STUDIES IN SIMULATION AND GAMING
Online ISSN : 2434-0472
Print ISSN : 1345-1499
Volume 19 , Issue 1
Showing 1-17 articles out of 17 articles from the selected issue
Individual Papers
Refereed Papers
  • Toshiko KIKKAWA
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 1-8
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In this paper, the author explored the implications of university students designing their own Sugoroku game. Sugoroku is a Japanese game that is similar to the goose game or snakes and ladders. First, the author briefly reviewed the life stories depicted in existing Sugoroku games. Then, the author introduced a procedure for designing one’s own Sugoroku game in university classes. On scrutinizing the stories of the Sugoroku games designed by students, it was found that university students most frequently referred to passing the entrance examination in their life stories. In addition, in stories describing their possible futures, bifurcations often appeared when crucial decisions affecting their lives have to be made. The fields of Sugoroku also included self-encouraging messages. The game-design process made the students reflect on what they had accomplished in the past, which may have improved their level of self-acceptance. Finally, the future implications of this method are discussed.

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  • Ayumu ARAKAWA
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 9-16
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    We developed “Saiban-in saiban game” for citizens to go through the deliberation process in Saibannin-Seido (Japanese mixed jury system) and to gather citizen’s lay theory. To examine the effects of the game, fifty undergraduate students participated in the simulation. The results of a written questionnaire after the gaming showed that they change their opinion about Saibannin-Seido and that they had an emotional feeling in the game. The analysis results in their communication showed that we could gather citizens’reasoning for guilty or not-guilty. These showed usefulness of the game, and it suggests availability for law-related education in each level.

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Special Section: Simulation and Gaming in COE and GP Activities (4)
Invited Paper
  • Hitoshi MORIKAWA, Toshiki MATSUDA, Saori TAKASUNA
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 17-28
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The objective of this documents is to introduce the research projects for the 21st Century COE Program, which was called “Evolutino of Urban Earthquake Engineering,” and the Global COE Program “International Urban Earthquake Engineering Center for Mitigating Seismic Mega Risk.” The authors, however, cannot figure whole picture of the projects, thus, focuses on some speci?c topics which are related to the simulation and gaming and they have commited through the projects. For this, the authors try to discuss an approach for different kinds of researches, which must be “modeling, verification, and application,”through the viewpoints of simulation and gaming.

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Special Section: Ethical Problems in Simulation and Gaming (3)
Invited Paper
  • Shigehisa TSUCHIYA
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 29-39
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    Analyzing several major corporate accidents in Japan, the author came to the conclusion that the lowering of ethical standards was the root cause of the accidents resulting in severe damage to public image and profit. The author also found that maintaining effective communication through ‘openness’ is the main leverage in preventing deterioration of ethical standards and practices, thus reducing the risks of major accidents occurring. The approach selected for teaching and training of business ethics and openness was learning by doing with the help of gaming/simulation. By using this approach the author developed two gaming/simulation exercises, the RESCUE TEAM and the KING OF FISHERMEN.

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SpecialSection: How Do We Evaluate Experience and Learning in the Gaming-simulation?
Refereed Papers
  • [in Japanese]
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 41-46
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS
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  • Chiaki IWAI
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 47-59
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The main purpose of this study is to compare the results of different member structures of two business gaming experiments with reference to former research (Iwai 2007). Several research papers, which relate to group decision-making by using business game, are reviewed as well. In the research paper review, the evaluation criteria, the number of team members and structure of the team are focused. The results of experiments, using “MBABEST 21, next generation DVD scenario" business game against two different test subject groups were conducted. Both business games are compared and analyzed.

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  • Shinobu KITANI
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 61-72
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The article aims to propose a new type of evaluation framework on a gaming simulation, not for an education tool, but for awaking in participants a feeling out of place and developing an attitude of mind to the simulation. The evaluation framework is constructed in view of an inner measurement theory. In the theory, an unexpected event is focused, which doesn’t mean an improbable one, but one that is beyond our understanding. Therefore, participants’ feelings and attitudinal changes were carefully examined when those events are expected to happen. My hypothesis is that participants are divided into two cultures as in the case study called “Bafa Bafa” which helps to understand cross-cultural experience: the alpha-culture and the beta-culture. And then, results shown in some articles are re-investigated by my evaluation framework, where participants’ feelings and attitudes against events in the simulation are compared with those inferred by thought experiments. In conclusion, the fact that cultural prejudice or ethnocentrism were strengthened seems not to be a special effect on “Bafa Bafa,” some feelings and attitudes against unexpected events has appeared admittedly in both cultures, and participants of the beta-culture would feel more alienated than those of the alpha-culture.

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  • Shinichi ENDO, Toshiki MATSUDA
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 73-86
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    The design of educational gaming could be discussed from the viewpoint of simulation and gaming field as well as education field. For example, the design method by Greenblat (1988) is known in the former field, and so is instructional design for teaching material development in the latter. One of the differences between the two is that instructional design, which focuses on the learning of individuals and control of it, puts emphasis on providing timely feedback to learners based on consecutive formative evaluation; whereas the gaming method, which focuses on learning through experience and group interaction, suggests providing feedback in the debriefing programmed at the end of the activities. In this article, we firstly compare the two types of practices on Engineer’s Moral Education to a class of forty students. Then, we discuss how formative evaluation should be incorporated in an educational gaming when it aims to promote learner’s understanding of problem situations as a whole and attitude transformation.

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  • Junkichi SUGIURA, Toshiko KIKKAWA
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 87-99
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In this study, “KEEP COOL,” which is a board game based on the theme of global warming, is investigated as a case study. Evaluations of gaming experience included the evaluations by players, and by facilitators as well, who have experienced the game beforehand. Evaluation of the game was divided in three processes: evaluation at the time of introduction, determination of introduction and preparation, and practice evaluation. Moreover, an exercise for an experienced game player to introduce the game under a different situation was prepared. The evaluation criteria and practice method for the experienced game player were examined to evaluate the subject of the study situation. Furthermore, the study argued about the case of the technique regarding evaluation of game experience during and after implementation of a game. As mentioned above, it was suggested that the meaning of a game and the point of evaluation are decided on the basis of the evaluation criterion of game experience of the facilitators.

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Invited Papers
  • Arata ICHIKAWA
    2009 Volume 19 Issue 1 Pages 101-111
    Published: August 25, 2009
    Released: September 14, 2020
    JOURNALS FREE ACCESS

    In 1947, a few years after the end of WWII, many leading teachers commenced to practice the experiential learning education in elementary, junior high, and high schools. Many of the practice cases of “Learning by Playing” during that time correspond with our gaming simulation. In the following decade, those who led the learning-by playing education were facing the criticism that the experiential learning education was a factor that caused students’ decline in academic achievement. As the experiential learning could not answer to the criticism with proper theory and evidence, the experiential learning practice was then discarded from the Japanese school system. In 2002, integrated learning for fostering students’ability of creative thinking, critical thinking, and communications became a compulsory subject in elementary, junior high, and high schools all over Japan. In practice, integrated learning corresponds with seminar education where college students participate in cooperative/collaborative learning pursuing research discipline with their professor. However, criticism in the decline in academic achievement is rising again, this time including university education with the advancement rate 50% or more.

    In a classroom, it is necessary to show teacher’s own scholarly discipline in his/her facilitation of gaming so as not to repeat history. The educational value of gaming as a holistic cognitive process lies in the capability of teachers in handing down to their student’s scholarly discipline they themselves are practicing. This paper aims to strongly recommend the incorporation of the art of gaming facilitation in the science of learning.

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