of the patients showing cognitive impairment (MMSE ≤23). There was a significant negative correlation of MMSE score with age (r=−0.344, P=0.032), regular alcohol drinking (r=0.437, P=0.007), uric acid level (r=0.413, P=0.010), and ECW/TBW ratio (r=−0.437, P=0.007). On stepwise regression analysis including these covariates, MMSE score was significantly associated with the ECW/TBW ratio (β=0.443, P=0.009). When several echocardiography parameters (i.e., end-diastolic left ventricular volume, r=0.327, P=0.048; left atrial volume index, r=−0.411, P=0.012; and transmitral inflow A wave velocity, r=−0.625, P=0.001) were added to the model, MMSE score was found to be related to the A wave (P=0.001) and to atrial volume index (P=0.015), which are measures of diastolic function.

    Conclusions:In elderly patients with HF, cognitive function might be influenced by body water distribution and diastolic heart function.

  • Shingo Tsujinaga, Hiroyuki Iwano, Yasuyuki Chiba, Suguru Ishizaka, Miw ...
    Type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
    Subject area: Heart Failure
    2020 Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 271-279
    Published: May 08, 2020
    Released: May 08, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: April 07, 2020
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    Background:Ventilatory inefficiency during exercise assessed using the lowest minute ventilation/carbon dioxide production (V̇E/V̇CO2) ratio was recently proven to be a strong prognostic marker of heart failure (HF) regardless of left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Its physiological background, however, has not been elucidated.

    Methods and Results:Fifty-seven HF patients underwent cardiopulmonary exercise testing and exercise-stress echocardiography. The lowest V̇E/V̇CO2ratio was assessed on respiratory gas analysis. Echocardiography was obtained at rest and at peak exercise. LVEF was measured using the method of disks. Cardiac output (CO) and the ratio of transmitral early filling velocity (E) to early diastolic tissue velocity (e’) were calculated using the Doppler method. HF patients were divided into preserved EF (HFpEF) and reduced EF (HFrEF) using the LVEF cut-off 40% at rest. Twenty-four patients were classified as HFpEF and 33 as HFrEF. In HFpEF, age (r=0.58), CO (r=−0.44), e’ (r=−0.48) and E/e’ (r=0.45) during exercise correlated with the lowest V̇E/V̇CO2ratio (P<0.05 for all). In contrast, in HFrEF, age (r=0.47) and CO (r=−0.54) during exercise, but not e’ and E/e’, correlated with the lowest V̇E/V̇CO2ratio.

    Conclusions:Loss of CO augmentation was associated with ventilatory inefficiency in HF regardless of LVEF, although lung congestion determined ventilatory efficiency only in HFpEF.

Ischemic Heart Disease
  • Ryu Shutta, Daisaku Nakatani, Yasuhiko Sakata, Shungo Hikoso, Hiroya M ...
    Type: ORIGINAL ARTICLE
    Subject area: Ischemic Heart Disease
    2020 Volume 2 Issue 5 Pages 280-287
    Published: May 08, 2020
    Released: May 08, 2020
    [Advance publication] Released: April 04, 2020
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    Background:Studies comparing the cardiac consequences of hydrophilic and lipophilic statins in experimental and clinical practice settings have produced inconsistent results. In particular, evidence focusing on diabetic patients after acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is lacking.

    Methods and Results:From the Osaka Acute Coronary Insufficiency Study (OACIS) registry database, 1,752 diabetic patients with AMI who were discharged with a prescription for statins were studied. Long-term outcomes were compared between hydrophilic and lipophilic statins, including all-cause death, recurrent myocardial infarction (re-MI) and admission for heart failure (HF) and a composite of these (major adverse cardiac events; MACE). During a median follow-up period of 1,059 days, all-cause death, non-fatal re-MI, admission for HF, and MACE occurred in 95, 89, 112 and 249 patients, respectively. Although there was no significant difference between statins in the risk of all-cause death, re-MI and MACE, the risk of HF admission was significantly lower in patients with hydrophilic than lipophilic statins before (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR], 0.560; 95% CI: 0.345–0.911, P=0.019) and after (aHR, 0.584; 95% CI: 0.389–0.876, P=0.009) propensity score matching. Hydrophilic statin use was consistently associated with lower risk for HF admission than lipophilic statins across the subgroup categories.

    Conclusions:In the present diabetic patients with AMI, hydrophilic statins were associated with a lower risk of admission for HF than lipophilic statins.

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